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Metabotypes with properly functioning mitochondria and anti-inflammation predict extended productive life span in dairy cows.

Huber K, Dänicke S, Rehage J, Sauerwein H, Otto W, Rolle-Kampczyk U, von Bergen M - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans.These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria.The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Science, University of Hohenheim, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The failure to adapt metabolism to the homeorhetic demands of lactation is considered as a main factor in reducing the productive life span of dairy cows. The so far defined markers of production performance and metabolic health in dairy cows do not predict the length of productive life span satisfyingly. This study aimed to identify novel pathways and biomarkers related to productive life in dairy cows by means of (targeted) metabolomics. In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans. These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria. The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life.

No MeSH data available.


Carnitine and acylcarnitines in healthy (H) and left productive life early (LE) cows.Serum carnitine (a), lysine (b), valerylcarnitine (c), hexadecanoylcarnitine (d), octadecanoylcarnitine (e), hexadecadienylcarnitine (f) and octadecadienylcarnitine (g) concentrations in cows that left productive life early (LE, black bars, n = 8) or were healthy (H, grey bars, n = 10) as influenced by parturition and onset of lactation. Given were means ± SEM; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001. Results of repeated measures Two-Way ANOVA and Sidak’s multi comparison posttest (Graphpad.prism version 6.0) demonstrate effects of time and grouping and point out interactions between them (results see Table 2 below).
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f3: Carnitine and acylcarnitines in healthy (H) and left productive life early (LE) cows.Serum carnitine (a), lysine (b), valerylcarnitine (c), hexadecanoylcarnitine (d), octadecanoylcarnitine (e), hexadecadienylcarnitine (f) and octadecadienylcarnitine (g) concentrations in cows that left productive life early (LE, black bars, n = 8) or were healthy (H, grey bars, n = 10) as influenced by parturition and onset of lactation. Given were means ± SEM; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001. Results of repeated measures Two-Way ANOVA and Sidak’s multi comparison posttest (Graphpad.prism version 6.0) demonstrate effects of time and grouping and point out interactions between them (results see Table 2 below).

Mentions: The capacity to utilize substrates, especially fatty acids, for generating of ATP in the respiratory chain requires effective oxidative pathways in mitochondria and is suggested to be an essential prerequisite for metabolic health. The carnitine and acylcarnitine pathway belongs to that capacity and was of particular importance for discriminating the LE versus the H group. Carnitine, synthesized from lysine and methionine in a PPARα-dependent manner in liver, brain and kidney or ingested with the diet, is essential for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and improves glucose homeostasis16. H group cows had higher carnitine concentrations throughout the periparturient period, which was especially obvious at day 100 (Fig. 3a). Concomitantly, H cows had higher plasma lysine concentrations indicating better educt availability for carnitine synthesis (Fig. 3b). Carnitine was also identified as an outstanding disease biomarker in dairy cows developing sickness already during the perparturient period11; however, these cows suffering from different production diseases at the time of examination had higher carnitine concentrations in serum within the transition period. This was suggested to be the consequence of tissue cell death and organ dysfunction leading to release of carnitine and acylcarnitines into serum. The higher carnitine concentrations in H group may support effective mitochondrial acylcarnitine formation by carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1), thereby reducing oxidative stress and accumulation of reactive oxygen species.


Metabotypes with properly functioning mitochondria and anti-inflammation predict extended productive life span in dairy cows.

Huber K, Dänicke S, Rehage J, Sauerwein H, Otto W, Rolle-Kampczyk U, von Bergen M - Sci Rep (2016)

Carnitine and acylcarnitines in healthy (H) and left productive life early (LE) cows.Serum carnitine (a), lysine (b), valerylcarnitine (c), hexadecanoylcarnitine (d), octadecanoylcarnitine (e), hexadecadienylcarnitine (f) and octadecadienylcarnitine (g) concentrations in cows that left productive life early (LE, black bars, n = 8) or were healthy (H, grey bars, n = 10) as influenced by parturition and onset of lactation. Given were means ± SEM; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001. Results of repeated measures Two-Way ANOVA and Sidak’s multi comparison posttest (Graphpad.prism version 6.0) demonstrate effects of time and grouping and point out interactions between them (results see Table 2 below).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835701&req=5

f3: Carnitine and acylcarnitines in healthy (H) and left productive life early (LE) cows.Serum carnitine (a), lysine (b), valerylcarnitine (c), hexadecanoylcarnitine (d), octadecanoylcarnitine (e), hexadecadienylcarnitine (f) and octadecadienylcarnitine (g) concentrations in cows that left productive life early (LE, black bars, n = 8) or were healthy (H, grey bars, n = 10) as influenced by parturition and onset of lactation. Given were means ± SEM; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001. Results of repeated measures Two-Way ANOVA and Sidak’s multi comparison posttest (Graphpad.prism version 6.0) demonstrate effects of time and grouping and point out interactions between them (results see Table 2 below).
Mentions: The capacity to utilize substrates, especially fatty acids, for generating of ATP in the respiratory chain requires effective oxidative pathways in mitochondria and is suggested to be an essential prerequisite for metabolic health. The carnitine and acylcarnitine pathway belongs to that capacity and was of particular importance for discriminating the LE versus the H group. Carnitine, synthesized from lysine and methionine in a PPARα-dependent manner in liver, brain and kidney or ingested with the diet, is essential for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and improves glucose homeostasis16. H group cows had higher carnitine concentrations throughout the periparturient period, which was especially obvious at day 100 (Fig. 3a). Concomitantly, H cows had higher plasma lysine concentrations indicating better educt availability for carnitine synthesis (Fig. 3b). Carnitine was also identified as an outstanding disease biomarker in dairy cows developing sickness already during the perparturient period11; however, these cows suffering from different production diseases at the time of examination had higher carnitine concentrations in serum within the transition period. This was suggested to be the consequence of tissue cell death and organ dysfunction leading to release of carnitine and acylcarnitines into serum. The higher carnitine concentrations in H group may support effective mitochondrial acylcarnitine formation by carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1), thereby reducing oxidative stress and accumulation of reactive oxygen species.

Bottom Line: In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans.These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria.The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Animal Science, University of Hohenheim, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The failure to adapt metabolism to the homeorhetic demands of lactation is considered as a main factor in reducing the productive life span of dairy cows. The so far defined markers of production performance and metabolic health in dairy cows do not predict the length of productive life span satisfyingly. This study aimed to identify novel pathways and biomarkers related to productive life in dairy cows by means of (targeted) metabolomics. In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans. These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria. The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life.

No MeSH data available.