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Impact of Mediated Intimate Interaction on Education: A Huggable Communication Medium that Encourages Listening.

Nakanishi J, Sumioka H, Ishiguro H - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers.Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators.We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent Robotics Laboratory, Graduated School of Engineering Science, Osaka UniversityToyonaka, Japan; Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunication Research Institute InternationalKyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we propose the introduction of human-like communication media as a proxy for teachers to support the listening of children in school education. Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers. We investigate the effect of Hugvie on children's listening and how they and their teachers react to it through observations and interviews. Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators. We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

No MeSH data available.


Simultaneous storytime in children groups.
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Figure 6: Simultaneous storytime in children groups.

Mentions: We introduced Hugvie into storytime sessions in the elementary school event to 139 preschool children who are 5 or 6 years old. They were divided the children into 34 groups of three to five kids with two or three 5th graders as guides of the school. Each group could freely join several sessions (including storytime) in the event. This study was approved by the ethics committee of the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (Kyoto, Japan). We explained our study to all of the children's parents and received informed consent from them. In the storytime events at the school's library, they were given Hugvies and instructed how to use them by showing the correct posture as described in case study 1. We confirmed that all children could comfortably hear the experimenter's voice from their Hugvies. After that the 5th graders told stories with picture books to the preschool children for 10 min (Figure 6). At most four groups of storytime were held at the same time in the same room. The other groups waited in the room until some of the four groups had finished and moved on to other events.


Impact of Mediated Intimate Interaction on Education: A Huggable Communication Medium that Encourages Listening.

Nakanishi J, Sumioka H, Ishiguro H - Front Psychol (2016)

Simultaneous storytime in children groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835693&req=5

Figure 6: Simultaneous storytime in children groups.
Mentions: We introduced Hugvie into storytime sessions in the elementary school event to 139 preschool children who are 5 or 6 years old. They were divided the children into 34 groups of three to five kids with two or three 5th graders as guides of the school. Each group could freely join several sessions (including storytime) in the event. This study was approved by the ethics committee of the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (Kyoto, Japan). We explained our study to all of the children's parents and received informed consent from them. In the storytime events at the school's library, they were given Hugvies and instructed how to use them by showing the correct posture as described in case study 1. We confirmed that all children could comfortably hear the experimenter's voice from their Hugvies. After that the 5th graders told stories with picture books to the preschool children for 10 min (Figure 6). At most four groups of storytime were held at the same time in the same room. The other groups waited in the room until some of the four groups had finished and moved on to other events.

Bottom Line: Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers.Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators.We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent Robotics Laboratory, Graduated School of Engineering Science, Osaka UniversityToyonaka, Japan; Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunication Research Institute InternationalKyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we propose the introduction of human-like communication media as a proxy for teachers to support the listening of children in school education. Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers. We investigate the effect of Hugvie on children's listening and how they and their teachers react to it through observations and interviews. Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators. We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

No MeSH data available.