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Impact of Mediated Intimate Interaction on Education: A Huggable Communication Medium that Encourages Listening.

Nakanishi J, Sumioka H, Ishiguro H - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers.Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators.We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent Robotics Laboratory, Graduated School of Engineering Science, Osaka UniversityToyonaka, Japan; Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunication Research Institute InternationalKyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we propose the introduction of human-like communication media as a proxy for teachers to support the listening of children in school education. Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers. We investigate the effect of Hugvie on children's listening and how they and their teachers react to it through observations and interviews. Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators. We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rate of children who directed their faces at something other than volunteers.
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Figure 3: Rate of children who directed their faces at something other than volunteers.

Mentions: Hugvie produced big changes in the children's behaviors. Figure 3 shows the listening scores in the typical and Hugvie conditions. We found significant differences between them with a paired t-test (t = −6.83, p < 0.001, ES: d = 1.27). Figures 4, 5 show the typical behaviors of children whose attention was drawn to something else in the two conditions. In the typical condition, some children walked around the room and talked or played with others after losing interest in the storytellers. The children who were far from the storytellers tended to engage in such behavior. On the other hand, such behaviors did not occur when children used Hugvie, although a few children looked away from the storyteller. Interestingly, the children at the back of the room seemed to listen to the volunteers' voices from Hugvies without any complaints even though they had difficulty seeing the picture cards.


Impact of Mediated Intimate Interaction on Education: A Huggable Communication Medium that Encourages Listening.

Nakanishi J, Sumioka H, Ishiguro H - Front Psychol (2016)

Rate of children who directed their faces at something other than volunteers.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835693&req=5

Figure 3: Rate of children who directed their faces at something other than volunteers.
Mentions: Hugvie produced big changes in the children's behaviors. Figure 3 shows the listening scores in the typical and Hugvie conditions. We found significant differences between them with a paired t-test (t = −6.83, p < 0.001, ES: d = 1.27). Figures 4, 5 show the typical behaviors of children whose attention was drawn to something else in the two conditions. In the typical condition, some children walked around the room and talked or played with others after losing interest in the storytellers. The children who were far from the storytellers tended to engage in such behavior. On the other hand, such behaviors did not occur when children used Hugvie, although a few children looked away from the storyteller. Interestingly, the children at the back of the room seemed to listen to the volunteers' voices from Hugvies without any complaints even though they had difficulty seeing the picture cards.

Bottom Line: Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers.Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators.We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent Robotics Laboratory, Graduated School of Engineering Science, Osaka UniversityToyonaka, Japan; Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunication Research Institute InternationalKyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we propose the introduction of human-like communication media as a proxy for teachers to support the listening of children in school education. Three case studies are presented on storytime fieldwork for children using our huggable communication medium called Hugvie, through which children are encouraged to concentrate on listening by intimate interaction between children and storytellers. We investigate the effect of Hugvie on children's listening and how they and their teachers react to it through observations and interviews. Our results suggest that Hugvie increased the number of children who concentrated on listening to a story and was welcomed by almost all the children and educators. We also discuss improvement and research issues to introduce huggable communication media into classrooms, potential applications, and their contributions to other education situations through improved listening.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus