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A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child.

Lee YJ, Hwang JY, Cho YH, Kim YW, Kim TU, Shin DH - Iran J Radiol (2016)

Bottom Line: Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding.We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings.Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University Children's Hospital, Pusan National University, School of Medicine, Yangsan, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultrasonography of the small bowel of a three-year-old girl presenting with anemia. A, 2D gray-scale image depicting bowel wall thickening with multiple cystic locules (arrows). The bowel lumen (L) was patent; B, Pseudo-flow artifact was provoked when the lesion was compressed by a sonographic probe; C, Oblique coronal reformatted arterial phase computed tomography (CT) image showing segmental bowel wall thickening involving the middle layer of the jejunum (arrows); D, Portovenous phase CT image revealing the multifocal contrast-filling spaces at the thickened bowel wall (arrowheads); E and F, CT angiography with maximum intensity projection (MIP) images showing no engorged mesenteric vessel on arterial and portovenous phases. Note the contrast filling spaces on portovenous phase (arrowheads).
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fig26354: Ultrasonography of the small bowel of a three-year-old girl presenting with anemia. A, 2D gray-scale image depicting bowel wall thickening with multiple cystic locules (arrows). The bowel lumen (L) was patent; B, Pseudo-flow artifact was provoked when the lesion was compressed by a sonographic probe; C, Oblique coronal reformatted arterial phase computed tomography (CT) image showing segmental bowel wall thickening involving the middle layer of the jejunum (arrows); D, Portovenous phase CT image revealing the multifocal contrast-filling spaces at the thickened bowel wall (arrowheads); E and F, CT angiography with maximum intensity projection (MIP) images showing no engorged mesenteric vessel on arterial and portovenous phases. Note the contrast filling spaces on portovenous phase (arrowheads).

Mentions: US revealed a 10 cm long segmental and circumferential bowel wall thickening at the left lower quadrant of the abdomen. Numerous cystic locules that did not exceed 1 cm in diameter were identified in the thickened bowel wall (Figure 1A). Several locules showed internal echogenic debris, but the majority contained clear anechoic fluid. The echogenic mucosal lining of the involved bowel segment was well preserved. There was no phlebolith apparent on a 2D grayscale image. On a color Doppler study, the cystic locules did not reveal internal vascular flow. Pseudo-flow artifact was present when the lesion was compressed by the US probe (Figure 1B).


A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child.

Lee YJ, Hwang JY, Cho YH, Kim YW, Kim TU, Shin DH - Iran J Radiol (2016)

Ultrasonography of the small bowel of a three-year-old girl presenting with anemia. A, 2D gray-scale image depicting bowel wall thickening with multiple cystic locules (arrows). The bowel lumen (L) was patent; B, Pseudo-flow artifact was provoked when the lesion was compressed by a sonographic probe; C, Oblique coronal reformatted arterial phase computed tomography (CT) image showing segmental bowel wall thickening involving the middle layer of the jejunum (arrows); D, Portovenous phase CT image revealing the multifocal contrast-filling spaces at the thickened bowel wall (arrowheads); E and F, CT angiography with maximum intensity projection (MIP) images showing no engorged mesenteric vessel on arterial and portovenous phases. Note the contrast filling spaces on portovenous phase (arrowheads).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835636&req=5

fig26354: Ultrasonography of the small bowel of a three-year-old girl presenting with anemia. A, 2D gray-scale image depicting bowel wall thickening with multiple cystic locules (arrows). The bowel lumen (L) was patent; B, Pseudo-flow artifact was provoked when the lesion was compressed by a sonographic probe; C, Oblique coronal reformatted arterial phase computed tomography (CT) image showing segmental bowel wall thickening involving the middle layer of the jejunum (arrows); D, Portovenous phase CT image revealing the multifocal contrast-filling spaces at the thickened bowel wall (arrowheads); E and F, CT angiography with maximum intensity projection (MIP) images showing no engorged mesenteric vessel on arterial and portovenous phases. Note the contrast filling spaces on portovenous phase (arrowheads).
Mentions: US revealed a 10 cm long segmental and circumferential bowel wall thickening at the left lower quadrant of the abdomen. Numerous cystic locules that did not exceed 1 cm in diameter were identified in the thickened bowel wall (Figure 1A). Several locules showed internal echogenic debris, but the majority contained clear anechoic fluid. The echogenic mucosal lining of the involved bowel segment was well preserved. There was no phlebolith apparent on a 2D grayscale image. On a color Doppler study, the cystic locules did not reveal internal vascular flow. Pseudo-flow artifact was present when the lesion was compressed by the US probe (Figure 1B).

Bottom Line: Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding.We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings.Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University Children's Hospital, Pusan National University, School of Medicine, Yangsan, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus