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The Effects of Alcohol on Visual Evoked Potential and Multifocal Electroretinography.

Kim JT, Yun CM, Kim SW, Oh J, Huh K - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2016)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of ethanol administration on pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG).However, the changes did not show statistical significance after Bonferroni correction.In conclusion, orally administrated ethanol (0.75 g/kg) appears to suppress the central nervous system, but it is not clear whether alcohol intake affects the retina.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea .

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of ethanol administration on pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Fifteen healthy subjects with no ocular or general disease were recruited. VEP (0.25° pattern sizes) and mfERG with 19 elements in two recording segments were performed before ethanol administration to obtain baseline for each participant. A few days later, the participants visited again for VEP and mfERG measurements after ethanol administration. Ethanol (0.75 g/kg) was administered orally over the course of 30 minutes. VEP and blood alcohol concentration were evaluated one hour after ethanol administration, and mfERG was conducted after pupil dilation. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare parameter changes after randomized eye selection. The mean blood alcohol concentration was 0.034% ± 0.05% by volume. VEP revealed a P100 latency delay (109.4 ± 5.3; 113.1 ± 8.2; P = 0.008) after alcohol administration. The P1 implicit time of ring 1 on mfERG showed a trend of shortening after alcohol administration (37.9 ± 1.0; 37.2 ± 1.5; P = 0.048). However, the changes did not show statistical significance after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, orally administrated ethanol (0.75 g/kg) appears to suppress the central nervous system, but it is not clear whether alcohol intake affects the retina.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot of parameters of VEP and mfERG before versus after alcohol administration. VEP N75, P100, N135 latency, VEP N75-P100, P100-N135 amplitude before versus after alcohol administration (first row). P1 amplitude, P1 implicit time, N1 amplitude and N1 implicit time of mfERG Ring 1 (R1: second row), Ring 2 (R2: third row) and Ring 3 (R3: fourth row).Alc, alcohol; Lat, latency; Amp, amplitude; Imp, implicit time; R, ring; ms, mili-second; µV, micro-volt.
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Figure 2: Scatter plot of parameters of VEP and mfERG before versus after alcohol administration. VEP N75, P100, N135 latency, VEP N75-P100, P100-N135 amplitude before versus after alcohol administration (first row). P1 amplitude, P1 implicit time, N1 amplitude and N1 implicit time of mfERG Ring 1 (R1: second row), Ring 2 (R2: third row) and Ring 3 (R3: fourth row).Alc, alcohol; Lat, latency; Amp, amplitude; Imp, implicit time; R, ring; ms, mili-second; µV, micro-volt.

Mentions: The P100 latency in the VEP increased significantly, from 109.4 ± 5.3 milliseconds (ms) to 113.1 ± 8.2 ms (P = 0.008). However, the P100 amplitude did not change significantly. The N135 amplitude and latency also did not show significant changes (Table 2). There was a trend of the shortening of P1 implicit time of ring 1 on the mfERG after alcohol administration, from 37.9 ± 1.0 ms to 37.2 ± 1.5 ms. However, the changes did not show statistically significance after Bonferroni correction. No significant changes were noted in the other parameters, including the P1 and N1 amplitudes and the N1 implicit time of the three concentric rings (Table 2). Correlation between BAC and the delta ratio of parameters also did not show significant changes (Table 3). Scatter plots of VEP and mfERG parameters before versus after alcohol administration are shown in Fig. 2.


The Effects of Alcohol on Visual Evoked Potential and Multifocal Electroretinography.

Kim JT, Yun CM, Kim SW, Oh J, Huh K - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2016)

Scatter plot of parameters of VEP and mfERG before versus after alcohol administration. VEP N75, P100, N135 latency, VEP N75-P100, P100-N135 amplitude before versus after alcohol administration (first row). P1 amplitude, P1 implicit time, N1 amplitude and N1 implicit time of mfERG Ring 1 (R1: second row), Ring 2 (R2: third row) and Ring 3 (R3: fourth row).Alc, alcohol; Lat, latency; Amp, amplitude; Imp, implicit time; R, ring; ms, mili-second; µV, micro-volt.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835606&req=5

Figure 2: Scatter plot of parameters of VEP and mfERG before versus after alcohol administration. VEP N75, P100, N135 latency, VEP N75-P100, P100-N135 amplitude before versus after alcohol administration (first row). P1 amplitude, P1 implicit time, N1 amplitude and N1 implicit time of mfERG Ring 1 (R1: second row), Ring 2 (R2: third row) and Ring 3 (R3: fourth row).Alc, alcohol; Lat, latency; Amp, amplitude; Imp, implicit time; R, ring; ms, mili-second; µV, micro-volt.
Mentions: The P100 latency in the VEP increased significantly, from 109.4 ± 5.3 milliseconds (ms) to 113.1 ± 8.2 ms (P = 0.008). However, the P100 amplitude did not change significantly. The N135 amplitude and latency also did not show significant changes (Table 2). There was a trend of the shortening of P1 implicit time of ring 1 on the mfERG after alcohol administration, from 37.9 ± 1.0 ms to 37.2 ± 1.5 ms. However, the changes did not show statistically significance after Bonferroni correction. No significant changes were noted in the other parameters, including the P1 and N1 amplitudes and the N1 implicit time of the three concentric rings (Table 2). Correlation between BAC and the delta ratio of parameters also did not show significant changes (Table 3). Scatter plots of VEP and mfERG parameters before versus after alcohol administration are shown in Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of ethanol administration on pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG).However, the changes did not show statistical significance after Bonferroni correction.In conclusion, orally administrated ethanol (0.75 g/kg) appears to suppress the central nervous system, but it is not clear whether alcohol intake affects the retina.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea .

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of ethanol administration on pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Fifteen healthy subjects with no ocular or general disease were recruited. VEP (0.25° pattern sizes) and mfERG with 19 elements in two recording segments were performed before ethanol administration to obtain baseline for each participant. A few days later, the participants visited again for VEP and mfERG measurements after ethanol administration. Ethanol (0.75 g/kg) was administered orally over the course of 30 minutes. VEP and blood alcohol concentration were evaluated one hour after ethanol administration, and mfERG was conducted after pupil dilation. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare parameter changes after randomized eye selection. The mean blood alcohol concentration was 0.034% ± 0.05% by volume. VEP revealed a P100 latency delay (109.4 ± 5.3; 113.1 ± 8.2; P = 0.008) after alcohol administration. The P1 implicit time of ring 1 on mfERG showed a trend of shortening after alcohol administration (37.9 ± 1.0; 37.2 ± 1.5; P = 0.048). However, the changes did not show statistical significance after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, orally administrated ethanol (0.75 g/kg) appears to suppress the central nervous system, but it is not clear whether alcohol intake affects the retina.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus