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Knowledge and Perception about Clinical Research Shapes Behavior: Face to Face Survey in Korean General Public.

Choi YJ, Beck SH, Kang WY, Yoo S, Kim SY, Lee JS, Burt T, Kim TW - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2016)

Bottom Line: Treatment benefit was the single most influential reason for participation, followed by financial gain.Concern about safety was the main reason for refusal, succeeded by fear and lack of trust.Public awareness and educational programs addressing these negative perceptions and lack of knowledge will be effective in enhancing public engaged in clinical research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Asan Medical Center, Clinical Trial Center, Seoul, Korea .

ABSTRACT
Considering general public as potential patients, identifying factors that hinder public participation poses great importance, especially in a research environment where demands for clinical trial participants outpace the supply. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge and perception about clinical research in general public. A total of 400 Seoul residents with no previous experience of clinical trial participation were selected, as representative of population in Seoul in terms of age and sex. To minimize selection bias, every fifth passer-by was invited to interview, and if in a cluster, person on the very right side was asked. To ensure the uniform use of survey, written instructions have been added to the questionnaire. Followed by pilot test in 40 subjects, the survey was administered face-to-face in December 2014. To investigate how perception shapes behavior, we compared perception scores in those who expressed willingness to participate and those who did not. Remarkably higher percentage of responders stated that they have heard of clinical research, and knew someone who participated (both, P < 0.001) compared to India. Yet, the percentage of responders expressed willingness to participate was 39.3%, a significantly lower rate than the result of the India (58.9% vs. 39.3%, P < 0.001). Treatment benefit was the single most influential reason for participation, followed by financial gain. Concern about safety was the main reason for refusal, succeeded by fear and lack of trust. Public awareness and educational programs addressing these negative perceptions and lack of knowledge will be effective in enhancing public engaged in clinical research.

No MeSH data available.


Reason for participation (multiple responses).
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Figure 1: Reason for participation (multiple responses).

Mentions: No notable differences in the reasons given for clinical research participation were seen between the two groups (Fig. 1). The proportion of subjects who gave altruism, or treatment/medical benefits, as the reason for participation in clinical research was lower in the subjects not willing to participate than in those willing to participate, and financial gain, and being obliged to do so was higher among those not willing to participate. Treatment benefit was the single most influential reason for participation, followed by financial gain. The reasons for refusal were similar in the “heard” and “not heard” group, except for lack of knowledge (Fig. 2). The proportion of subjects who gave lack of time or lack of opportunity as the reason for refusal was lower among the “not willing” subjects while lack of trust, fear, and not caring were higher among these subjects. Thus, concerns about safety was the main reason for refusal, followed by fear and lack of trust.


Knowledge and Perception about Clinical Research Shapes Behavior: Face to Face Survey in Korean General Public.

Choi YJ, Beck SH, Kang WY, Yoo S, Kim SY, Lee JS, Burt T, Kim TW - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2016)

Reason for participation (multiple responses).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835590&req=5

Figure 1: Reason for participation (multiple responses).
Mentions: No notable differences in the reasons given for clinical research participation were seen between the two groups (Fig. 1). The proportion of subjects who gave altruism, or treatment/medical benefits, as the reason for participation in clinical research was lower in the subjects not willing to participate than in those willing to participate, and financial gain, and being obliged to do so was higher among those not willing to participate. Treatment benefit was the single most influential reason for participation, followed by financial gain. The reasons for refusal were similar in the “heard” and “not heard” group, except for lack of knowledge (Fig. 2). The proportion of subjects who gave lack of time or lack of opportunity as the reason for refusal was lower among the “not willing” subjects while lack of trust, fear, and not caring were higher among these subjects. Thus, concerns about safety was the main reason for refusal, followed by fear and lack of trust.

Bottom Line: Treatment benefit was the single most influential reason for participation, followed by financial gain.Concern about safety was the main reason for refusal, succeeded by fear and lack of trust.Public awareness and educational programs addressing these negative perceptions and lack of knowledge will be effective in enhancing public engaged in clinical research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Asan Medical Center, Clinical Trial Center, Seoul, Korea .

ABSTRACT
Considering general public as potential patients, identifying factors that hinder public participation poses great importance, especially in a research environment where demands for clinical trial participants outpace the supply. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge and perception about clinical research in general public. A total of 400 Seoul residents with no previous experience of clinical trial participation were selected, as representative of population in Seoul in terms of age and sex. To minimize selection bias, every fifth passer-by was invited to interview, and if in a cluster, person on the very right side was asked. To ensure the uniform use of survey, written instructions have been added to the questionnaire. Followed by pilot test in 40 subjects, the survey was administered face-to-face in December 2014. To investigate how perception shapes behavior, we compared perception scores in those who expressed willingness to participate and those who did not. Remarkably higher percentage of responders stated that they have heard of clinical research, and knew someone who participated (both, P < 0.001) compared to India. Yet, the percentage of responders expressed willingness to participate was 39.3%, a significantly lower rate than the result of the India (58.9% vs. 39.3%, P < 0.001). Treatment benefit was the single most influential reason for participation, followed by financial gain. Concern about safety was the main reason for refusal, succeeded by fear and lack of trust. Public awareness and educational programs addressing these negative perceptions and lack of knowledge will be effective in enhancing public engaged in clinical research.

No MeSH data available.