Limits...
Safety of artemisinins in first trimester of prospectively followed pregnancies: an observational study.

Moore KA, Simpson JA, Paw MK, Pimanpanarak M, Wiladphaingern J, Rijken MJ, Jittamala P, White NJ, Fowkes FJ, Nosten F, McGready R - Lancet Infect Dis (2016)

Bottom Line: Artemisinins, the most effective antimalarials available, are not recommended for falciparum malaria during the first trimester of pregnancy because of safety concerns.Therefore, quinine is used despite its poor effectiveness.We noted no evidence of an increased risk of miscarriage or of major congenital malformations associated with first-line treatment with an artemisinin derivative compared with quinine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: kerrynmoore.kam@burnet.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study profileP vivax=Plasmodium vivax. P malariae=Plasmodium malariae. P ovale=Plasmodium ovale. P falciparum=Plasmodium falciparum.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835584&req=5

fig1: Study profileP vivax=Plasmodium vivax. P malariae=Plasmodium malariae. P ovale=Plasmodium ovale. P falciparum=Plasmodium falciparum.

Mentions: Between Jan 1, 1994 and Dec 31, 2013, 55 636 pregnant women presented to SMRU clinics, of whom 25 485 (46%) presented during their first trimester with a viable fetus (figure 1). Of these, 2257 (10%) of 23 118 miscarried, 2367 (9%) of 25 485 were lost to follow-up before 28 weeks gestation, and 2558 (10%) of 25 485 had first-trimester malaria (figure 1). Women with first-trimester malaria were more likely to miscarry or be lost to follow-up and tended to present for antenatal care earlier, be younger, be primigravid, and smoke compared with women without first-trimester malaria (all p<0·0001; table 1).


Safety of artemisinins in first trimester of prospectively followed pregnancies: an observational study.

Moore KA, Simpson JA, Paw MK, Pimanpanarak M, Wiladphaingern J, Rijken MJ, Jittamala P, White NJ, Fowkes FJ, Nosten F, McGready R - Lancet Infect Dis (2016)

Study profileP vivax=Plasmodium vivax. P malariae=Plasmodium malariae. P ovale=Plasmodium ovale. P falciparum=Plasmodium falciparum.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835584&req=5

fig1: Study profileP vivax=Plasmodium vivax. P malariae=Plasmodium malariae. P ovale=Plasmodium ovale. P falciparum=Plasmodium falciparum.
Mentions: Between Jan 1, 1994 and Dec 31, 2013, 55 636 pregnant women presented to SMRU clinics, of whom 25 485 (46%) presented during their first trimester with a viable fetus (figure 1). Of these, 2257 (10%) of 23 118 miscarried, 2367 (9%) of 25 485 were lost to follow-up before 28 weeks gestation, and 2558 (10%) of 25 485 had first-trimester malaria (figure 1). Women with first-trimester malaria were more likely to miscarry or be lost to follow-up and tended to present for antenatal care earlier, be younger, be primigravid, and smoke compared with women without first-trimester malaria (all p<0·0001; table 1).

Bottom Line: Artemisinins, the most effective antimalarials available, are not recommended for falciparum malaria during the first trimester of pregnancy because of safety concerns.Therefore, quinine is used despite its poor effectiveness.We noted no evidence of an increased risk of miscarriage or of major congenital malformations associated with first-line treatment with an artemisinin derivative compared with quinine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: kerrynmoore.kam@burnet.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus