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A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

van Laarhoven KA, Huinink HP, Adan OC - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH.However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered.These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) The initial moments in time when conidiation became visible in the microscope's FOV (Fig. 3C) on samples that were exposed to a period of RHmin for Δt. The first observation of conidiation was measured with respect to t = 0, the time of inoculation. Circles mark the times at which the first conidiophores were observed in individual movies, bars mark the average value. The cases Δt = 0 h and Δt = 1 h were not significantly different, but the case of Δt = 24 h was statistically different from both (Welch's one‐way ANOVA, F2,10 = 32, P = 3.7e‐5 and Games‐Howell post hoc tests, P = 0.05). The amount of data points per RHmin was too small for further statistical analysis. The black area on a bar indicates the period of low RH. (B) The times at which individual hyphae became visible when a 24 h period of lower RH was applied 48 h after inoculation, grouped per RHmin. The vertical bar indicates the period of low RH.
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mbt212357-fig-0007: (A) The initial moments in time when conidiation became visible in the microscope's FOV (Fig. 3C) on samples that were exposed to a period of RHmin for Δt. The first observation of conidiation was measured with respect to t = 0, the time of inoculation. Circles mark the times at which the first conidiophores were observed in individual movies, bars mark the average value. The cases Δt = 0 h and Δt = 1 h were not significantly different, but the case of Δt = 24 h was statistically different from both (Welch's one‐way ANOVA, F2,10 = 32, P = 3.7e‐5 and Games‐Howell post hoc tests, P = 0.05). The amount of data points per RHmin was too small for further statistical analysis. The black area on a bar indicates the period of low RH. (B) The times at which individual hyphae became visible when a 24 h period of lower RH was applied 48 h after inoculation, grouped per RHmin. The vertical bar indicates the period of low RH.

Mentions: The times when conidiation was observed in each movie were collected and shown in Fig. 7A. The data are grouped by RHmin and Δt; the moment of conidiation for growth at steady‐state RH = 97% is included as well. Comparison of the average conidiation times for Δt = 24 h, Δt = 1 h and Δt = 0 h (steady‐state) shows no significant difference between the cases of Δt = 1 h and Δt = 0 h, but also shows that conidiation is significantly delayed in the case of Δt = 24 h compared with both other cases (Welch's one‐way ANOVA, F2,10 = 32, P = 3.7e‐5 and Games‐Howell post hoc tests, P = 0.05).


A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

van Laarhoven KA, Huinink HP, Adan OC - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

(A) The initial moments in time when conidiation became visible in the microscope's FOV (Fig. 3C) on samples that were exposed to a period of RHmin for Δt. The first observation of conidiation was measured with respect to t = 0, the time of inoculation. Circles mark the times at which the first conidiophores were observed in individual movies, bars mark the average value. The cases Δt = 0 h and Δt = 1 h were not significantly different, but the case of Δt = 24 h was statistically different from both (Welch's one‐way ANOVA, F2,10 = 32, P = 3.7e‐5 and Games‐Howell post hoc tests, P = 0.05). The amount of data points per RHmin was too small for further statistical analysis. The black area on a bar indicates the period of low RH. (B) The times at which individual hyphae became visible when a 24 h period of lower RH was applied 48 h after inoculation, grouped per RHmin. The vertical bar indicates the period of low RH.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835577&req=5

mbt212357-fig-0007: (A) The initial moments in time when conidiation became visible in the microscope's FOV (Fig. 3C) on samples that were exposed to a period of RHmin for Δt. The first observation of conidiation was measured with respect to t = 0, the time of inoculation. Circles mark the times at which the first conidiophores were observed in individual movies, bars mark the average value. The cases Δt = 0 h and Δt = 1 h were not significantly different, but the case of Δt = 24 h was statistically different from both (Welch's one‐way ANOVA, F2,10 = 32, P = 3.7e‐5 and Games‐Howell post hoc tests, P = 0.05). The amount of data points per RHmin was too small for further statistical analysis. The black area on a bar indicates the period of low RH. (B) The times at which individual hyphae became visible when a 24 h period of lower RH was applied 48 h after inoculation, grouped per RHmin. The vertical bar indicates the period of low RH.
Mentions: The times when conidiation was observed in each movie were collected and shown in Fig. 7A. The data are grouped by RHmin and Δt; the moment of conidiation for growth at steady‐state RH = 97% is included as well. Comparison of the average conidiation times for Δt = 24 h, Δt = 1 h and Δt = 0 h (steady‐state) shows no significant difference between the cases of Δt = 1 h and Δt = 0 h, but also shows that conidiation is significantly delayed in the case of Δt = 24 h compared with both other cases (Welch's one‐way ANOVA, F2,10 = 32, P = 3.7e‐5 and Games‐Howell post hoc tests, P = 0.05).

Bottom Line: It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH.However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered.These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus