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Growing media constituents determine the microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media for horticulture.

Grunert O, Reheul D, Van Labeke MC, Perneel M, Hernandez-Sanabria E, Vlaeminck SE, Boon N - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: Interestingly, mixing of the growing media constituents resulted in a stimulation of the function of the microorganisms.The use of organic fertilizer resulted in an increase in amoA gene copy number by factor 100 compared to inorganic fertilizers.Our results support our hypothesis that the activity of the functional microbial community with respect to nitrogen turnover in an organic growing medium can be improved by selecting and mixing the appropriate growing media components with each other.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, Gent, 9000, Belgium.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nitrogen transformation rates by growing media constituent and blends and N treatment. Bars represent standard deviation of triplicate samples. Different letters above the bars indicate a significant difference (P ≤ 0.05).
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mbt212354-fig-0001: Nitrogen transformation rates by growing media constituent and blends and N treatment. Bars represent standard deviation of triplicate samples. Different letters above the bars indicate a significant difference (P ≤ 0.05).

Mentions: Batch activity tests were performed during 37 days. The ureolysis, the ammonia oxidation and the nitrite oxidation rates are influenced by the growing media constituent and the nitrogen form (urea, ammonium, nitrite and nitrate) used (Fig. 1). The ureolysis (P = 0.016), the ammonia oxidation (P = 0.015) and the nitrite oxidation rate (P = 0.014) were significantly different between growing media constituents. Urea hydrolysis ranged between 162.4 ± 17.1 mg N kg−1 day−1 and 85.6 ± 19.7 mg N kg−1 day−1. Sod peat showed the highest and Irish peat the lowest rate of ureolysis. Ammonia oxidation rate ranged between 86.9 ± 9.9 mg N kg−1 day−1 and 1.0 ± 0.9 mg N kg−1 day−1 and was the highest in compost and the lowest in coconut fibre. Nitrite oxidation rate was the highest in compost (83.8 ± 1.3 mg N kg−1 day−1) and lowest in the Sod peat (8.4 ± 6.2 mg N kg−1 day−1). When growing media constituents were mixed, ammonia oxidation rate increased from 41 to 83 mg N kg−1 day−1 and nitrite oxidation rate increased from 15 to 63 mg N kg−1 day−1.


Growing media constituents determine the microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media for horticulture.

Grunert O, Reheul D, Van Labeke MC, Perneel M, Hernandez-Sanabria E, Vlaeminck SE, Boon N - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Nitrogen transformation rates by growing media constituent and blends and N treatment. Bars represent standard deviation of triplicate samples. Different letters above the bars indicate a significant difference (P ≤ 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835575&req=5

mbt212354-fig-0001: Nitrogen transformation rates by growing media constituent and blends and N treatment. Bars represent standard deviation of triplicate samples. Different letters above the bars indicate a significant difference (P ≤ 0.05).
Mentions: Batch activity tests were performed during 37 days. The ureolysis, the ammonia oxidation and the nitrite oxidation rates are influenced by the growing media constituent and the nitrogen form (urea, ammonium, nitrite and nitrate) used (Fig. 1). The ureolysis (P = 0.016), the ammonia oxidation (P = 0.015) and the nitrite oxidation rate (P = 0.014) were significantly different between growing media constituents. Urea hydrolysis ranged between 162.4 ± 17.1 mg N kg−1 day−1 and 85.6 ± 19.7 mg N kg−1 day−1. Sod peat showed the highest and Irish peat the lowest rate of ureolysis. Ammonia oxidation rate ranged between 86.9 ± 9.9 mg N kg−1 day−1 and 1.0 ± 0.9 mg N kg−1 day−1 and was the highest in compost and the lowest in coconut fibre. Nitrite oxidation rate was the highest in compost (83.8 ± 1.3 mg N kg−1 day−1) and lowest in the Sod peat (8.4 ± 6.2 mg N kg−1 day−1). When growing media constituents were mixed, ammonia oxidation rate increased from 41 to 83 mg N kg−1 day−1 and nitrite oxidation rate increased from 15 to 63 mg N kg−1 day−1.

Bottom Line: Interestingly, mixing of the growing media constituents resulted in a stimulation of the function of the microorganisms.The use of organic fertilizer resulted in an increase in amoA gene copy number by factor 100 compared to inorganic fertilizers.Our results support our hypothesis that the activity of the functional microbial community with respect to nitrogen turnover in an organic growing medium can be improved by selecting and mixing the appropriate growing media components with each other.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, Gent, 9000, Belgium.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus