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Stimulating soil microorganisms for mineralizing the herbicide isoproturon by means of microbial electroremediating cells.

Rodrigo Quejigo J, Dörfler U, Schroll R, Esteve-Núñez A - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: Microbial electroremediating cells (MERCs) consist in a variety of bioelectrochemical devices that aim to overcome electron acceptor limitation and maximize metabolic oxidation with the purpose of enhancing the biodegradation of a pollutant in the environment.The objective of this work was to use MERCs principles for stimulating soil bacteria to achieve the complete biodegradation of the herbicide (14) C-isoproturon (IPU) to (14) CO(2) in soils.The remarkable impact of electrodes on the microbial activity of natural communities suggests a promising future for this emerging environmental technology that we propose to name bioelectroventing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scheme of a pol‐MERC. The anode was polarized at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl [+197 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode (NHE)]. 14CO2 was trapped in a 0.1 N NaOH solution for allowing the measurement of 14C‐IPU.
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mbt212351-fig-0005: Scheme of a pol‐MERC. The anode was polarized at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl [+197 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode (NHE)]. 14CO2 was trapped in a 0.1 N NaOH solution for allowing the measurement of 14C‐IPU.

Mentions: Microbial electroremediating cells were assembled in the laboratory system (Fig. 5). The electrode used in this experiment was carbon felt (Sofacel, Barcelona, Spain), as it showed no IPU adsorption (Figs. S1 and S2) and very adequate mechanical properties to conform the system. Although a diversity of electrode materials can serve as an electron acceptor for microbial respiration, carbon felt as graphite can provide a low‐cost, low‐maintenance, continuous sink for electrons as it does not corrode or otherwise degrade during long‐term deployments (Reimers et al., 2006; Tender et al., 2008) so it is easy to remove from the soil after the treatment, showing a low impact for the environment. The electrodes were allocated at the bottom of the soil layer (anode) and above the water body (cathode). The geometrical area of the electrodes was 39 cm2 (surface area: 0.7 m2 g−1).


Stimulating soil microorganisms for mineralizing the herbicide isoproturon by means of microbial electroremediating cells.

Rodrigo Quejigo J, Dörfler U, Schroll R, Esteve-Núñez A - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Scheme of a pol‐MERC. The anode was polarized at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl [+197 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode (NHE)]. 14CO2 was trapped in a 0.1 N NaOH solution for allowing the measurement of 14C‐IPU.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835573&req=5

mbt212351-fig-0005: Scheme of a pol‐MERC. The anode was polarized at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl [+197 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode (NHE)]. 14CO2 was trapped in a 0.1 N NaOH solution for allowing the measurement of 14C‐IPU.
Mentions: Microbial electroremediating cells were assembled in the laboratory system (Fig. 5). The electrode used in this experiment was carbon felt (Sofacel, Barcelona, Spain), as it showed no IPU adsorption (Figs. S1 and S2) and very adequate mechanical properties to conform the system. Although a diversity of electrode materials can serve as an electron acceptor for microbial respiration, carbon felt as graphite can provide a low‐cost, low‐maintenance, continuous sink for electrons as it does not corrode or otherwise degrade during long‐term deployments (Reimers et al., 2006; Tender et al., 2008) so it is easy to remove from the soil after the treatment, showing a low impact for the environment. The electrodes were allocated at the bottom of the soil layer (anode) and above the water body (cathode). The geometrical area of the electrodes was 39 cm2 (surface area: 0.7 m2 g−1).

Bottom Line: Microbial electroremediating cells (MERCs) consist in a variety of bioelectrochemical devices that aim to overcome electron acceptor limitation and maximize metabolic oxidation with the purpose of enhancing the biodegradation of a pollutant in the environment.The objective of this work was to use MERCs principles for stimulating soil bacteria to achieve the complete biodegradation of the herbicide (14) C-isoproturon (IPU) to (14) CO(2) in soils.The remarkable impact of electrodes on the microbial activity of natural communities suggests a promising future for this emerging environmental technology that we propose to name bioelectroventing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus