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Stimulating soil microorganisms for mineralizing the herbicide isoproturon by means of microbial electroremediating cells.

Rodrigo Quejigo J, Dörfler U, Schroll R, Esteve-Núñez A - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: Microbial electroremediating cells (MERCs) consist in a variety of bioelectrochemical devices that aim to overcome electron acceptor limitation and maximize metabolic oxidation with the purpose of enhancing the biodegradation of a pollutant in the environment.The objective of this work was to use MERCs principles for stimulating soil bacteria to achieve the complete biodegradation of the herbicide (14) C-isoproturon (IPU) to (14) CO(2) in soils.The remarkable impact of electrodes on the microbial activity of natural communities suggests a promising future for this emerging environmental technology that we propose to name bioelectroventing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed biodegradation pathways for IPU under polarized‐MERCs conditions.
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mbt212351-fig-0004: Proposed biodegradation pathways for IPU under polarized‐MERCs conditions.

Mentions: The two most abundant metabolites were obtained after demethylation of the N,N‐dimethylurea side‐chain to generate MDIPU and DD‐IPU (Fig. 4, steps 1 and 2). MDIPU has been previously reported to be the most abundant metabolite after IPU biotransformation in agricultural soils, as well as in pure cultures assays by soil fungi and bacteria (Sørensen et al., 2003). Moreover, the abundance levels for MDIPU in pol‐MERCs extracts were ca. five‐fold higher than in environments under negative redox potential like the electrode‐free control. On the contrary, the abundance of IPU in pol‐MERCs extracts was ca. fivefold lower, going down the concentration from the initial 5 (±0.1) μg g−1 dry soil to 0.179 μg g−1 dry soil, while under electrode‐free control, the decrease reached only 1.9 (±0.006) μg g−1 dry soil. These concentrations were calculated based on the 14C chromatograms from the HPLC (coupled to a radioactivity detector) and the specific radioactivity of our standard applied in the soil (radioactivity per unit mass of the stated compound).


Stimulating soil microorganisms for mineralizing the herbicide isoproturon by means of microbial electroremediating cells.

Rodrigo Quejigo J, Dörfler U, Schroll R, Esteve-Núñez A - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Proposed biodegradation pathways for IPU under polarized‐MERCs conditions.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835573&req=5

mbt212351-fig-0004: Proposed biodegradation pathways for IPU under polarized‐MERCs conditions.
Mentions: The two most abundant metabolites were obtained after demethylation of the N,N‐dimethylurea side‐chain to generate MDIPU and DD‐IPU (Fig. 4, steps 1 and 2). MDIPU has been previously reported to be the most abundant metabolite after IPU biotransformation in agricultural soils, as well as in pure cultures assays by soil fungi and bacteria (Sørensen et al., 2003). Moreover, the abundance levels for MDIPU in pol‐MERCs extracts were ca. five‐fold higher than in environments under negative redox potential like the electrode‐free control. On the contrary, the abundance of IPU in pol‐MERCs extracts was ca. fivefold lower, going down the concentration from the initial 5 (±0.1) μg g−1 dry soil to 0.179 μg g−1 dry soil, while under electrode‐free control, the decrease reached only 1.9 (±0.006) μg g−1 dry soil. These concentrations were calculated based on the 14C chromatograms from the HPLC (coupled to a radioactivity detector) and the specific radioactivity of our standard applied in the soil (radioactivity per unit mass of the stated compound).

Bottom Line: Microbial electroremediating cells (MERCs) consist in a variety of bioelectrochemical devices that aim to overcome electron acceptor limitation and maximize metabolic oxidation with the purpose of enhancing the biodegradation of a pollutant in the environment.The objective of this work was to use MERCs principles for stimulating soil bacteria to achieve the complete biodegradation of the herbicide (14) C-isoproturon (IPU) to (14) CO(2) in soils.The remarkable impact of electrodes on the microbial activity of natural communities suggests a promising future for this emerging environmental technology that we propose to name bioelectroventing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus