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Stimulating soil microorganisms for mineralizing the herbicide isoproturon by means of microbial electroremediating cells.

Rodrigo Quejigo J, Dörfler U, Schroll R, Esteve-Núñez A - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: Microbial electroremediating cells (MERCs) consist in a variety of bioelectrochemical devices that aim to overcome electron acceptor limitation and maximize metabolic oxidation with the purpose of enhancing the biodegradation of a pollutant in the environment.The objective of this work was to use MERCs principles for stimulating soil bacteria to achieve the complete biodegradation of the herbicide (14) C-isoproturon (IPU) to (14) CO(2) in soils.The remarkable impact of electrodes on the microbial activity of natural communities suggests a promising future for this emerging environmental technology that we propose to name bioelectroventing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. Chronoamperometry of pol‐MERCs polarized at 0.6 V (versus Ag/AgCl). Geometrical anode surface was used for calculating the current density. B. Cyclic voltammetry tests (scan rate: 1 mV s−1) carried out at initial experimental time and after 25 days under bioelectrochemical‐assisted soil (pol‐MERCs and sterile pol‐MERCs).
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mbt212351-fig-0002: A. Chronoamperometry of pol‐MERCs polarized at 0.6 V (versus Ag/AgCl). Geometrical anode surface was used for calculating the current density. B. Cyclic voltammetry tests (scan rate: 1 mV s−1) carried out at initial experimental time and after 25 days under bioelectrochemical‐assisted soil (pol‐MERCs and sterile pol‐MERCs).

Mentions: In order to evaluate the electrochemical performance the current production was continuously registered in pol‐MERCs (Fig. 2A). Soil under this treatment showed just 1 day of lag phase, reaching a maximum current density of 35 mA m−2 before entering into steady‐state (ca. 15 mA m−2).


Stimulating soil microorganisms for mineralizing the herbicide isoproturon by means of microbial electroremediating cells.

Rodrigo Quejigo J, Dörfler U, Schroll R, Esteve-Núñez A - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

A. Chronoamperometry of pol‐MERCs polarized at 0.6 V (versus Ag/AgCl). Geometrical anode surface was used for calculating the current density. B. Cyclic voltammetry tests (scan rate: 1 mV s−1) carried out at initial experimental time and after 25 days under bioelectrochemical‐assisted soil (pol‐MERCs and sterile pol‐MERCs).
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835573&req=5

mbt212351-fig-0002: A. Chronoamperometry of pol‐MERCs polarized at 0.6 V (versus Ag/AgCl). Geometrical anode surface was used for calculating the current density. B. Cyclic voltammetry tests (scan rate: 1 mV s−1) carried out at initial experimental time and after 25 days under bioelectrochemical‐assisted soil (pol‐MERCs and sterile pol‐MERCs).
Mentions: In order to evaluate the electrochemical performance the current production was continuously registered in pol‐MERCs (Fig. 2A). Soil under this treatment showed just 1 day of lag phase, reaching a maximum current density of 35 mA m−2 before entering into steady‐state (ca. 15 mA m−2).

Bottom Line: Microbial electroremediating cells (MERCs) consist in a variety of bioelectrochemical devices that aim to overcome electron acceptor limitation and maximize metabolic oxidation with the purpose of enhancing the biodegradation of a pollutant in the environment.The objective of this work was to use MERCs principles for stimulating soil bacteria to achieve the complete biodegradation of the herbicide (14) C-isoproturon (IPU) to (14) CO(2) in soils.The remarkable impact of electrodes on the microbial activity of natural communities suggests a promising future for this emerging environmental technology that we propose to name bioelectroventing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus