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Towards the development of multifunctional molecular indicators combining soil biogeochemical and microbiological variables to predict the ecological integrity of silvicultural practices.

Peck V, Quiza L, Buffet JP, Khdhiri M, Durand AA, Paquette A, Thiffault N, Messier C, Beaulieu N, Guertin C, Constant P - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: Analysis of soil nutrients, abundance of bacteria and gas exchanges unveiled no significant difference among the plots.However, inverting site preparation resulted in higher variations of gas exchanges when compared with trenching, mounding and unlogged natural forest.According to this classification model, simple trenching was the approach that represented the lowest ecological risk potential at the microsite level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531 boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Québec, Canada, H7V 1B7.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the sampling design. Five treatment plots were replicated in three blocks. Soil samples were collected at 10 locations from each plots (illustrated with grey trees). Soil was collected in proximity of the stem, at one of the four cardinal points. Replicated soil samples were pooled to obtain one composite sample per replicated plot. The (native) treatment consisted of non‐harvested, non‐planted natural mixed forest areas located within the experimental blocks.
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mbt212348-fig-0005: Schematic representation of the sampling design. Five treatment plots were replicated in three blocks. Soil samples were collected at 10 locations from each plots (illustrated with grey trees). Soil was collected in proximity of the stem, at one of the four cardinal points. Replicated soil samples were pooled to obtain one composite sample per replicated plot. The (native) treatment consisted of non‐harvested, non‐planted natural mixed forest areas located within the experimental blocks.

Mentions: The study site was located near La Tuque (Québec, Canada; 47° 37′ 19″ N, 72° 49′ 55″ W), about 250 km north of Montréal. The experimental area, dominated by balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), yellow birch (B. alleghaniensis Britt.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) was harvested in 2009 (clear‐cut with 5% retention) prior to the installation of an experiment to investigate the impact of different MSP techniques on the growth performance of hybrid larch planted in April 2010 (Buitrago et al., 2015). The experimental design consisted of a complete block design comprising three replicated blocks (Fig. 5). Briefly, each block was separated into four plots randomly assigned to different MSP treatments encompassing trenching and mounding. Trenching was performed with rotary discs mixing mineral and organic soil horizons. This treatment was applied either as a simple (simple plots; composite samples S‐A, S‐B, S‐C) or double trenching (double intensive plots; composite samples D‐A, D‐B, D‐C) corresponding to an increasing gradient of soil mixing (Buitrago et al., 2015). An excavator was used for the mounding treatments consisting in inverting the soil horizons to place mineral soil on the top and the organic layer at the bottom. Excavated soil was either placed back to the original ditch (inversion plots; composite samples I‐A, I‐B, I‐C) or on soil surface next to the ditch generated by the excavation (mound plots; composite samples M‐A, M‐B, M‐C). Seedlings were planted in the hinge position of the trenching furrows or near the centre of excavated mounds. Finally, plots consisting of non‐harvested, non‐planted natural mixed forest areas (retention areas located within the three experimental blocks, and consisting in approximately 500–600 m2 plots) were used as reference in this study (unlogged natural plots; composite samples N‐A, N‐B, N‐C). These unlogged forest soils were selected as reference plots based on third‐party forest certification criteria (e.g. Forest Stewardship Council), where reference forests in the vicinity of forest management units are used to measure the impact of management plans on ecosystem integrity.


Towards the development of multifunctional molecular indicators combining soil biogeochemical and microbiological variables to predict the ecological integrity of silvicultural practices.

Peck V, Quiza L, Buffet JP, Khdhiri M, Durand AA, Paquette A, Thiffault N, Messier C, Beaulieu N, Guertin C, Constant P - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Schematic representation of the sampling design. Five treatment plots were replicated in three blocks. Soil samples were collected at 10 locations from each plots (illustrated with grey trees). Soil was collected in proximity of the stem, at one of the four cardinal points. Replicated soil samples were pooled to obtain one composite sample per replicated plot. The (native) treatment consisted of non‐harvested, non‐planted natural mixed forest areas located within the experimental blocks.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835570&req=5

mbt212348-fig-0005: Schematic representation of the sampling design. Five treatment plots were replicated in three blocks. Soil samples were collected at 10 locations from each plots (illustrated with grey trees). Soil was collected in proximity of the stem, at one of the four cardinal points. Replicated soil samples were pooled to obtain one composite sample per replicated plot. The (native) treatment consisted of non‐harvested, non‐planted natural mixed forest areas located within the experimental blocks.
Mentions: The study site was located near La Tuque (Québec, Canada; 47° 37′ 19″ N, 72° 49′ 55″ W), about 250 km north of Montréal. The experimental area, dominated by balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), yellow birch (B. alleghaniensis Britt.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) was harvested in 2009 (clear‐cut with 5% retention) prior to the installation of an experiment to investigate the impact of different MSP techniques on the growth performance of hybrid larch planted in April 2010 (Buitrago et al., 2015). The experimental design consisted of a complete block design comprising three replicated blocks (Fig. 5). Briefly, each block was separated into four plots randomly assigned to different MSP treatments encompassing trenching and mounding. Trenching was performed with rotary discs mixing mineral and organic soil horizons. This treatment was applied either as a simple (simple plots; composite samples S‐A, S‐B, S‐C) or double trenching (double intensive plots; composite samples D‐A, D‐B, D‐C) corresponding to an increasing gradient of soil mixing (Buitrago et al., 2015). An excavator was used for the mounding treatments consisting in inverting the soil horizons to place mineral soil on the top and the organic layer at the bottom. Excavated soil was either placed back to the original ditch (inversion plots; composite samples I‐A, I‐B, I‐C) or on soil surface next to the ditch generated by the excavation (mound plots; composite samples M‐A, M‐B, M‐C). Seedlings were planted in the hinge position of the trenching furrows or near the centre of excavated mounds. Finally, plots consisting of non‐harvested, non‐planted natural mixed forest areas (retention areas located within the three experimental blocks, and consisting in approximately 500–600 m2 plots) were used as reference in this study (unlogged natural plots; composite samples N‐A, N‐B, N‐C). These unlogged forest soils were selected as reference plots based on third‐party forest certification criteria (e.g. Forest Stewardship Council), where reference forests in the vicinity of forest management units are used to measure the impact of management plans on ecosystem integrity.

Bottom Line: Analysis of soil nutrients, abundance of bacteria and gas exchanges unveiled no significant difference among the plots.However, inverting site preparation resulted in higher variations of gas exchanges when compared with trenching, mounding and unlogged natural forest.According to this classification model, simple trenching was the approach that represented the lowest ecological risk potential at the microsite level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 531 boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Québec, Canada, H7V 1B7.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus