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Dihydroxynaphthalene-based mimicry of fungal melanogenesis for multifunctional coatings.

Jeon JR, Le TT, Chang YS - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: This product, termed poly(2,7-DHN), was successfully deposited onto a wide variety of solid surfaces, including metals, polymeric materials, ceramics, biosurfaces and mineral complexes.The melanin-like polymerization could be used to co-immobilize other organic molecules, forming functional surfaces.Moreover, the novel physicochemical properties of the poly(2,7-DHN) illuminate its potential applications as bactericidal, radical-scavenging and pollutant-sorbing agents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Agriculture & Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 52727, Korea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. Water contact angle of PET film before (left) and after (right) bovine serum albumin (BSA) post‐immobilization. XPS spectra of the film B. before and C. after BSA post‐immobilization.D. Water contact angle of PET film coated with 2,7‐DHN with a precursor, 2‐dimethylaminoethanethiol for co‐immobilization and further silicification. Left to right: before silicification; after silicification. Si peaks revealed by XPS analysis E. before silicification or F. after silicification.G. Photograph of electroless silver metallization of 2,7‐DHN‐coated PET film. Top to down: Before and after metallization. Silver (Ag 3d) XPS peaks of PET film H. before and I. after the metallization.
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mbt212347-fig-0004: A. Water contact angle of PET film before (left) and after (right) bovine serum albumin (BSA) post‐immobilization. XPS spectra of the film B. before and C. after BSA post‐immobilization.D. Water contact angle of PET film coated with 2,7‐DHN with a precursor, 2‐dimethylaminoethanethiol for co‐immobilization and further silicification. Left to right: before silicification; after silicification. Si peaks revealed by XPS analysis E. before silicification or F. after silicification.G. Photograph of electroless silver metallization of 2,7‐DHN‐coated PET film. Top to down: Before and after metallization. Silver (Ag 3d) XPS peaks of PET film H. before and I. after the metallization.

Mentions: In the present study, the observation of hydroxyphenyl groups in poly(2,7‐DHN) strongly indicates the feasibility of post‐modification of a layer made of this polymer. To test this suggestion, we used bovine serum albumin (BSA), which is known to enhance the compatibility of blood with various surfaces (Wei et al., 2010). By applying a simple dipping method, proteins could be attached to the polyphenolic groups of poly(2‐7‐DHN). This procedure resulted in an effective modification of the surface, which was verified by the observed change in the water contact angle (Fig. 4A, Table S4). X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided further evidence for the successful modification, with a clear nitrogen peak due to the conjugated protein present in the spectrum of the modified surface (Fig. 4B and C). In the case of dopamine‐based coatings, a Schiff base between lysine groups of BSA and catechol groups of polydopamine (i.e., chemisorption) is readily formed through quinone formation from the catechol (Wei et al., 2010; Lynge et al., 2011). However, 2,7‐DHN does not form the corresponding quinone groups theoretically, thus excluding the possibility of chemisorption between BSA and poly(2,7‐DHN). In our conditions, the polyphenolic groups on poly(2,7‐DHN) layers might capture BSA proteins physically. It is noticeable that physical interactions between polyphenols and proteins have been frequently reported (Xiao and Kai, 2012).


Dihydroxynaphthalene-based mimicry of fungal melanogenesis for multifunctional coatings.

Jeon JR, Le TT, Chang YS - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

A. Water contact angle of PET film before (left) and after (right) bovine serum albumin (BSA) post‐immobilization. XPS spectra of the film B. before and C. after BSA post‐immobilization.D. Water contact angle of PET film coated with 2,7‐DHN with a precursor, 2‐dimethylaminoethanethiol for co‐immobilization and further silicification. Left to right: before silicification; after silicification. Si peaks revealed by XPS analysis E. before silicification or F. after silicification.G. Photograph of electroless silver metallization of 2,7‐DHN‐coated PET film. Top to down: Before and after metallization. Silver (Ag 3d) XPS peaks of PET film H. before and I. after the metallization.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835569&req=5

mbt212347-fig-0004: A. Water contact angle of PET film before (left) and after (right) bovine serum albumin (BSA) post‐immobilization. XPS spectra of the film B. before and C. after BSA post‐immobilization.D. Water contact angle of PET film coated with 2,7‐DHN with a precursor, 2‐dimethylaminoethanethiol for co‐immobilization and further silicification. Left to right: before silicification; after silicification. Si peaks revealed by XPS analysis E. before silicification or F. after silicification.G. Photograph of electroless silver metallization of 2,7‐DHN‐coated PET film. Top to down: Before and after metallization. Silver (Ag 3d) XPS peaks of PET film H. before and I. after the metallization.
Mentions: In the present study, the observation of hydroxyphenyl groups in poly(2,7‐DHN) strongly indicates the feasibility of post‐modification of a layer made of this polymer. To test this suggestion, we used bovine serum albumin (BSA), which is known to enhance the compatibility of blood with various surfaces (Wei et al., 2010). By applying a simple dipping method, proteins could be attached to the polyphenolic groups of poly(2‐7‐DHN). This procedure resulted in an effective modification of the surface, which was verified by the observed change in the water contact angle (Fig. 4A, Table S4). X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided further evidence for the successful modification, with a clear nitrogen peak due to the conjugated protein present in the spectrum of the modified surface (Fig. 4B and C). In the case of dopamine‐based coatings, a Schiff base between lysine groups of BSA and catechol groups of polydopamine (i.e., chemisorption) is readily formed through quinone formation from the catechol (Wei et al., 2010; Lynge et al., 2011). However, 2,7‐DHN does not form the corresponding quinone groups theoretically, thus excluding the possibility of chemisorption between BSA and poly(2,7‐DHN). In our conditions, the polyphenolic groups on poly(2,7‐DHN) layers might capture BSA proteins physically. It is noticeable that physical interactions between polyphenols and proteins have been frequently reported (Xiao and Kai, 2012).

Bottom Line: This product, termed poly(2,7-DHN), was successfully deposited onto a wide variety of solid surfaces, including metals, polymeric materials, ceramics, biosurfaces and mineral complexes.The melanin-like polymerization could be used to co-immobilize other organic molecules, forming functional surfaces.Moreover, the novel physicochemical properties of the poly(2,7-DHN) illuminate its potential applications as bactericidal, radical-scavenging and pollutant-sorbing agents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Agriculture & Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 52727, Korea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus