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Use of mulberry-soybean intercropping in salt-alkali soil impacts the diversity of the soil bacterial community.

Li X, Sun M, Zhang H, Xu N, Sun G - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Bottom Line: Most of Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were found in intercropping samples, while Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria were present at a higher percentage in monoculture samples.The plant diversity of aboveground and microbial diversity of belowground was linked and soil pH seemed to influence the bacterial community.Finally, the specific plant species was the major factor that determined the bacterial community in the salt-alkali soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, 150040, China.

No MeSH data available.


Rarefaction curves indicating the observed number of OTUs at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10% in all soil samples. MM, mulberry monoculture; IM, intercropping mulberry; SM, soybean monoculture; IS, intercropping soybean.
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mbt212342-fig-0001: Rarefaction curves indicating the observed number of OTUs at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10% in all soil samples. MM, mulberry monoculture; IM, intercropping mulberry; SM, soybean monoculture; IS, intercropping soybean.

Mentions: To determine rarefaction curves and other measures of diversity, OTUs were identified at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10%. Rarefaction curves indicated consistent differences in all four samples (Fig. 1). At 10% genetic distances, almost all rarefaction curves reached saturation, indicating that the surveying effort covered almost the full extent of taxonomic diversity at this genetic distance. At 3% and 5% genetic distances, rarefaction curves suggested that the sequencing effort was not large enough to capture the complete diversity of these communities, as the curves did not level off with increasing sample size. The comparison of mean Chao 1 richness estimates of mulberry rhizosphere soils and with soybean rhizosphere soils showed different values at genetic distances of 3% (6609 OTUs and 8296 OTUs respectively), 5% (4980 OTUs and 6083 OTUs respectively) and 10% (2552 OTUs and 2990 OTUs respectively), and the richness was higher in soybean rhizosphere soils (P < 0.05) (Table 1). Analysis of differences of ways of planting by employing Student's t‐test at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10% showed that the intercropping patterns did not vary significantly in the predicted number of OTUs (P > 0.05). The same conclusion was seen using the Ace richness index (Table 1). Moreover, comparison of the mean Shannon diversity index of all samples revealed that the highest bacterial diversity at all analysed genetic distances was found in SM, followed by IS, IM and MM. The predicted richness and diversity in the soybean monoculture rhizosphere soils exceeded that of the corresponding mulberry monoculture soils. Thus, an influence of plant species on bacterial richness and diversity was observed. Intercropping impacted overall bacterial diversity.


Use of mulberry-soybean intercropping in salt-alkali soil impacts the diversity of the soil bacterial community.

Li X, Sun M, Zhang H, Xu N, Sun G - Microb Biotechnol (2016)

Rarefaction curves indicating the observed number of OTUs at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10% in all soil samples. MM, mulberry monoculture; IM, intercropping mulberry; SM, soybean monoculture; IS, intercropping soybean.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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mbt212342-fig-0001: Rarefaction curves indicating the observed number of OTUs at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10% in all soil samples. MM, mulberry monoculture; IM, intercropping mulberry; SM, soybean monoculture; IS, intercropping soybean.
Mentions: To determine rarefaction curves and other measures of diversity, OTUs were identified at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10%. Rarefaction curves indicated consistent differences in all four samples (Fig. 1). At 10% genetic distances, almost all rarefaction curves reached saturation, indicating that the surveying effort covered almost the full extent of taxonomic diversity at this genetic distance. At 3% and 5% genetic distances, rarefaction curves suggested that the sequencing effort was not large enough to capture the complete diversity of these communities, as the curves did not level off with increasing sample size. The comparison of mean Chao 1 richness estimates of mulberry rhizosphere soils and with soybean rhizosphere soils showed different values at genetic distances of 3% (6609 OTUs and 8296 OTUs respectively), 5% (4980 OTUs and 6083 OTUs respectively) and 10% (2552 OTUs and 2990 OTUs respectively), and the richness was higher in soybean rhizosphere soils (P < 0.05) (Table 1). Analysis of differences of ways of planting by employing Student's t‐test at genetic distances of 3%, 5% and 10% showed that the intercropping patterns did not vary significantly in the predicted number of OTUs (P > 0.05). The same conclusion was seen using the Ace richness index (Table 1). Moreover, comparison of the mean Shannon diversity index of all samples revealed that the highest bacterial diversity at all analysed genetic distances was found in SM, followed by IS, IM and MM. The predicted richness and diversity in the soybean monoculture rhizosphere soils exceeded that of the corresponding mulberry monoculture soils. Thus, an influence of plant species on bacterial richness and diversity was observed. Intercropping impacted overall bacterial diversity.

Bottom Line: Most of Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were found in intercropping samples, while Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria were present at a higher percentage in monoculture samples.The plant diversity of aboveground and microbial diversity of belowground was linked and soil pH seemed to influence the bacterial community.Finally, the specific plant species was the major factor that determined the bacterial community in the salt-alkali soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, 150040, China.

No MeSH data available.