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Endocrine dysfunctions in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

Kim YM, Cho JH, Kang E, Kim GH, Seo EJ, Lee BH, Choi JH, Yoo HW - Ann Pediatr Endocrinol Metab (2016)

Bottom Line: Endocrine dysfunctions are not uncommon causes of morbidity in patients with WBS.The severity and outcomes of their endocrine manifestations were heterogeneous.Long-term follow-up is needed to predict the prognosis of endocrine features.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is caused by a hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7q11.23 and is characterized by global cognitive impairment, dysmorphic facial features, and supravalvular aortic stenosis. Endocrine dysfunctions have been reported in patients with WBS. This study was performed to investigate the frequency, clinical features, and outcomes of endocrine dysfunctions in children with WBS.

Methods: One hundred two patients were included. The diagnosis was confirmed by chromosome analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Medical charts were reviewed retrospectively to analyze endocrine dysfunctions such as short stature, precocious puberty, thyroid dysfunctions, and hypocalcemia.

Results: The age at diagnosis was 3.7±4.4 years (one month to 19 years). Height- and weight-standard deviation score (SDS) were -1.1±1.1 and -1.4±1.4 at presentation, respectively. Short stature was found in 26 patients (28.3%) among those older than 2 years. Body mass index-SDS increased as the patients grew older (P<0.001). Two males and one female (2.9%) were diagnosed with central precocious puberty. Nine patients (8.8%) were diagnosed with primary hypothyroidism at age 4.0±4.3 years (one month to 12.1 years); their serum thyroid stimulating hormone and free T4 levels were 15.2±5.4 µU/mL and 1.2±0.2 ng/dL, respectively. Hypercalcemia was observed in 12 out of 55 patients under age 3 (22%) at the age of 14.3±6.6 months (7 to 28 months) with a mean serum calcium level of 13.1±2.1 mg/dL.

Conclusion: Endocrine dysfunctions are not uncommon causes of morbidity in patients with WBS. The severity and outcomes of their endocrine manifestations were heterogeneous. Long-term follow-up is needed to predict the prognosis of endocrine features.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluorescent in situ hybridization showing deletion of the ELN gene at chromosome 7q11.23.
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Figure 1: Fluorescent in situ hybridization showing deletion of the ELN gene at chromosome 7q11.23.

Mentions: This study included 102 consecutive patients (64 males [62.7%] and 38 females [37.3%]) with WBS diagnosed between May 1993 and July 2015 in Asan Medical Center. The most common presenting sign was developmental delay (47.6%), followed by cardiac anomaly such as supravalvular aortic stenosis and mitral valve prolapse (31.1%), facial dysmorphism (5.8%), and failure to thrive (1.9%). FISH was performed in patients with clinical features of WBS such as typical facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, cardiac anomaly, and hypercalcemia. Deletion of the 7q11.23 region was identified by FISH in 102 patients (Fig. 1).


Endocrine dysfunctions in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

Kim YM, Cho JH, Kang E, Kim GH, Seo EJ, Lee BH, Choi JH, Yoo HW - Ann Pediatr Endocrinol Metab (2016)

Fluorescent in situ hybridization showing deletion of the ELN gene at chromosome 7q11.23.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835556&req=5

Figure 1: Fluorescent in situ hybridization showing deletion of the ELN gene at chromosome 7q11.23.
Mentions: This study included 102 consecutive patients (64 males [62.7%] and 38 females [37.3%]) with WBS diagnosed between May 1993 and July 2015 in Asan Medical Center. The most common presenting sign was developmental delay (47.6%), followed by cardiac anomaly such as supravalvular aortic stenosis and mitral valve prolapse (31.1%), facial dysmorphism (5.8%), and failure to thrive (1.9%). FISH was performed in patients with clinical features of WBS such as typical facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, cardiac anomaly, and hypercalcemia. Deletion of the 7q11.23 region was identified by FISH in 102 patients (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Endocrine dysfunctions are not uncommon causes of morbidity in patients with WBS.The severity and outcomes of their endocrine manifestations were heterogeneous.Long-term follow-up is needed to predict the prognosis of endocrine features.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is caused by a hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7q11.23 and is characterized by global cognitive impairment, dysmorphic facial features, and supravalvular aortic stenosis. Endocrine dysfunctions have been reported in patients with WBS. This study was performed to investigate the frequency, clinical features, and outcomes of endocrine dysfunctions in children with WBS.

Methods: One hundred two patients were included. The diagnosis was confirmed by chromosome analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Medical charts were reviewed retrospectively to analyze endocrine dysfunctions such as short stature, precocious puberty, thyroid dysfunctions, and hypocalcemia.

Results: The age at diagnosis was 3.7±4.4 years (one month to 19 years). Height- and weight-standard deviation score (SDS) were -1.1±1.1 and -1.4±1.4 at presentation, respectively. Short stature was found in 26 patients (28.3%) among those older than 2 years. Body mass index-SDS increased as the patients grew older (P<0.001). Two males and one female (2.9%) were diagnosed with central precocious puberty. Nine patients (8.8%) were diagnosed with primary hypothyroidism at age 4.0±4.3 years (one month to 12.1 years); their serum thyroid stimulating hormone and free T4 levels were 15.2±5.4 µU/mL and 1.2±0.2 ng/dL, respectively. Hypercalcemia was observed in 12 out of 55 patients under age 3 (22%) at the age of 14.3±6.6 months (7 to 28 months) with a mean serum calcium level of 13.1±2.1 mg/dL.

Conclusion: Endocrine dysfunctions are not uncommon causes of morbidity in patients with WBS. The severity and outcomes of their endocrine manifestations were heterogeneous. Long-term follow-up is needed to predict the prognosis of endocrine features.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus