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Mesolimbic Dopamine Encodes Prediction Errors in a State-Dependent Manner.

Papageorgiou GK, Baudonnat M, Cucca F, Walton ME - Cell Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Mesolimbic dopamine encodes the benefits of a course of action.These changes were rapid and selective, with dopamine release returning to pre-satiation patterns when the animals were re-tested in a standard food-restricted state.Such rapid and selective adaptation of dopamine-associated value signals could provide an important signal to promote efficient foraging for a varied diet.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 9 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD, UK. Electronic address: georgios.papageorgiou@psy.ox.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dynamic Changes in Cue-Evoked Dopamine after Selective Satiation(A–D) Average cue-evoked dopamine (DA) signals (A and B) or effect sizes from a general linear model (C and D) after selective satiation on sucrose solution (Suc) (A and C) or food (B and D).(E) Change in preference and relative cue-evoked dopamine plotted over five bins each of two blocks of trials following sucrose solution or food devaluation. Choice is expressed as a change from 50% [(2 × proportion of food choices) − 1]. Relative cue-evoked dopamine is the difference between average food cue and sucrose solution cue dopamine levels during the 5-s post-cue period. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(F) Comparison between average cue-evoked dopamine release during the baseline and devaluation sessions on food (left) or sucrose solution trials (right). Data are divided up into “valued” and “devalued” based on which reinforcer the rats had free access to before the devaluation session. Baseline data are from the immediately preceding baseline session.(G) Average dopamine in the 5-s post-cue period in the devaluation sessions, divided up into five bins each of two blocks of trials. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(H) Dopamine discrimination index for each animal in the 5 s post cue period for both valued food versus devalued sucrose solution (red triangles) and for valued sucrose solution versus devalued food (blue triangles), plotted against each animal’s choices of the valued reinforcer in that session. There was no reliable relationship between these measures (r = 0.183, p = 0.51).Lines: ∗p < 0.05 permutation tests, corrected for multiple comparisons. All averages indicate mean ± SEM.
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fig3: Dynamic Changes in Cue-Evoked Dopamine after Selective Satiation(A–D) Average cue-evoked dopamine (DA) signals (A and B) or effect sizes from a general linear model (C and D) after selective satiation on sucrose solution (Suc) (A and C) or food (B and D).(E) Change in preference and relative cue-evoked dopamine plotted over five bins each of two blocks of trials following sucrose solution or food devaluation. Choice is expressed as a change from 50% [(2 × proportion of food choices) − 1]. Relative cue-evoked dopamine is the difference between average food cue and sucrose solution cue dopamine levels during the 5-s post-cue period. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(F) Comparison between average cue-evoked dopamine release during the baseline and devaluation sessions on food (left) or sucrose solution trials (right). Data are divided up into “valued” and “devalued” based on which reinforcer the rats had free access to before the devaluation session. Baseline data are from the immediately preceding baseline session.(G) Average dopamine in the 5-s post-cue period in the devaluation sessions, divided up into five bins each of two blocks of trials. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(H) Dopamine discrimination index for each animal in the 5 s post cue period for both valued food versus devalued sucrose solution (red triangles) and for valued sucrose solution versus devalued food (blue triangles), plotted against each animal’s choices of the valued reinforcer in that session. There was no reliable relationship between these measures (r = 0.183, p = 0.51).Lines: ∗p < 0.05 permutation tests, corrected for multiple comparisons. All averages indicate mean ± SEM.

Mentions: As can be observed in Figure 3, this is exactly what we found. While food cues elicited significantly greater dopamine release than sucrose solution cues in the sucrose solution devaluation session (Figure 3A), this reversed after food devaluation, with dopamine release for food cues now lower than after sucrose solution cues (Figure 3B). This was borne out by a linear regression that showed a significant effect of reward type on cue-evoked dopamine in both sessions, but with the sign modulated by the identity of the pre-fed reinforcer (Figures 3C and 3D). To further investigate this change in cue-elicited release, dopamine levels either on forced food or forced sucrose solution trials were analyzed across five equally sized blocks in the session. This showed that these effects occurred rapidly, being evident within the first block of the session (analysis of valued or devalued cue dopamine: F(1, 6) = 11.93, p = 0.014; no main effect or interaction with reward type: both Fs < 1.39, p > 0.28; n = 7, as one animal was excluded for having ≤5% responses on the devalued option) (Figure 3E).


Mesolimbic Dopamine Encodes Prediction Errors in a State-Dependent Manner.

Papageorgiou GK, Baudonnat M, Cucca F, Walton ME - Cell Rep (2016)

Dynamic Changes in Cue-Evoked Dopamine after Selective Satiation(A–D) Average cue-evoked dopamine (DA) signals (A and B) or effect sizes from a general linear model (C and D) after selective satiation on sucrose solution (Suc) (A and C) or food (B and D).(E) Change in preference and relative cue-evoked dopamine plotted over five bins each of two blocks of trials following sucrose solution or food devaluation. Choice is expressed as a change from 50% [(2 × proportion of food choices) − 1]. Relative cue-evoked dopamine is the difference between average food cue and sucrose solution cue dopamine levels during the 5-s post-cue period. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(F) Comparison between average cue-evoked dopamine release during the baseline and devaluation sessions on food (left) or sucrose solution trials (right). Data are divided up into “valued” and “devalued” based on which reinforcer the rats had free access to before the devaluation session. Baseline data are from the immediately preceding baseline session.(G) Average dopamine in the 5-s post-cue period in the devaluation sessions, divided up into five bins each of two blocks of trials. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(H) Dopamine discrimination index for each animal in the 5 s post cue period for both valued food versus devalued sucrose solution (red triangles) and for valued sucrose solution versus devalued food (blue triangles), plotted against each animal’s choices of the valued reinforcer in that session. There was no reliable relationship between these measures (r = 0.183, p = 0.51).Lines: ∗p < 0.05 permutation tests, corrected for multiple comparisons. All averages indicate mean ± SEM.
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fig3: Dynamic Changes in Cue-Evoked Dopamine after Selective Satiation(A–D) Average cue-evoked dopamine (DA) signals (A and B) or effect sizes from a general linear model (C and D) after selective satiation on sucrose solution (Suc) (A and C) or food (B and D).(E) Change in preference and relative cue-evoked dopamine plotted over five bins each of two blocks of trials following sucrose solution or food devaluation. Choice is expressed as a change from 50% [(2 × proportion of food choices) − 1]. Relative cue-evoked dopamine is the difference between average food cue and sucrose solution cue dopamine levels during the 5-s post-cue period. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(F) Comparison between average cue-evoked dopamine release during the baseline and devaluation sessions on food (left) or sucrose solution trials (right). Data are divided up into “valued” and “devalued” based on which reinforcer the rats had free access to before the devaluation session. Baseline data are from the immediately preceding baseline session.(G) Average dopamine in the 5-s post-cue period in the devaluation sessions, divided up into five bins each of two blocks of trials. The average difference across the whole of the immediately preceding baseline session is presented for comparison.(H) Dopamine discrimination index for each animal in the 5 s post cue period for both valued food versus devalued sucrose solution (red triangles) and for valued sucrose solution versus devalued food (blue triangles), plotted against each animal’s choices of the valued reinforcer in that session. There was no reliable relationship between these measures (r = 0.183, p = 0.51).Lines: ∗p < 0.05 permutation tests, corrected for multiple comparisons. All averages indicate mean ± SEM.
Mentions: As can be observed in Figure 3, this is exactly what we found. While food cues elicited significantly greater dopamine release than sucrose solution cues in the sucrose solution devaluation session (Figure 3A), this reversed after food devaluation, with dopamine release for food cues now lower than after sucrose solution cues (Figure 3B). This was borne out by a linear regression that showed a significant effect of reward type on cue-evoked dopamine in both sessions, but with the sign modulated by the identity of the pre-fed reinforcer (Figures 3C and 3D). To further investigate this change in cue-elicited release, dopamine levels either on forced food or forced sucrose solution trials were analyzed across five equally sized blocks in the session. This showed that these effects occurred rapidly, being evident within the first block of the session (analysis of valued or devalued cue dopamine: F(1, 6) = 11.93, p = 0.014; no main effect or interaction with reward type: both Fs < 1.39, p > 0.28; n = 7, as one animal was excluded for having ≤5% responses on the devalued option) (Figure 3E).

Bottom Line: Mesolimbic dopamine encodes the benefits of a course of action.These changes were rapid and selective, with dopamine release returning to pre-satiation patterns when the animals were re-tested in a standard food-restricted state.Such rapid and selective adaptation of dopamine-associated value signals could provide an important signal to promote efficient foraging for a varied diet.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, 9 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD, UK. Electronic address: georgios.papageorgiou@psy.ox.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus