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Plasmonic piezoelectric nanomechanical resonator for spectrally selective infrared sensing.

Hui Y, Gomez-Diaz JS, Qian Z, Alù A, Rinaldi M - Nat Commun (2016)

Bottom Line: We experimentally demonstrate that it is possible to achieve high thermomechanical coupling between electromagnetic and mechanical resonances in a single ultrathin piezoelectric nanoplate.The combination of nanoplasmonic and piezoelectric resonances allows the proposed device to selectively detect long-wavelength infrared radiation with unprecedented electromechanical performance and thermal capabilities.These attributes lead to the demonstration of a fast, high-resolution, uncooled infrared detector with ∼80% absorption for an optimized spectral bandwidth centered around 8.8 μm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical &Computer Engineering at Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Ultrathin plasmonic metasurfaces have proven their ability to control and manipulate light at unprecedented levels, leading to exciting optical functionalities and applications. Although to date metasurfaces have mainly been investigated from an electromagnetic perspective, their ultrathin nature may also provide novel and useful mechanical properties. Here we propose a thin piezoelectric plasmonic metasurface forming the resonant body of a nanomechanical resonator with simultaneously tailored optical and electromechanical properties. We experimentally demonstrate that it is possible to achieve high thermomechanical coupling between electromagnetic and mechanical resonances in a single ultrathin piezoelectric nanoplate. The combination of nanoplasmonic and piezoelectric resonances allows the proposed device to selectively detect long-wavelength infrared radiation with unprecedented electromechanical performance and thermal capabilities. These attributes lead to the demonstration of a fast, high-resolution, uncooled infrared detector with ∼80% absorption for an optimized spectral bandwidth centered around 8.8 μm.

No MeSH data available.


Electrothermal equivalent circuit of the device.(a) Equivalent thermoelectrical circuit of the nanoplasmonic piezoelectric NEMS resonator. (b) Modified Butterworth–Van Dyke (MBVD) equivalent circuit.
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f5: Electrothermal equivalent circuit of the device.(a) Equivalent thermoelectrical circuit of the nanoplasmonic piezoelectric NEMS resonator. (b) Modified Butterworth–Van Dyke (MBVD) equivalent circuit.

Mentions: The proposed plasmonic piezoelectric NEMS resonant infrared detector is modelled by a two-port network with both electrical (voltage, V, used to drive the electromechanical resonance) and thermal inputs (infrared power, QIR, absorbed in the piezoelectric resonant structure), as shown in Fig. 5a. At the thermal port, the free-standing resonant structure is simply modelled as a thermal mass, with thermal capacitance Cth, coupled with the heat sink at a constant temperature T0 via the thermal conductance Gth (thermal resistance, Rth=1/Gth). The thermal capacitance is intrinsically related to the properties and overall volume of the material stack forming the vibrating structure (Cth=c·v·ρ; where c is the specific heat capacity, v is the volume and ρ is the material density). The thermal conductance is instead mainly determined by the geometry and material properties of the tethers connecting the free-standing vibrating body of the device to the substrate (Supplementary Note 2). At the electrical port, the resonator is modelled with a modified Butterworth–Van Dyke (MBVD) equivalent circuit model43, shown in Figure 5b. The MBVD circuit consists of two branches in parallel: an acoustic branch composed by the series combination of the motional resistance, Rm (quantifying dissipative losses), motional capacitance, Cm (inversely proportional to the stiffness) and motional inductance, Lm (proportional to the mass); and an electrical branch composed by the series combination of the capacitance, C0 (capacitance between the device terminals), and resistance, R0 (representing the dielectric loss). A series resistance, Rs, is also included in the circuit to represent the electrical loss associated with the metal electrodes and routing (Fig. 5b).


Plasmonic piezoelectric nanomechanical resonator for spectrally selective infrared sensing.

Hui Y, Gomez-Diaz JS, Qian Z, Alù A, Rinaldi M - Nat Commun (2016)

Electrothermal equivalent circuit of the device.(a) Equivalent thermoelectrical circuit of the nanoplasmonic piezoelectric NEMS resonator. (b) Modified Butterworth–Van Dyke (MBVD) equivalent circuit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835539&req=5

f5: Electrothermal equivalent circuit of the device.(a) Equivalent thermoelectrical circuit of the nanoplasmonic piezoelectric NEMS resonator. (b) Modified Butterworth–Van Dyke (MBVD) equivalent circuit.
Mentions: The proposed plasmonic piezoelectric NEMS resonant infrared detector is modelled by a two-port network with both electrical (voltage, V, used to drive the electromechanical resonance) and thermal inputs (infrared power, QIR, absorbed in the piezoelectric resonant structure), as shown in Fig. 5a. At the thermal port, the free-standing resonant structure is simply modelled as a thermal mass, with thermal capacitance Cth, coupled with the heat sink at a constant temperature T0 via the thermal conductance Gth (thermal resistance, Rth=1/Gth). The thermal capacitance is intrinsically related to the properties and overall volume of the material stack forming the vibrating structure (Cth=c·v·ρ; where c is the specific heat capacity, v is the volume and ρ is the material density). The thermal conductance is instead mainly determined by the geometry and material properties of the tethers connecting the free-standing vibrating body of the device to the substrate (Supplementary Note 2). At the electrical port, the resonator is modelled with a modified Butterworth–Van Dyke (MBVD) equivalent circuit model43, shown in Figure 5b. The MBVD circuit consists of two branches in parallel: an acoustic branch composed by the series combination of the motional resistance, Rm (quantifying dissipative losses), motional capacitance, Cm (inversely proportional to the stiffness) and motional inductance, Lm (proportional to the mass); and an electrical branch composed by the series combination of the capacitance, C0 (capacitance between the device terminals), and resistance, R0 (representing the dielectric loss). A series resistance, Rs, is also included in the circuit to represent the electrical loss associated with the metal electrodes and routing (Fig. 5b).

Bottom Line: We experimentally demonstrate that it is possible to achieve high thermomechanical coupling between electromagnetic and mechanical resonances in a single ultrathin piezoelectric nanoplate.The combination of nanoplasmonic and piezoelectric resonances allows the proposed device to selectively detect long-wavelength infrared radiation with unprecedented electromechanical performance and thermal capabilities.These attributes lead to the demonstration of a fast, high-resolution, uncooled infrared detector with ∼80% absorption for an optimized spectral bandwidth centered around 8.8 μm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical &Computer Engineering at Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Ultrathin plasmonic metasurfaces have proven their ability to control and manipulate light at unprecedented levels, leading to exciting optical functionalities and applications. Although to date metasurfaces have mainly been investigated from an electromagnetic perspective, their ultrathin nature may also provide novel and useful mechanical properties. Here we propose a thin piezoelectric plasmonic metasurface forming the resonant body of a nanomechanical resonator with simultaneously tailored optical and electromechanical properties. We experimentally demonstrate that it is possible to achieve high thermomechanical coupling between electromagnetic and mechanical resonances in a single ultrathin piezoelectric nanoplate. The combination of nanoplasmonic and piezoelectric resonances allows the proposed device to selectively detect long-wavelength infrared radiation with unprecedented electromechanical performance and thermal capabilities. These attributes lead to the demonstration of a fast, high-resolution, uncooled infrared detector with ∼80% absorption for an optimized spectral bandwidth centered around 8.8 μm.

No MeSH data available.