Limits...
First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Daily maximum temperatures at four field locations during the growing period
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Fig7: Daily maximum temperatures at four field locations during the growing period

Mentions: In our experiments, the maximum daily temperatures were constantly higher at the locations with heat conditions (Monselice and Zsombó) compared to the locations with standard conditions (Einbeck and Greven), except for a heat wave in Germany in late July (Table 7). One week before until one week after the mean flowering time, temperatures exceeded 35 C, a total of 76 and 34 h at the locations with heat conditions, Monselice and Zsombó, respectively, whereas the temperature did not exceed 35 C at the locations with standard conditions, Einbeck and Greven (Table 1). Temperatures of 35 C during the reproductive stage of maize were stated to produce heat-related yield reduction (Hasanuzzaman et al. 2013). Maximum daily temperatures of 35 C and above during reproductive development of maize were associated with heat conditions (Cairns et al. 2013). In our experiments, during 15 days around flowering, we observed 0 days of maximum temperatures above 35 C at the locations with standard conditions and a total of 14 and 7 days of maximum temperatures above 35 C at the locations with heat conditions, Monselice and Zsombó, respectively. Thus, strong heat stress was present at the two locations in southern Europe in comparison to the locations in Germany and heat tolerance was successfully assessed in the year when the experiments were conducted. Besides heat stress, there might be further factors, which differed between the locations with standard conditions and the locations with heat conditions that we did not include in our analysis. We, thus, did not measure only heat tolerance but heat tolerance confounded with other factors. However, to our knowledge, the difference in temperature between the standard and the heat location were the most striking factors between them (cf. Fig. 7).Fig. 7


First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Daily maximum temperatures at four field locations during the growing period
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835532&req=5

Fig7: Daily maximum temperatures at four field locations during the growing period
Mentions: In our experiments, the maximum daily temperatures were constantly higher at the locations with heat conditions (Monselice and Zsombó) compared to the locations with standard conditions (Einbeck and Greven), except for a heat wave in Germany in late July (Table 7). One week before until one week after the mean flowering time, temperatures exceeded 35 C, a total of 76 and 34 h at the locations with heat conditions, Monselice and Zsombó, respectively, whereas the temperature did not exceed 35 C at the locations with standard conditions, Einbeck and Greven (Table 1). Temperatures of 35 C during the reproductive stage of maize were stated to produce heat-related yield reduction (Hasanuzzaman et al. 2013). Maximum daily temperatures of 35 C and above during reproductive development of maize were associated with heat conditions (Cairns et al. 2013). In our experiments, during 15 days around flowering, we observed 0 days of maximum temperatures above 35 C at the locations with standard conditions and a total of 14 and 7 days of maximum temperatures above 35 C at the locations with heat conditions, Monselice and Zsombó, respectively. Thus, strong heat stress was present at the two locations in southern Europe in comparison to the locations in Germany and heat tolerance was successfully assessed in the year when the experiments were conducted. Besides heat stress, there might be further factors, which differed between the locations with standard conditions and the locations with heat conditions that we did not include in our analysis. We, thus, did not measure only heat tolerance but heat tolerance confounded with other factors. However, to our knowledge, the difference in temperature between the standard and the heat location were the most striking factors between them (cf. Fig. 7).Fig. 7

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus