Limits...
First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consensus genetic linkage map with the positions of the molecular markers in cM
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Fig5: Consensus genetic linkage map with the positions of the molecular markers in cM

Mentions: The consensus genetic linkage map (Fig. 5) had a total length of 1 823.5 centiMorgan (cM). The average distance was 11.3 cM and the maximum distance 83.2 cM between two markers, where markers were condensed at the centromeres of the chromosomes. Of the total of 161 markers, 21 were situated on chromosome 1, 19 on chromosome 2, 18 on chromosome 3, 19 on chromosome 4, 18 on chromosome 5, 13 on chromosome 6, 15 on chromosome 7, 14 on chromosome 8, 12 on chromosome 9 and 12 on chromosome 10.Table 4


First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Consensus genetic linkage map with the positions of the molecular markers in cM
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835532&req=5

Fig5: Consensus genetic linkage map with the positions of the molecular markers in cM
Mentions: The consensus genetic linkage map (Fig. 5) had a total length of 1 823.5 centiMorgan (cM). The average distance was 11.3 cM and the maximum distance 83.2 cM between two markers, where markers were condensed at the centromeres of the chromosomes. Of the total of 161 markers, 21 were situated on chromosome 1, 19 on chromosome 2, 18 on chromosome 3, 19 on chromosome 4, 18 on chromosome 5, 13 on chromosome 6, 15 on chromosome 7, 14 on chromosome 8, 12 on chromosome 9 and 12 on chromosome 10.Table 4

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus