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First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stability analysis of the adjusted entry means (AEM) relative to that of Einbeck of a dry yield (DY) and b the leaf scorching (LS) for the parental inbred lines over the AEM of four locations across all genotypes for calculation of the heat susceptibility index (HSI)
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Fig3: Stability analysis of the adjusted entry means (AEM) relative to that of Einbeck of a dry yield (DY) and b the leaf scorching (LS) for the parental inbred lines over the AEM of four locations across all genotypes for calculation of the heat susceptibility index (HSI)

Mentions: The first two PCs of the PCA (Fig. 2) explained 41 and 21 % of the total variance of all five HSI (linear regression to calculate HSIDY and HSILS of the parental inbreds, cf. Fig. 3). PC1 captured heat susceptibility with respect to yield and flowering time, with main loadings for HSIDY in the negative range and for HSIFF and HSIMF in the positive range. PC2 had high loadings for HSIGM and an intermediate high loading for HSILS. In agreement with the loadings for the HSI in the PCA, we observed significant () negative correlations of HSIDY with HSIMF and HSIFF (Fig. 4), and the correlations of HSIDY with HSILS and HSIGM were negligably low () although they were significant. With respect to PC1 and PC2, only overlapping clusters of Dent × Dent types (populations 1 and 2), the Flint × Flint types (populations 3 and 4) and the Dent × Flint types (populations 5 and 6) were observed (Fig. 2).Fig. 4


First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Stability analysis of the adjusted entry means (AEM) relative to that of Einbeck of a dry yield (DY) and b the leaf scorching (LS) for the parental inbred lines over the AEM of four locations across all genotypes for calculation of the heat susceptibility index (HSI)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835532&req=5

Fig3: Stability analysis of the adjusted entry means (AEM) relative to that of Einbeck of a dry yield (DY) and b the leaf scorching (LS) for the parental inbred lines over the AEM of four locations across all genotypes for calculation of the heat susceptibility index (HSI)
Mentions: The first two PCs of the PCA (Fig. 2) explained 41 and 21 % of the total variance of all five HSI (linear regression to calculate HSIDY and HSILS of the parental inbreds, cf. Fig. 3). PC1 captured heat susceptibility with respect to yield and flowering time, with main loadings for HSIDY in the negative range and for HSIFF and HSIMF in the positive range. PC2 had high loadings for HSIGM and an intermediate high loading for HSILS. In agreement with the loadings for the HSI in the PCA, we observed significant () negative correlations of HSIDY with HSIMF and HSIFF (Fig. 4), and the correlations of HSIDY with HSILS and HSIGM were negligably low () although they were significant. With respect to PC1 and PC2, only overlapping clusters of Dent × Dent types (populations 1 and 2), the Flint × Flint types (populations 3 and 4) and the Dent × Flint types (populations 5 and 6) were observed (Fig. 2).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus