Limits...
First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Crossing scheme used to create six segregating populations (P1–6) with number of genotypes (N), derived from four Dent (S067, P040, S058 and S070, in blue) and four Flint (L012, L017, L043 and L023, in red) inbred lines
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Fig1: Crossing scheme used to create six segregating populations (P1–6) with number of genotypes (N), derived from four Dent (S067, P040, S058 and S070, in blue) and four Flint (L012, L017, L043 and L023, in red) inbred lines

Mentions: This study was based on segregating populations derived from pairwise crosses of four Dent (S058, S067, S070, P040) and four Flint (L043, L017, L023, L012) maize inbred lines from the University of Hohenheim (Andersen et al. 2005). The eight inbred lines have been selected from an experiment with 74 European maize inbreds in hydroponic culture by their tolerant and susceptible phenotypic reaction upon high temperatures during seedling stage (Reimer et al. 2013) and were in detail characterized for their heat tolerance during seedling stage by Frey et al. (2015). The inbreds have been crossed pairwisely to create two Dent × Dent, two Flint × Flint and two Dent × Flint F1 genotypes (Fig. 1). The F1 genotypes were further self-pollinated resulting in six segregating populations comprising between 75 and 107 F3:5 genotypes and with a total of genotypes.Fig. 1


First steps to understand heat tolerance of temperate maize at adult stage: identification of QTL across multiple environments with connected segregating populations.

Frey FP, Presterl T, Lecoq P, Orlik A, Stich B - Theor. Appl. Genet. (2016)

Crossing scheme used to create six segregating populations (P1–6) with number of genotypes (N), derived from four Dent (S067, P040, S058 and S070, in blue) and four Flint (L012, L017, L043 and L023, in red) inbred lines
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835532&req=5

Fig1: Crossing scheme used to create six segregating populations (P1–6) with number of genotypes (N), derived from four Dent (S067, P040, S058 and S070, in blue) and four Flint (L012, L017, L043 and L023, in red) inbred lines
Mentions: This study was based on segregating populations derived from pairwise crosses of four Dent (S058, S067, S070, P040) and four Flint (L043, L017, L023, L012) maize inbred lines from the University of Hohenheim (Andersen et al. 2005). The eight inbred lines have been selected from an experiment with 74 European maize inbreds in hydroponic culture by their tolerant and susceptible phenotypic reaction upon high temperatures during seedling stage (Reimer et al. 2013) and were in detail characterized for their heat tolerance during seedling stage by Frey et al. (2015). The inbreds have been crossed pairwisely to create two Dent × Dent, two Flint × Flint and two Dent × Flint F1 genotypes (Fig. 1). The F1 genotypes were further self-pollinated resulting in six segregating populations comprising between 75 and 107 F3:5 genotypes and with a total of genotypes.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production.Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL.To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Key message: Dents were more heat tolerant than Flints. QTL for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield at field conditions were identified considering multiple populations and environments. High temperatures have the potential to cause severe damages to maize production. This study aims to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of heat tolerance under field conditions in maize and the genome regions contributing to natural variation. In our study, heat tolerance was assessed on a multi-environment level under non-controlled field conditions for a set of connected intra- and interpool Dent and Flint populations. Our findings indicate that Dent are more heat tolerant during adult stage than Flint genotypes. We identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) including 2 loci for heat tolerance with respect to grain yield. Furthermore, we identified six heat-tolerance and 112 heat-responsive candidate genes colocating with the previously mentioned QTL. To investigate their contribution to the response to heat stress and heat tolerance, differential expression and sequence variation of the identified candidate genes should be subjected to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus