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Recalling visual serial order for verbal sequences.

Logie RH, Saito S, Morita A, Varma S, Norris D - Mem Cognit (2016)

Bottom Line: These data provide new evidence that retaining a sequence of visual codes relies on similar principles to those that govern the retention of a sequence of phonological codes.We further illustrate this by demonstrating that the data patterns can be readily simulated by at least one computational model of serial-ordered recall, the Primacy model (Page and Norris, Psychological Review, 105(4), 761-81, 1998).Together with previous evidence from neuropsychological studies and experimental studies with healthy adults, these results are interpreted as consistent with two domain-specific, limited-capacity, temporary memory systems for phonological material and for visual material, respectively, each of which uses similar processes that have evolved to be optimal for retention of serial order.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Cognitive Neuroscience, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH16 6JF, UK. rlogie@staffmail.ed.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
We report three experiments in which participants performed written serial recall of visually presented verbal sequences with items varying in visual similarity. In Experiments 1 and 2 native speakers of Japanese recalled visually presented Japanese Kanji characters. In Experiment 3, native speakers of English recalled visually presented words. In all experiments, items varied in visual similarity and were controlled for phonological similarity. For Kanji and for English, performance on lists comprising visually similar items was overall poorer than for lists of visually distinct items across all serial positions. For mixed lists in which visually similar and visually distinct items alternated through the list, a clear "zig-zag" pattern appeared with better recall of the visually distinct items than for visually similar items. This is the first time that this zig-zag pattern has been shown for manipulations of visual similarity in serial-ordered recall. These data provide new evidence that retaining a sequence of visual codes relies on similar principles to those that govern the retention of a sequence of phonological codes. We further illustrate this by demonstrating that the data patterns can be readily simulated by at least one computational model of serial-ordered recall, the Primacy model (Page and Norris, Psychological Review, 105(4), 761-81, 1998). Together with previous evidence from neuropsychological studies and experimental studies with healthy adults, these results are interpreted as consistent with two domain-specific, limited-capacity, temporary memory systems for phonological material and for visual material, respectively, each of which uses similar processes that have evolved to be optimal for retention of serial order.

No MeSH data available.


Serial position curves in the proportion of order errors in Experiment 1, as a function of visual similarity for pure lists (Fig. 1a), for alternating lists (Fig. 1b), and for combined lists (Fig. 1c). The data are from 30 participants. However, due to the presence of zero correct item recall at some presentation positions (where the denominator becomes zero for proportion of order errors), the number of participants at serial position 4 of pure dissimilar lists and position 5 of pure similar lists were 29 in Fig. 1a, and that at serial position 4 of SD-alternating lists was 28 in Fig. 1b
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Fig1: Serial position curves in the proportion of order errors in Experiment 1, as a function of visual similarity for pure lists (Fig. 1a), for alternating lists (Fig. 1b), and for combined lists (Fig. 1c). The data are from 30 participants. However, due to the presence of zero correct item recall at some presentation positions (where the denominator becomes zero for proportion of order errors), the number of participants at serial position 4 of pure dissimilar lists and position 5 of pure similar lists were 29 in Fig. 1a, and that at serial position 4 of SD-alternating lists was 28 in Fig. 1b

Mentions: We examined the order error data for each condition. Figure 1a shows serial position curves for the proportion of order errors for the pure lists (pure lists for visually dissimilar vs. similar), Fig. 1b shows those of the alternating lists (DS alternating and SD alternating lists), and Fig. 1c shows those of the combined lists (DS combined and SD combined lists). A two-way ANOVA, with visual similarity factor (two levels: dissimilar vs. similar) and list structure factor (three levels: pure, alternating, and combined lists) revealed a significant main effect of visual similarity, indicating superior recall performance for dissimilar over similar items. A main effect of list structure was marginal. The interaction between the two factors was not significant. The mean proportion of order errors for Dissimilar-Pure, Similar-Pure, Dissimilar-Alternating, Similar-Alternating, Dissimilar-Combined, and Similar-Combined lists were .35, .41, .31, .42, .29, and .37, respectively.Fig. 1


Recalling visual serial order for verbal sequences.

Logie RH, Saito S, Morita A, Varma S, Norris D - Mem Cognit (2016)

Serial position curves in the proportion of order errors in Experiment 1, as a function of visual similarity for pure lists (Fig. 1a), for alternating lists (Fig. 1b), and for combined lists (Fig. 1c). The data are from 30 participants. However, due to the presence of zero correct item recall at some presentation positions (where the denominator becomes zero for proportion of order errors), the number of participants at serial position 4 of pure dissimilar lists and position 5 of pure similar lists were 29 in Fig. 1a, and that at serial position 4 of SD-alternating lists was 28 in Fig. 1b
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835526&req=5

Fig1: Serial position curves in the proportion of order errors in Experiment 1, as a function of visual similarity for pure lists (Fig. 1a), for alternating lists (Fig. 1b), and for combined lists (Fig. 1c). The data are from 30 participants. However, due to the presence of zero correct item recall at some presentation positions (where the denominator becomes zero for proportion of order errors), the number of participants at serial position 4 of pure dissimilar lists and position 5 of pure similar lists were 29 in Fig. 1a, and that at serial position 4 of SD-alternating lists was 28 in Fig. 1b
Mentions: We examined the order error data for each condition. Figure 1a shows serial position curves for the proportion of order errors for the pure lists (pure lists for visually dissimilar vs. similar), Fig. 1b shows those of the alternating lists (DS alternating and SD alternating lists), and Fig. 1c shows those of the combined lists (DS combined and SD combined lists). A two-way ANOVA, with visual similarity factor (two levels: dissimilar vs. similar) and list structure factor (three levels: pure, alternating, and combined lists) revealed a significant main effect of visual similarity, indicating superior recall performance for dissimilar over similar items. A main effect of list structure was marginal. The interaction between the two factors was not significant. The mean proportion of order errors for Dissimilar-Pure, Similar-Pure, Dissimilar-Alternating, Similar-Alternating, Dissimilar-Combined, and Similar-Combined lists were .35, .41, .31, .42, .29, and .37, respectively.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: These data provide new evidence that retaining a sequence of visual codes relies on similar principles to those that govern the retention of a sequence of phonological codes.We further illustrate this by demonstrating that the data patterns can be readily simulated by at least one computational model of serial-ordered recall, the Primacy model (Page and Norris, Psychological Review, 105(4), 761-81, 1998).Together with previous evidence from neuropsychological studies and experimental studies with healthy adults, these results are interpreted as consistent with two domain-specific, limited-capacity, temporary memory systems for phonological material and for visual material, respectively, each of which uses similar processes that have evolved to be optimal for retention of serial order.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Cognitive Neuroscience, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH16 6JF, UK. rlogie@staffmail.ed.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
We report three experiments in which participants performed written serial recall of visually presented verbal sequences with items varying in visual similarity. In Experiments 1 and 2 native speakers of Japanese recalled visually presented Japanese Kanji characters. In Experiment 3, native speakers of English recalled visually presented words. In all experiments, items varied in visual similarity and were controlled for phonological similarity. For Kanji and for English, performance on lists comprising visually similar items was overall poorer than for lists of visually distinct items across all serial positions. For mixed lists in which visually similar and visually distinct items alternated through the list, a clear "zig-zag" pattern appeared with better recall of the visually distinct items than for visually similar items. This is the first time that this zig-zag pattern has been shown for manipulations of visual similarity in serial-ordered recall. These data provide new evidence that retaining a sequence of visual codes relies on similar principles to those that govern the retention of a sequence of phonological codes. We further illustrate this by demonstrating that the data patterns can be readily simulated by at least one computational model of serial-ordered recall, the Primacy model (Page and Norris, Psychological Review, 105(4), 761-81, 1998). Together with previous evidence from neuropsychological studies and experimental studies with healthy adults, these results are interpreted as consistent with two domain-specific, limited-capacity, temporary memory systems for phonological material and for visual material, respectively, each of which uses similar processes that have evolved to be optimal for retention of serial order.

No MeSH data available.