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Same Performance Changes after Live High-Train Low in Normobaric vs. Hypobaric Hypoxia.

Saugy JJ, Schmitt L, Hauser A, Constantin G, Cejuela R, Faiss R, Wehrlin JP, Rosset J, Robinson N, Millet GP - Front Physiol (2016)

Bottom Line: No difference was found in hematological parameters.The 3-km run time was significantly faster in both conditions 21 days after LHTL (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.2 ± 6.4% for NH and HH), and no difference between conditions was found at any time.Increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Biology and Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland; Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We investigated the changes in physiological and performance parameters after a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in normobaric (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to reproduce the actual training practices of endurance athletes using a crossover-designed study.

Methods: Well-trained triathletes (n = 16) were split into two groups and completed two 18-day LTHL camps during which they trained at 1100-1200 m and lived at 2250 m (P i O2 = 111.9 ± 0.6 vs. 111.6 ± 0.6 mmHg) under NH (hypoxic chamber; FiO2 18.05 ± 0.03%) or HH (real altitude; barometric pressure 580.2 ± 2.9 mmHg) conditions. The subjects completed the NH and HH camps with a 1-year washout period. Measurements and protocol were identical for both phases of the crossover study. Oxygen saturation (S p O2) was constantly recorded nightly. P i O2 and training loads were matched daily. Blood samples and VO2max were measured before (Pre-) and 1 day after (Post-1) LHTL. A 3-km running-test was performed near sea level before and 1, 7, and 21 days after training camps.

Results: Total hypoxic exposure was lower for NH than for HH during LHTL (230 vs. 310 h; P < 0.001). Nocturnal S p O2 was higher in NH than in HH (92.4 ± 1.2 vs. 91.3 ± 1.0%, P < 0.001). VO2max increased to the same extent for NH and HH (4.9 ± 5.6 vs. 3.2 ± 5.1%). No difference was found in hematological parameters. The 3-km run time was significantly faster in both conditions 21 days after LHTL (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.2 ± 6.4% for NH and HH), and no difference between conditions was found at any time.

Conclusion: Increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean values of night oxygen pulse saturation (SpO2) for the crossover data. Data are presented in mean ± standard error. Pre1-Pre2: measurements before the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France); D01–D18: measurement during the camps (NH: hypoxic room in Prémanon, France; HH: Fiescheralp, Switzerland); Post1-Post2: measurements after the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France). #P < 0.05, ###P < 0.001 for differences between conditions.
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Figure 2: Mean values of night oxygen pulse saturation (SpO2) for the crossover data. Data are presented in mean ± standard error. Pre1-Pre2: measurements before the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France); D01–D18: measurement during the camps (NH: hypoxic room in Prémanon, France; HH: Fiescheralp, Switzerland); Post1-Post2: measurements after the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France). #P < 0.05, ###P < 0.001 for differences between conditions.

Mentions: Daily hypoxic dose (12.7 ± 0.5 vs. 17.1 ± 1.7 h, P < 0.001) and total hypoxic exposure (229.2 ± 5.9 vs. 309.9 ± 4.1 h, P < 0.001) were lower in NH than in HH. The average PiO2 values were not different between conditions (111.9 ± 0.6 vs. 111.6 ± 0.6 mmHg, for NH and HH). The nightly average of HR was higher for NH than for HH (51 ± 1 vs. 48 ± 2 bpm for NH and HH, P < 0.001), and these values stayed higher when returning to 1200 m in Prémanon during the two nights of post-test (51 ± 2 vs. 46 ± 2 bpm, for NH and HH, P < 0.001). Nightly SpO2 values were similar between two groups during the control nights (i.e., the two nights at 1150 m before LHTL camps, Pre-1 and Pre-2), but values were higher in NH than in HH during the entire camp (D1–D18; 92.4 ± 1.2 vs. 91.3 ± 1.0%, for NH and HH, P < 0.001). These values remained higher (P < 0.05) during the two nights at Post-1 (94.4 ± 0.9 vs. 93.6 ± 0.9%, for NH and HH, P < 0.05). All values are presented in Figure 2. In addition, the ODI 3% was significantly lower for NH than HH throughout the hypoxic nights (9.9 ± 1.6 vs. 15.1 ± 3.5, P < 0.001).


Same Performance Changes after Live High-Train Low in Normobaric vs. Hypobaric Hypoxia.

Saugy JJ, Schmitt L, Hauser A, Constantin G, Cejuela R, Faiss R, Wehrlin JP, Rosset J, Robinson N, Millet GP - Front Physiol (2016)

Mean values of night oxygen pulse saturation (SpO2) for the crossover data. Data are presented in mean ± standard error. Pre1-Pre2: measurements before the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France); D01–D18: measurement during the camps (NH: hypoxic room in Prémanon, France; HH: Fiescheralp, Switzerland); Post1-Post2: measurements after the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France). #P < 0.05, ###P < 0.001 for differences between conditions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835493&req=5

Figure 2: Mean values of night oxygen pulse saturation (SpO2) for the crossover data. Data are presented in mean ± standard error. Pre1-Pre2: measurements before the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France); D01–D18: measurement during the camps (NH: hypoxic room in Prémanon, France; HH: Fiescheralp, Switzerland); Post1-Post2: measurements after the camps (1150 m, Prémanon, France). #P < 0.05, ###P < 0.001 for differences between conditions.
Mentions: Daily hypoxic dose (12.7 ± 0.5 vs. 17.1 ± 1.7 h, P < 0.001) and total hypoxic exposure (229.2 ± 5.9 vs. 309.9 ± 4.1 h, P < 0.001) were lower in NH than in HH. The average PiO2 values were not different between conditions (111.9 ± 0.6 vs. 111.6 ± 0.6 mmHg, for NH and HH). The nightly average of HR was higher for NH than for HH (51 ± 1 vs. 48 ± 2 bpm for NH and HH, P < 0.001), and these values stayed higher when returning to 1200 m in Prémanon during the two nights of post-test (51 ± 2 vs. 46 ± 2 bpm, for NH and HH, P < 0.001). Nightly SpO2 values were similar between two groups during the control nights (i.e., the two nights at 1150 m before LHTL camps, Pre-1 and Pre-2), but values were higher in NH than in HH during the entire camp (D1–D18; 92.4 ± 1.2 vs. 91.3 ± 1.0%, for NH and HH, P < 0.001). These values remained higher (P < 0.05) during the two nights at Post-1 (94.4 ± 0.9 vs. 93.6 ± 0.9%, for NH and HH, P < 0.05). All values are presented in Figure 2. In addition, the ODI 3% was significantly lower for NH than HH throughout the hypoxic nights (9.9 ± 1.6 vs. 15.1 ± 3.5, P < 0.001).

Bottom Line: No difference was found in hematological parameters.The 3-km run time was significantly faster in both conditions 21 days after LHTL (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.2 ± 6.4% for NH and HH), and no difference between conditions was found at any time.Increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Biology and Medicine, Institute of Sport Sciences, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland; Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of LausanneLausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We investigated the changes in physiological and performance parameters after a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in normobaric (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to reproduce the actual training practices of endurance athletes using a crossover-designed study.

Methods: Well-trained triathletes (n = 16) were split into two groups and completed two 18-day LTHL camps during which they trained at 1100-1200 m and lived at 2250 m (P i O2 = 111.9 ± 0.6 vs. 111.6 ± 0.6 mmHg) under NH (hypoxic chamber; FiO2 18.05 ± 0.03%) or HH (real altitude; barometric pressure 580.2 ± 2.9 mmHg) conditions. The subjects completed the NH and HH camps with a 1-year washout period. Measurements and protocol were identical for both phases of the crossover study. Oxygen saturation (S p O2) was constantly recorded nightly. P i O2 and training loads were matched daily. Blood samples and VO2max were measured before (Pre-) and 1 day after (Post-1) LHTL. A 3-km running-test was performed near sea level before and 1, 7, and 21 days after training camps.

Results: Total hypoxic exposure was lower for NH than for HH during LHTL (230 vs. 310 h; P < 0.001). Nocturnal S p O2 was higher in NH than in HH (92.4 ± 1.2 vs. 91.3 ± 1.0%, P < 0.001). VO2max increased to the same extent for NH and HH (4.9 ± 5.6 vs. 3.2 ± 5.1%). No difference was found in hematological parameters. The 3-km run time was significantly faster in both conditions 21 days after LHTL (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.2 ± 6.4% for NH and HH), and no difference between conditions was found at any time.

Conclusion: Increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus