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Severe Obesity Shifts Metabolic Thresholds but Does Not Attenuate Aerobic Training Adaptations in Zucker Rats.

Rosa TS, Simões HG, Rogero MM, Moraes MR, Denadai BS, Arida RM, Andrade MS, Silva BM - Front Physiol (2016)

Bottom Line: Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons.The maximal lactate steady state velocity and maximal velocity were lower in the obese group at pre-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean), increased in both groups at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. pre), but were still lower in the obese group at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean).Training-induced increase in maximal lactate steady state, lactate threshold and glycemic threshold velocities was similar between groups (P > 0.05), whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P < 0.05 vs. lean).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Program in Translational Medicine, Federal University of São PauloSão Paulo, Brazil; Graduate Program in Physical Education and Health, Catholic University of BrasíliaBrasília, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Severe obesity affects metabolism with potential to influence the lactate and glycemic response to different exercise intensities in untrained and trained rats. Here we evaluated metabolic thresholds and maximal aerobic capacity in rats with severe obesity and lean counterparts at pre- and post-training. Zucker rats (obese: n = 10, lean: n = 10) were submitted to constant treadmill bouts, to determine the maximal lactate steady state, and an incremental treadmill test, to determine the lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal velocity at pre and post 8 weeks of treadmill training. Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons. The maximal lactate steady state velocity occurred at higher percentage of the maximal velocity in Zucker rats at pre-training than the percentage commonly reported and used for training prescription for other rat strains (i.e., 60%) (obese = 78 ± 9% and lean = 68 ± 5%, P < 0.05 vs. 60%). The maximal lactate steady state velocity and maximal velocity were lower in the obese group at pre-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean), increased in both groups at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. pre), but were still lower in the obese group at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean). Training-induced increase in maximal lactate steady state, lactate threshold and glycemic threshold velocities was similar between groups (P > 0.05), whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P < 0.05 vs. lean). In conclusion, lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal lactate steady state occurred at similar exercise intensity in Zucker rats at pre- and post-training. Severe obesity shifted metabolic thresholds to higher exercise intensity at pre-training, but did not attenuate submaximal and maximal aerobic training adaptations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box plot and dispersion of the glucose concentration during the incremental test in lean rats at pre- (A) and post-training (B) and obese rats at pre- (C) and post-training (D).
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Figure 2: Box plot and dispersion of the glucose concentration during the incremental test in lean rats at pre- (A) and post-training (B) and obese rats at pre- (C) and post-training (D).

Mentions: The [Lac] at the MLSS was 3.38 ± 0.27 mM, 3.18 ± 0.51 mM, 3.69 ± 0.37 mM, and 3.82 ± 0.36 mM, for lean pre-, lean post-, obese pre- and obese post-training, respectively (P > 0.05). Figures 1, 2 show the [Lac] and [Gluc] data, respectively, from all rats during the incremental protocol. From the box plots it is clear that data dispersion increases toward the end of the protocol. Figure 3 shows comparison between the MLSS velocity and the LT and GT velocities in both groups, at pre- and post-training. The LTv, GTv, LTs, and Log-log LTs velocities corresponded to the MLSS velocity in three within group comparisons (P > 0.05 vs. MLSS). The LTp velocity corresponded to the MLSS velocity in two within group comparisons (P > 0.05 vs. MLSS). The GTp velocity corresponded to the MLSS velocity in only one within group comparison (P > 0.05 vs. MLSS). Lastly, the Dmax velocity did not correspond to the MLSS velocity in any comparison (P < 0.05 vs. MLSS). Noteworthy, when the LT or GT velocities did not coincide with the MLSS velocity, the velocity of the LT and GT was higher than the MLSS velocity in all cases (P < 0.05), except one (GTv obese pre).


Severe Obesity Shifts Metabolic Thresholds but Does Not Attenuate Aerobic Training Adaptations in Zucker Rats.

Rosa TS, Simões HG, Rogero MM, Moraes MR, Denadai BS, Arida RM, Andrade MS, Silva BM - Front Physiol (2016)

Box plot and dispersion of the glucose concentration during the incremental test in lean rats at pre- (A) and post-training (B) and obese rats at pre- (C) and post-training (D).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835489&req=5

Figure 2: Box plot and dispersion of the glucose concentration during the incremental test in lean rats at pre- (A) and post-training (B) and obese rats at pre- (C) and post-training (D).
Mentions: The [Lac] at the MLSS was 3.38 ± 0.27 mM, 3.18 ± 0.51 mM, 3.69 ± 0.37 mM, and 3.82 ± 0.36 mM, for lean pre-, lean post-, obese pre- and obese post-training, respectively (P > 0.05). Figures 1, 2 show the [Lac] and [Gluc] data, respectively, from all rats during the incremental protocol. From the box plots it is clear that data dispersion increases toward the end of the protocol. Figure 3 shows comparison between the MLSS velocity and the LT and GT velocities in both groups, at pre- and post-training. The LTv, GTv, LTs, and Log-log LTs velocities corresponded to the MLSS velocity in three within group comparisons (P > 0.05 vs. MLSS). The LTp velocity corresponded to the MLSS velocity in two within group comparisons (P > 0.05 vs. MLSS). The GTp velocity corresponded to the MLSS velocity in only one within group comparison (P > 0.05 vs. MLSS). Lastly, the Dmax velocity did not correspond to the MLSS velocity in any comparison (P < 0.05 vs. MLSS). Noteworthy, when the LT or GT velocities did not coincide with the MLSS velocity, the velocity of the LT and GT was higher than the MLSS velocity in all cases (P < 0.05), except one (GTv obese pre).

Bottom Line: Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons.The maximal lactate steady state velocity and maximal velocity were lower in the obese group at pre-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean), increased in both groups at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. pre), but were still lower in the obese group at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean).Training-induced increase in maximal lactate steady state, lactate threshold and glycemic threshold velocities was similar between groups (P > 0.05), whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P < 0.05 vs. lean).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Program in Translational Medicine, Federal University of São PauloSão Paulo, Brazil; Graduate Program in Physical Education and Health, Catholic University of BrasíliaBrasília, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Severe obesity affects metabolism with potential to influence the lactate and glycemic response to different exercise intensities in untrained and trained rats. Here we evaluated metabolic thresholds and maximal aerobic capacity in rats with severe obesity and lean counterparts at pre- and post-training. Zucker rats (obese: n = 10, lean: n = 10) were submitted to constant treadmill bouts, to determine the maximal lactate steady state, and an incremental treadmill test, to determine the lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal velocity at pre and post 8 weeks of treadmill training. Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons. The maximal lactate steady state velocity occurred at higher percentage of the maximal velocity in Zucker rats at pre-training than the percentage commonly reported and used for training prescription for other rat strains (i.e., 60%) (obese = 78 ± 9% and lean = 68 ± 5%, P < 0.05 vs. 60%). The maximal lactate steady state velocity and maximal velocity were lower in the obese group at pre-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean), increased in both groups at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. pre), but were still lower in the obese group at post-training (P < 0.05 vs. lean). Training-induced increase in maximal lactate steady state, lactate threshold and glycemic threshold velocities was similar between groups (P > 0.05), whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P < 0.05 vs. lean). In conclusion, lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal lactate steady state occurred at similar exercise intensity in Zucker rats at pre- and post-training. Severe obesity shifted metabolic thresholds to higher exercise intensity at pre-training, but did not attenuate submaximal and maximal aerobic training adaptations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus