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Psychogenic Foreign Accent Syndrome: A New Case.

Keulen S, Verhoeven J, De Page L, Jonkers R, Bastiaanse R, Mariën P - Front Hum Neurosci (2016)

Bottom Line: Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic, and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed.Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS.The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, Vrije Universiteit BrusselBrussels, Belgium; Department of Linguistics, Center for Language and Cognition Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit GroningenGroningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents the case of a 33-year-old, right-handed, French-speaking Belgian lady who was involved in a car accident as a pedestrian. Six months after the incident she developed a German/Flemish-like accent. The patient's medical history, the onset of the FAS and the possible psychological causes of the accent change are analyzed. Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic, and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed. The psychodiagnostic interview and testing will receive special attention, because these have been underreported in previous FAS case reports. Furthermore, an accent rating experiment was carried out in order to assess the foreign quality of the patient's speech. Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS. Several findings were considered essential in the diagnosis of psychogenic FAS: the psychological assessments as well as the clinical interview confirmed the presence of psychological problems, while neurological damage was excluded by means of repeated neuroimaging and neurological examinations. The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Moreover, the indifference of the patient toward her condition may also suggest a psychogenic etiology, as the opposite is usually observed in neurogenic FAS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correspondence analysis, displaying the associations between speakers and rating in a two-dimensional plan. As can be derived from the figure, both the Russian and the French speaker maintain an isolated position in the plain and are associated with opposite extremes of the continuum. The English/Dutch(Nl), Dutch(Be) and FAS speaker on the hand, are all grouped around the center ratings: 2,3,4, and 5.
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Figure 1: Correspondence analysis, displaying the associations between speakers and rating in a two-dimensional plan. As can be derived from the figure, both the Russian and the French speaker maintain an isolated position in the plain and are associated with opposite extremes of the continuum. The English/Dutch(Nl), Dutch(Be) and FAS speaker on the hand, are all grouped around the center ratings: 2,3,4, and 5.

Mentions: A correspondence analysis was performed to get a two dimensional image of the strength (distance) of the associations between rating and speakers, based on frequency counts (Table 5: correspondence table; Figure 1). This showed that the associations between the native French speaker and rating “7” were particularly strong. The FAS speaker was situated more toward the higher ratings (4, 5, 6, 7) than, for instance, both native Dutch speakers and even markedly more so than the Russian speaker (strongly associated with rating “1”), who clearly occupied a more isolated position on the two-dimensional plot.


Psychogenic Foreign Accent Syndrome: A New Case.

Keulen S, Verhoeven J, De Page L, Jonkers R, Bastiaanse R, Mariën P - Front Hum Neurosci (2016)

Correspondence analysis, displaying the associations between speakers and rating in a two-dimensional plan. As can be derived from the figure, both the Russian and the French speaker maintain an isolated position in the plain and are associated with opposite extremes of the continuum. The English/Dutch(Nl), Dutch(Be) and FAS speaker on the hand, are all grouped around the center ratings: 2,3,4, and 5.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835482&req=5

Figure 1: Correspondence analysis, displaying the associations between speakers and rating in a two-dimensional plan. As can be derived from the figure, both the Russian and the French speaker maintain an isolated position in the plain and are associated with opposite extremes of the continuum. The English/Dutch(Nl), Dutch(Be) and FAS speaker on the hand, are all grouped around the center ratings: 2,3,4, and 5.
Mentions: A correspondence analysis was performed to get a two dimensional image of the strength (distance) of the associations between rating and speakers, based on frequency counts (Table 5: correspondence table; Figure 1). This showed that the associations between the native French speaker and rating “7” were particularly strong. The FAS speaker was situated more toward the higher ratings (4, 5, 6, 7) than, for instance, both native Dutch speakers and even markedly more so than the Russian speaker (strongly associated with rating “1”), who clearly occupied a more isolated position on the two-dimensional plot.

Bottom Line: Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic, and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed.Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS.The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, Vrije Universiteit BrusselBrussels, Belgium; Department of Linguistics, Center for Language and Cognition Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit GroningenGroningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents the case of a 33-year-old, right-handed, French-speaking Belgian lady who was involved in a car accident as a pedestrian. Six months after the incident she developed a German/Flemish-like accent. The patient's medical history, the onset of the FAS and the possible psychological causes of the accent change are analyzed. Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic, and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed. The psychodiagnostic interview and testing will receive special attention, because these have been underreported in previous FAS case reports. Furthermore, an accent rating experiment was carried out in order to assess the foreign quality of the patient's speech. Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS. Several findings were considered essential in the diagnosis of psychogenic FAS: the psychological assessments as well as the clinical interview confirmed the presence of psychological problems, while neurological damage was excluded by means of repeated neuroimaging and neurological examinations. The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Moreover, the indifference of the patient toward her condition may also suggest a psychogenic etiology, as the opposite is usually observed in neurogenic FAS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus