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Brown Adipose Tissue Is Linked to a Distinct Thermoregulatory Response to Mild Cold in People.

Chondronikola M, Volpi E, Børsheim E, Chao T, Porter C, Annamalai P, Yfanti C, Labbe SM, Hurren NM, Malagaris I, Cesani F, Sidossis LS - Front Physiol (2016)

Bottom Line: BAT volume was associated with the cold-induced change in core temperature (p = 0.01) even after adjustment for age and adiposity.BAT+: 19.8 ± 0.3°C, p = 0.035) without shivering.The cold-induced change in core temperature (r = 0.79, p = 0.001) and supraclavicular temperature (r = 0.58, p = 0.014) correlated with BAT volume, suggesting that these non-invasive measures can be potentially used as surrogate markers of BAT when other methods to detect BAT are not available or their use is not warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metabolism Unit, Shriners Hospitals for Children-GalvestonTX, USA; Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical BranchGalveston, TX, USA; Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Texas Medical BranchGalveston, TX, USA; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University of AthensGreece.

ABSTRACT
Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in rodents. Its role in temperature homeostasis in people is less studied. To this end, we recruited 18 men [8 subjects with no/minimal BAT activity (BAT-) and 10 with pronounced BAT activity (BAT+)]. Each volunteer participated in a 6 h, individualized, non-shivering cold exposure protocol. BAT was quantified using positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Body core and skin temperatures were measured using a telemetric pill and wireless thermistors, respectively. Core body temperature decreased during cold exposure in the BAT- group only (-0.34°C, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.1, p = 0.03), while the cold-induced change in core temperature was significantly different between BAT+ and BAT- subjects (BAT+ vs. BAT-, 0.43°C, 95% CI: 0.20-0.65, p = 0.0014). BAT volume was associated with the cold-induced change in core temperature (p = 0.01) even after adjustment for age and adiposity. Compared to the BAT- group, BAT+ subjects tolerated a lower ambient temperature (BAT-: 20.6 ± 0.3°C vs. BAT+: 19.8 ± 0.3°C, p = 0.035) without shivering. The cold-induced change in core temperature (r = 0.79, p = 0.001) and supraclavicular temperature (r = 0.58, p = 0.014) correlated with BAT volume, suggesting that these non-invasive measures can be potentially used as surrogate markers of BAT when other methods to detect BAT are not available or their use is not warranted. These results demonstrate a physiologically significant role for BAT in thermoregulation in people. This trial has been registered with Clinaltrials.gov: NCT01791114 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01791114).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CONSORT diagram of the study.
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Figure 1: CONSORT diagram of the study.

Mentions: Twenty men enrolled in this study. Only healthy subjects qualified to participate. Informed written consent was obtained from all participants in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki; the University of Texas Medical Branch Institutional Review Board and the Institute for Translational Sciences (ITS) Scientific Review Committee approved the study protocol. From the subjects enrolled in the study, one participant dropped out, while body temperature data were not recorded for one participant due to equipment failure. Results from 18 participants were analyzed (Figure 1). This trial has been registered with Clinaltrials.gov: NCT01791114 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01791114).


Brown Adipose Tissue Is Linked to a Distinct Thermoregulatory Response to Mild Cold in People.

Chondronikola M, Volpi E, Børsheim E, Chao T, Porter C, Annamalai P, Yfanti C, Labbe SM, Hurren NM, Malagaris I, Cesani F, Sidossis LS - Front Physiol (2016)

CONSORT diagram of the study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835478&req=5

Figure 1: CONSORT diagram of the study.
Mentions: Twenty men enrolled in this study. Only healthy subjects qualified to participate. Informed written consent was obtained from all participants in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki; the University of Texas Medical Branch Institutional Review Board and the Institute for Translational Sciences (ITS) Scientific Review Committee approved the study protocol. From the subjects enrolled in the study, one participant dropped out, while body temperature data were not recorded for one participant due to equipment failure. Results from 18 participants were analyzed (Figure 1). This trial has been registered with Clinaltrials.gov: NCT01791114 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01791114).

Bottom Line: BAT volume was associated with the cold-induced change in core temperature (p = 0.01) even after adjustment for age and adiposity.BAT+: 19.8 ± 0.3°C, p = 0.035) without shivering.The cold-induced change in core temperature (r = 0.79, p = 0.001) and supraclavicular temperature (r = 0.58, p = 0.014) correlated with BAT volume, suggesting that these non-invasive measures can be potentially used as surrogate markers of BAT when other methods to detect BAT are not available or their use is not warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metabolism Unit, Shriners Hospitals for Children-GalvestonTX, USA; Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical BranchGalveston, TX, USA; Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Texas Medical BranchGalveston, TX, USA; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University of AthensGreece.

ABSTRACT
Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in rodents. Its role in temperature homeostasis in people is less studied. To this end, we recruited 18 men [8 subjects with no/minimal BAT activity (BAT-) and 10 with pronounced BAT activity (BAT+)]. Each volunteer participated in a 6 h, individualized, non-shivering cold exposure protocol. BAT was quantified using positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Body core and skin temperatures were measured using a telemetric pill and wireless thermistors, respectively. Core body temperature decreased during cold exposure in the BAT- group only (-0.34°C, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.1, p = 0.03), while the cold-induced change in core temperature was significantly different between BAT+ and BAT- subjects (BAT+ vs. BAT-, 0.43°C, 95% CI: 0.20-0.65, p = 0.0014). BAT volume was associated with the cold-induced change in core temperature (p = 0.01) even after adjustment for age and adiposity. Compared to the BAT- group, BAT+ subjects tolerated a lower ambient temperature (BAT-: 20.6 ± 0.3°C vs. BAT+: 19.8 ± 0.3°C, p = 0.035) without shivering. The cold-induced change in core temperature (r = 0.79, p = 0.001) and supraclavicular temperature (r = 0.58, p = 0.014) correlated with BAT volume, suggesting that these non-invasive measures can be potentially used as surrogate markers of BAT when other methods to detect BAT are not available or their use is not warranted. These results demonstrate a physiologically significant role for BAT in thermoregulation in people. This trial has been registered with Clinaltrials.gov: NCT01791114 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01791114).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus