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Canine Myiasis and Its Causal Agents in Northeastern Iran.

Moshaverinia A, Kazemi Mehrjerdi H - Iran J Parasitol (2016 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Myiasis is defined as the infestation of live human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae for a certain period.Myiasis cases were cured and fly larvae were identified by microscopy using the relevant standard identification keys.However, when treatment was given early enough, the larvae removed and the wound disinfected, the animals usually made a full recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept. of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Myiasis is defined as the infestation of live human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae for a certain period. There are reports indicating that dogs are the most common species affected by myiasis. This study was conducted to identify myiasis-causing flies in owned and stray dogs in Mashhad (Northeastern Iran).

Methods: A total of 435 owned dogs and 800 stray dogs were examined for myiasis. Myiasis cases were cured and fly larvae were identified by microscopy using the relevant standard identification keys.

Results: Ten out of 435 owned dogs (2.29 %) and 18 out of 800 stray dogs (2.25 %) had myiasis. The causative agents of myiasis in dogs based on their frequencies were as follows: Wohlfahrtia magnifica (50%), Lucilia sericata (28.57%) and Chrysomya albiceps (21.42%).

Conclusion: W. magnifica was the most important myiasis-causing fly among the dogs sampled here, sometimes causing very serious damages. However, when treatment was given early enough, the larvae removed and the wound disinfected, the animals usually made a full recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Morphological structures of anterior spiracle (A), cephalopharyngeal skeleton (B) and posterior spiracle (C) of third instar larva of C. albiceps
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 3: Morphological structures of anterior spiracle (A), cephalopharyngeal skeleton (B) and posterior spiracle (C) of third instar larva of C. albiceps

Mentions: Identification of these species was carried out by examination of morphological features of cephalopharyngeal skeleton, anterior and posterior spiracles of third-stage larvae (Fig. 1–3).


Canine Myiasis and Its Causal Agents in Northeastern Iran.

Moshaverinia A, Kazemi Mehrjerdi H - Iran J Parasitol (2016 Jan-Mar)

Morphological structures of anterior spiracle (A), cephalopharyngeal skeleton (B) and posterior spiracle (C) of third instar larva of C. albiceps
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835475&req=5

Figure 3: Morphological structures of anterior spiracle (A), cephalopharyngeal skeleton (B) and posterior spiracle (C) of third instar larva of C. albiceps
Mentions: Identification of these species was carried out by examination of morphological features of cephalopharyngeal skeleton, anterior and posterior spiracles of third-stage larvae (Fig. 1–3).

Bottom Line: Myiasis is defined as the infestation of live human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae for a certain period.Myiasis cases were cured and fly larvae were identified by microscopy using the relevant standard identification keys.However, when treatment was given early enough, the larvae removed and the wound disinfected, the animals usually made a full recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept. of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Myiasis is defined as the infestation of live human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae for a certain period. There are reports indicating that dogs are the most common species affected by myiasis. This study was conducted to identify myiasis-causing flies in owned and stray dogs in Mashhad (Northeastern Iran).

Methods: A total of 435 owned dogs and 800 stray dogs were examined for myiasis. Myiasis cases were cured and fly larvae were identified by microscopy using the relevant standard identification keys.

Results: Ten out of 435 owned dogs (2.29 %) and 18 out of 800 stray dogs (2.25 %) had myiasis. The causative agents of myiasis in dogs based on their frequencies were as follows: Wohlfahrtia magnifica (50%), Lucilia sericata (28.57%) and Chrysomya albiceps (21.42%).

Conclusion: W. magnifica was the most important myiasis-causing fly among the dogs sampled here, sometimes causing very serious damages. However, when treatment was given early enough, the larvae removed and the wound disinfected, the animals usually made a full recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus