Limits...
Estimating Fiber Orientation Distribution Functions in 3D-Polarized Light Imaging.

Axer M, Strohmer S, Gräßel D, Bücker O, Dohmen M, Reckfort J, Zilles K, Amunts K - Front Neuroanat (2016)

Bottom Line: We have successfully established a concept to bridge the spatial scales from microscopic fiber orientation measurements based on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) to meso- or macroscopic dimensions.By creating orientation distribution functions (pliODFs) from high-resolution vector data via series expansion with spherical harmonics utilizing high performance computing and supercomputing technologies, data fusion with Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become feasible, even for a large-scale dataset such as the human brain.Validation of our approach was done effectively by means of two types of datasets that were transferred from fiber orientation maps into pliODFs: simulated 3D-PLI data showing artificial, but clearly defined fiber patterns and real 3D-PLI data derived from sections through the human brain and the brain of a hooded seal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Centre Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine Jülich, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Research of the human brain connectome requires multiscale approaches derived from independent imaging methods ideally applied to the same object. Hence, comprehensible strategies for data integration across modalities and across scales are essential. We have successfully established a concept to bridge the spatial scales from microscopic fiber orientation measurements based on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) to meso- or macroscopic dimensions. By creating orientation distribution functions (pliODFs) from high-resolution vector data via series expansion with spherical harmonics utilizing high performance computing and supercomputing technologies, data fusion with Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become feasible, even for a large-scale dataset such as the human brain. Validation of our approach was done effectively by means of two types of datasets that were transferred from fiber orientation maps into pliODFs: simulated 3D-PLI data showing artificial, but clearly defined fiber patterns and real 3D-PLI data derived from sections through the human brain and the brain of a hooded seal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Runtime measurements. Runtime as a function of the super-voxel dimension for the series expansion up to the 6th and the 8th band. Note, that the left time axis is scaled logarithmically, while the right time axis is scaled linearly.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835454&req=5

Figure 8: Runtime measurements. Runtime as a function of the super-voxel dimension for the series expansion up to the 6th and the 8th band. Note, that the left time axis is scaled logarithmically, while the right time axis is scaled linearly.

Mentions: Runtime measurements (for 3712 × 4576 orientation vectors) performed on the JuDGE supercomputer showed that (i) with increasing super-voxel size the overall runtime decreased and (ii) with increasing depth of expansion the overall runtime increased (cf. Figure 8).


Estimating Fiber Orientation Distribution Functions in 3D-Polarized Light Imaging.

Axer M, Strohmer S, Gräßel D, Bücker O, Dohmen M, Reckfort J, Zilles K, Amunts K - Front Neuroanat (2016)

Runtime measurements. Runtime as a function of the super-voxel dimension for the series expansion up to the 6th and the 8th band. Note, that the left time axis is scaled logarithmically, while the right time axis is scaled linearly.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835454&req=5

Figure 8: Runtime measurements. Runtime as a function of the super-voxel dimension for the series expansion up to the 6th and the 8th band. Note, that the left time axis is scaled logarithmically, while the right time axis is scaled linearly.
Mentions: Runtime measurements (for 3712 × 4576 orientation vectors) performed on the JuDGE supercomputer showed that (i) with increasing super-voxel size the overall runtime decreased and (ii) with increasing depth of expansion the overall runtime increased (cf. Figure 8).

Bottom Line: We have successfully established a concept to bridge the spatial scales from microscopic fiber orientation measurements based on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) to meso- or macroscopic dimensions.By creating orientation distribution functions (pliODFs) from high-resolution vector data via series expansion with spherical harmonics utilizing high performance computing and supercomputing technologies, data fusion with Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become feasible, even for a large-scale dataset such as the human brain.Validation of our approach was done effectively by means of two types of datasets that were transferred from fiber orientation maps into pliODFs: simulated 3D-PLI data showing artificial, but clearly defined fiber patterns and real 3D-PLI data derived from sections through the human brain and the brain of a hooded seal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Centre Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine Jülich, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Research of the human brain connectome requires multiscale approaches derived from independent imaging methods ideally applied to the same object. Hence, comprehensible strategies for data integration across modalities and across scales are essential. We have successfully established a concept to bridge the spatial scales from microscopic fiber orientation measurements based on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) to meso- or macroscopic dimensions. By creating orientation distribution functions (pliODFs) from high-resolution vector data via series expansion with spherical harmonics utilizing high performance computing and supercomputing technologies, data fusion with Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become feasible, even for a large-scale dataset such as the human brain. Validation of our approach was done effectively by means of two types of datasets that were transferred from fiber orientation maps into pliODFs: simulated 3D-PLI data showing artificial, but clearly defined fiber patterns and real 3D-PLI data derived from sections through the human brain and the brain of a hooded seal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus