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Phenylacetic Acid Is ISR Determinant Produced by Bacillus fortis IAGS162, Which Involves Extensive Re-modulation in Metabolomics of Tomato to Protect against Fusarium Wilt.

Akram W, Anjum T, Ali B - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Bottom Line: Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations.In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA.This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore Lahore, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
Bacillus fortis IAGS162 has been previously shown to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt disease. In the first phase of current study, the ISR determinant was isolated from extracellular metabolites of this bacterium. ISR bioassays combined with solvent extraction, column chromatography and GC/MS analysis proved that phenylacetic acid (PAA) was the potential ISR determinant that significantly ameliorated Fusarium wilt disease of tomato at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. In the second phase, the biochemical basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) under influence of PAA was elucidated by performing non-targeted whole metabolomics through GC/MS analysis. Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations. Exposure to PAA and subsequent pathogen challenge extensively re-modulated tomato metabolic networks along with defense related pathways. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA. This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An overview of changes in phenylpropenoid pathway of tomato plants under influence of PAA and fusarium wilt pathogen. Comparison was made between two treatments viz: 1 = Plants receiving PAA and F. oxysporum, 2 = plants receiving F. oxysporum alone (considered as control). Metabolites in red font color show significant increase over control as governed by ANOVA at P ≤ 0.05. Black font represent no significant change as compared to control. Gray color represent metabolites not detected.
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Figure 6: An overview of changes in phenylpropenoid pathway of tomato plants under influence of PAA and fusarium wilt pathogen. Comparison was made between two treatments viz: 1 = Plants receiving PAA and F. oxysporum, 2 = plants receiving F. oxysporum alone (considered as control). Metabolites in red font color show significant increase over control as governed by ANOVA at P ≤ 0.05. Black font represent no significant change as compared to control. Gray color represent metabolites not detected.

Mentions: In general, analysis of tomato plants challenged by PAA and F. oxysporum showed that the primary metabolism was significantly reprogrammed in both cases but with different consequences (Figure 4). Number of metabolites involved in the shikimate and the phenylpropanoid pathways were up-regulated under influence of either pathogen alone on in combination to PAA as compared to the control plants (Figures 4 and 6). However, some metabolites specifically precursors of phenylpropanoid pathway were not significantly up-regulated by pathogen alone viz: (tryptophan, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxybenzene) although they were induced by PAA in combination to the pathogen (Figures 4 and 6).


Phenylacetic Acid Is ISR Determinant Produced by Bacillus fortis IAGS162, Which Involves Extensive Re-modulation in Metabolomics of Tomato to Protect against Fusarium Wilt.

Akram W, Anjum T, Ali B - Front Plant Sci (2016)

An overview of changes in phenylpropenoid pathway of tomato plants under influence of PAA and fusarium wilt pathogen. Comparison was made between two treatments viz: 1 = Plants receiving PAA and F. oxysporum, 2 = plants receiving F. oxysporum alone (considered as control). Metabolites in red font color show significant increase over control as governed by ANOVA at P ≤ 0.05. Black font represent no significant change as compared to control. Gray color represent metabolites not detected.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835451&req=5

Figure 6: An overview of changes in phenylpropenoid pathway of tomato plants under influence of PAA and fusarium wilt pathogen. Comparison was made between two treatments viz: 1 = Plants receiving PAA and F. oxysporum, 2 = plants receiving F. oxysporum alone (considered as control). Metabolites in red font color show significant increase over control as governed by ANOVA at P ≤ 0.05. Black font represent no significant change as compared to control. Gray color represent metabolites not detected.
Mentions: In general, analysis of tomato plants challenged by PAA and F. oxysporum showed that the primary metabolism was significantly reprogrammed in both cases but with different consequences (Figure 4). Number of metabolites involved in the shikimate and the phenylpropanoid pathways were up-regulated under influence of either pathogen alone on in combination to PAA as compared to the control plants (Figures 4 and 6). However, some metabolites specifically precursors of phenylpropanoid pathway were not significantly up-regulated by pathogen alone viz: (tryptophan, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxybenzene) although they were induced by PAA in combination to the pathogen (Figures 4 and 6).

Bottom Line: Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations.In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA.This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore Lahore, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
Bacillus fortis IAGS162 has been previously shown to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt disease. In the first phase of current study, the ISR determinant was isolated from extracellular metabolites of this bacterium. ISR bioassays combined with solvent extraction, column chromatography and GC/MS analysis proved that phenylacetic acid (PAA) was the potential ISR determinant that significantly ameliorated Fusarium wilt disease of tomato at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. In the second phase, the biochemical basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) under influence of PAA was elucidated by performing non-targeted whole metabolomics through GC/MS analysis. Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations. Exposure to PAA and subsequent pathogen challenge extensively re-modulated tomato metabolic networks along with defense related pathways. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA. This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus