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Don't Always Prefer My Chosen Objects: Low Level of Trait Autonomy and Autonomy Deprivation Decreases Mere Choice Effect.

Shang Z, Tao T, Wang L - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: Choice effect is a robust phenomenon in which even "mere choice" that does not include actual choosing actions could result in more preference for the self-chosen objects over other-chosen objects.In the current research, we proposed that autonomy would impact the mere choice effect.The results showed that the mere choice effect measured by Implicit Association Test (IAT) significantly decreased for participants with lower levels of trait autonomy (Study 1) and when participants were primed to experience autonomy deprivation (Study 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health, Peking University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Choice effect is a robust phenomenon in which even "mere choice" that does not include actual choosing actions could result in more preference for the self-chosen objects over other-chosen objects. In the current research, we proposed that autonomy would impact the mere choice effect. We conducted two studies to examine the hypothesis. The results showed that the mere choice effect measured by Implicit Association Test (IAT) significantly decreased for participants with lower levels of trait autonomy (Study 1) and when participants were primed to experience autonomy deprivation (Study 2). The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reaction time of compatible and incompatible evaluation conditions under the autonomy fulfillment, autonomy deprivation, and control condition in Study 2.
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Figure 1: Reaction time of compatible and incompatible evaluation conditions under the autonomy fulfillment, autonomy deprivation, and control condition in Study 2.

Mentions: To further identify how autonomy affects RT in compatible condition and incompatible condition, we analyzed a 3 (autonomy priming manipulation: the autonomy fulfillment condition, the control condition, and the autonomy deprivation condition) by 2 (choice-attitude valence compatibility level: the compatible condition and the incompatible condition) mixed design, in which the autonomy priming manipulation was a between-subject variable and the choice-attitude valence compatible level was a within-subject variable. A two-way repeated ANOVA of autonomy priming manipulation and choicer-attitude valence compatible on response time was conducted, controlling for gender and age (see Figure 1). The results showed a main effect: autonomy priming manipulation was significant, F(2,61) = 5.341, p = 0.007, η2 = 0.15. The response time in the autonomy fulfillment group (MRT = 892 ms, SD = 45 ms) was significantly longer than that in the control group (MRT = 713 ms, SD = 46 ms), F(1,42) = 7.406, p = 0.01, η2 = 0.155. The response time in the autonomy deprivation group (MRT = 906 ms, SD = 46 ms) was also significantly longer than that in the control group (MRT = 713 ms, SD = 46 ms), F(1,41) = 8.477, p = 0.006, η2 = 0.174. The response time in the autonomy deprivation group (MRT = 906 ms, SD = 46 ms) was not significantly longer than that in the autonomy fulfillment group (MRT = 892 ms, SD = 46 ms), F(1,42) = 0.142, p = 0.709, η2 = 0.003. These results indicated that autonomy priming (whether fulfillment or deprivation) led to slower participant RTs. A main effect of choice-attitude valence compatibility level on response time was significant, F(1,61) = 11.877, p = 0.001, η2 = 0.15. The response time of incompatible trials (M = 882 ms, SD = 28 ms) was significantly longer than that of compatible trials (M = 793 ms, SD = 28 ms), indicating the conflict of objects and adjectives in the incompatible condition.


Don't Always Prefer My Chosen Objects: Low Level of Trait Autonomy and Autonomy Deprivation Decreases Mere Choice Effect.

Shang Z, Tao T, Wang L - Front Psychol (2016)

Reaction time of compatible and incompatible evaluation conditions under the autonomy fulfillment, autonomy deprivation, and control condition in Study 2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835440&req=5

Figure 1: Reaction time of compatible and incompatible evaluation conditions under the autonomy fulfillment, autonomy deprivation, and control condition in Study 2.
Mentions: To further identify how autonomy affects RT in compatible condition and incompatible condition, we analyzed a 3 (autonomy priming manipulation: the autonomy fulfillment condition, the control condition, and the autonomy deprivation condition) by 2 (choice-attitude valence compatibility level: the compatible condition and the incompatible condition) mixed design, in which the autonomy priming manipulation was a between-subject variable and the choice-attitude valence compatible level was a within-subject variable. A two-way repeated ANOVA of autonomy priming manipulation and choicer-attitude valence compatible on response time was conducted, controlling for gender and age (see Figure 1). The results showed a main effect: autonomy priming manipulation was significant, F(2,61) = 5.341, p = 0.007, η2 = 0.15. The response time in the autonomy fulfillment group (MRT = 892 ms, SD = 45 ms) was significantly longer than that in the control group (MRT = 713 ms, SD = 46 ms), F(1,42) = 7.406, p = 0.01, η2 = 0.155. The response time in the autonomy deprivation group (MRT = 906 ms, SD = 46 ms) was also significantly longer than that in the control group (MRT = 713 ms, SD = 46 ms), F(1,41) = 8.477, p = 0.006, η2 = 0.174. The response time in the autonomy deprivation group (MRT = 906 ms, SD = 46 ms) was not significantly longer than that in the autonomy fulfillment group (MRT = 892 ms, SD = 46 ms), F(1,42) = 0.142, p = 0.709, η2 = 0.003. These results indicated that autonomy priming (whether fulfillment or deprivation) led to slower participant RTs. A main effect of choice-attitude valence compatibility level on response time was significant, F(1,61) = 11.877, p = 0.001, η2 = 0.15. The response time of incompatible trials (M = 882 ms, SD = 28 ms) was significantly longer than that of compatible trials (M = 793 ms, SD = 28 ms), indicating the conflict of objects and adjectives in the incompatible condition.

Bottom Line: Choice effect is a robust phenomenon in which even "mere choice" that does not include actual choosing actions could result in more preference for the self-chosen objects over other-chosen objects.In the current research, we proposed that autonomy would impact the mere choice effect.The results showed that the mere choice effect measured by Implicit Association Test (IAT) significantly decreased for participants with lower levels of trait autonomy (Study 1) and when participants were primed to experience autonomy deprivation (Study 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health, Peking University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Choice effect is a robust phenomenon in which even "mere choice" that does not include actual choosing actions could result in more preference for the self-chosen objects over other-chosen objects. In the current research, we proposed that autonomy would impact the mere choice effect. We conducted two studies to examine the hypothesis. The results showed that the mere choice effect measured by Implicit Association Test (IAT) significantly decreased for participants with lower levels of trait autonomy (Study 1) and when participants were primed to experience autonomy deprivation (Study 2). The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus