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A Role of DLPFC in the Learning Process of Human Mate Copying.

Zhuang JY, Xie J, Hu D, Fan M, Zheng L - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: In the current study, we conducted a behavioral experiment to test the mate coping effect and a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment to test the neural basis involved in the social learning process of mate copying.In the behavioral experiment, participants were asked to rate the attractiveness of isolated opposite-sex (potential mates) facial photographs, then shown the targets associating with a neutral-faced model with textual cues indicating the models' attitude (interested vs. not-interested) toward the potential mates, and then asked to re-evaluate the potential mates' attractiveness.The mate copying effect was confirmed in the behavioral experiment -greater increase in attractiveness ratings was observed for opposite-sex photographs in the interested than in the not-interested condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
In the current study, we conducted a behavioral experiment to test the mate coping effect and a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment to test the neural basis involved in the social learning process of mate copying. In the behavioral experiment, participants were asked to rate the attractiveness of isolated opposite-sex (potential mates) facial photographs, then shown the targets associating with a neutral-faced model with textual cues indicating the models' attitude (interested vs. not-interested) toward the potential mates, and then asked to re-evaluate the potential mates' attractiveness. Using a similar procedure as the behavioral experiment, participants were scanned while observing the compound images in the fMRI experiment. The mate copying effect was confirmed in the behavioral experiment -greater increase in attractiveness ratings was observed for opposite-sex photographs in the interested than in the not-interested condition. The fMRI results showed that the dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus (DLPFC) was significantly active in the comparison of interested > not-interested condition, suggesting that a cognitive integration and selection function may be involved when participants process information from conditions related to mate copying.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Greater activations in bilateral DLPFC were found in the interested condition compared to the not-interested condition when participants viewing the compound images. Error bars indicate one SEM. I, interested condition; NI, not-interested condition.
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Figure 3: Greater activations in bilateral DLPFC were found in the interested condition compared to the not-interested condition when participants viewing the compound images. Error bars indicate one SEM. I, interested condition; NI, not-interested condition.

Mentions: In the comparison of interested > not-interested condition, the bilateral DLPFCs were observed significantly activated (Figure 3), but not in the reverse comparison (not-interested > interested) (see Table 1). These results confirmed our hypothesis that the DLPFC should be involved in the learning process of mate copying.


A Role of DLPFC in the Learning Process of Human Mate Copying.

Zhuang JY, Xie J, Hu D, Fan M, Zheng L - Front Psychol (2016)

Greater activations in bilateral DLPFC were found in the interested condition compared to the not-interested condition when participants viewing the compound images. Error bars indicate one SEM. I, interested condition; NI, not-interested condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835439&req=5

Figure 3: Greater activations in bilateral DLPFC were found in the interested condition compared to the not-interested condition when participants viewing the compound images. Error bars indicate one SEM. I, interested condition; NI, not-interested condition.
Mentions: In the comparison of interested > not-interested condition, the bilateral DLPFCs were observed significantly activated (Figure 3), but not in the reverse comparison (not-interested > interested) (see Table 1). These results confirmed our hypothesis that the DLPFC should be involved in the learning process of mate copying.

Bottom Line: In the current study, we conducted a behavioral experiment to test the mate coping effect and a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment to test the neural basis involved in the social learning process of mate copying.In the behavioral experiment, participants were asked to rate the attractiveness of isolated opposite-sex (potential mates) facial photographs, then shown the targets associating with a neutral-faced model with textual cues indicating the models' attitude (interested vs. not-interested) toward the potential mates, and then asked to re-evaluate the potential mates' attractiveness.The mate copying effect was confirmed in the behavioral experiment -greater increase in attractiveness ratings was observed for opposite-sex photographs in the interested than in the not-interested condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
In the current study, we conducted a behavioral experiment to test the mate coping effect and a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment to test the neural basis involved in the social learning process of mate copying. In the behavioral experiment, participants were asked to rate the attractiveness of isolated opposite-sex (potential mates) facial photographs, then shown the targets associating with a neutral-faced model with textual cues indicating the models' attitude (interested vs. not-interested) toward the potential mates, and then asked to re-evaluate the potential mates' attractiveness. Using a similar procedure as the behavioral experiment, participants were scanned while observing the compound images in the fMRI experiment. The mate copying effect was confirmed in the behavioral experiment -greater increase in attractiveness ratings was observed for opposite-sex photographs in the interested than in the not-interested condition. The fMRI results showed that the dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus (DLPFC) was significantly active in the comparison of interested > not-interested condition, suggesting that a cognitive integration and selection function may be involved when participants process information from conditions related to mate copying.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus