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Modified bathroom scale and balance assessment: a comparison with clinical tests.

Duchêne J, Hewson D, Rumeau P - Springerplus (2016)

Bottom Line: Raw data, partial scores and the global score were compared with the results of the three geriatric tests.ROC curves for OS cut-off values (4 and 5 s) were produced, with the best results obtained for a 5 s cut-off, both with the partial scores combined using Fisher's combination (specificity 85 %: <0.11, sensitivity 85 %: >0.48), and with the empirical score (specificity 85 %: <7, sensitivity 85 %: >8).A BQT empirical score of less than seven can detect fall risk in a community dwelling population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut Charles Delaunay, UMR CNRS 6279, University of Technology of Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, CS 42060, 10004 Troyes, France.

ABSTRACT
Frailty and detection of fall risk are major issues in preventive gerontology. A simple tool frequently used in daily life, a bathroom scale (balance quality tester: BQT), was modified to obtain information on the balance of 84 outpatients consulting at a geriatric clinic. The results computed from the BQT were compared to the values of three geriatric tests that are widely used either to detect a fall risk or frailty (timed get up and go: TUG; 10 m walking speed: WS; walking time: WT; one-leg stand: OS). The BQT calculates four parameters that are then scored and weighted, thus creating an overall indicator of balance quality. Raw data, partial scores and the global score were compared with the results of the three geriatric tests. The WT values had the highest correlation with BQT raw data (r = 0.55), while TUG (r = 0.53) and WS (r = 0.56) had the highest correlation with BQT partial scores. ROC curves for OS cut-off values (4 and 5 s) were produced, with the best results obtained for a 5 s cut-off, both with the partial scores combined using Fisher's combination (specificity 85 %: <0.11, sensitivity 85 %: >0.48), and with the empirical score (specificity 85 %: <7, sensitivity 85 %: >8). A BQT empirical score of less than seven can detect fall risk in a community dwelling population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a The BQT, with the forces measured and the CoP calculated; b a typical recording of the BQT for an older adult showing the period where each parameter is calculated
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Fig1: a The BQT, with the forces measured and the CoP calculated; b a typical recording of the BQT for an older adult showing the period where each parameter is calculated

Mentions: A new device has been developed that can overcome the problems identified for home use of force plates, while still providing accurate measurement of balance quality. This device, which is a modified bathroom scale (balance quality tester: BQT), acts like a force plate, but still looks like a bathroom scale (Duchêne and Hewson 2011). The BQT is based on a standard scale, with some modifications in order to collect the raw data produced by each of the four sensors of the scale. The instantaneous vertical force (Fz) is then reconstructed as the sum of the forces measured by each sensor, while the position of the CoP can be estimated as the barycentre of these four forces. The current version of the scale and an illustration of the forces and CoP can be seen in Fig. 1. A detailed description of the BQT can be found in (Duchêne and Hewson 2011).Fig. 1


Modified bathroom scale and balance assessment: a comparison with clinical tests.

Duchêne J, Hewson D, Rumeau P - Springerplus (2016)

a The BQT, with the forces measured and the CoP calculated; b a typical recording of the BQT for an older adult showing the period where each parameter is calculated
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835412&req=5

Fig1: a The BQT, with the forces measured and the CoP calculated; b a typical recording of the BQT for an older adult showing the period where each parameter is calculated
Mentions: A new device has been developed that can overcome the problems identified for home use of force plates, while still providing accurate measurement of balance quality. This device, which is a modified bathroom scale (balance quality tester: BQT), acts like a force plate, but still looks like a bathroom scale (Duchêne and Hewson 2011). The BQT is based on a standard scale, with some modifications in order to collect the raw data produced by each of the four sensors of the scale. The instantaneous vertical force (Fz) is then reconstructed as the sum of the forces measured by each sensor, while the position of the CoP can be estimated as the barycentre of these four forces. The current version of the scale and an illustration of the forces and CoP can be seen in Fig. 1. A detailed description of the BQT can be found in (Duchêne and Hewson 2011).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Raw data, partial scores and the global score were compared with the results of the three geriatric tests.ROC curves for OS cut-off values (4 and 5 s) were produced, with the best results obtained for a 5 s cut-off, both with the partial scores combined using Fisher's combination (specificity 85 %: <0.11, sensitivity 85 %: >0.48), and with the empirical score (specificity 85 %: <7, sensitivity 85 %: >8).A BQT empirical score of less than seven can detect fall risk in a community dwelling population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut Charles Delaunay, UMR CNRS 6279, University of Technology of Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, CS 42060, 10004 Troyes, France.

ABSTRACT
Frailty and detection of fall risk are major issues in preventive gerontology. A simple tool frequently used in daily life, a bathroom scale (balance quality tester: BQT), was modified to obtain information on the balance of 84 outpatients consulting at a geriatric clinic. The results computed from the BQT were compared to the values of three geriatric tests that are widely used either to detect a fall risk or frailty (timed get up and go: TUG; 10 m walking speed: WS; walking time: WT; one-leg stand: OS). The BQT calculates four parameters that are then scored and weighted, thus creating an overall indicator of balance quality. Raw data, partial scores and the global score were compared with the results of the three geriatric tests. The WT values had the highest correlation with BQT raw data (r = 0.55), while TUG (r = 0.53) and WS (r = 0.56) had the highest correlation with BQT partial scores. ROC curves for OS cut-off values (4 and 5 s) were produced, with the best results obtained for a 5 s cut-off, both with the partial scores combined using Fisher's combination (specificity 85 %: <0.11, sensitivity 85 %: >0.48), and with the empirical score (specificity 85 %: <7, sensitivity 85 %: >8). A BQT empirical score of less than seven can detect fall risk in a community dwelling population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus