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Characterization of Newcastle disease virus isolates obtained from outbreak cases in commercial chickens and wild pigeons in Ethiopia.

Damena D, Fusaro A, Sombo M, Belaineh R, Heidari A, Kebede A, Kidane M, Chaka H - Springerplus (2016)

Bottom Line: The similarity between the viruses obtained from chickens and those obtained from pigeons ranged from 82.5 to 85.6 %.This suggests that different sub genotypes of genotype VI are circulating in chicken and wild pigeon population in Ethiopia.This warrants further study to understand the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of NDV in Ethiopia and as well highlights the importance of continuous surveillances both in wild birds and domestic poultry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Animal Health Diagnostic and Investigation Center, P.O. Box 04, Sebeta, Ethiopia.

ABSTRACT
Newcastle disease (ND), caused by virulent avian paramyxovirus type 1, is one of the most important diseases responsible for devastating outbreaks in poultry flocks in Ethiopia. However, the information about genetic characteristics of the Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) circulating in commercial chickens and wild birds is scarce. In this study, we characterized isolates obtained from ND suspected outbreaks during 2012-2014 from poultry farms (n = 8) and wild pigeons (n = 4). The NDVs isolated from pathological specimens, through inoculation in embryonated chicken eggs, were characterized biologically by conventional intracerebral pathogenicity indices (ICPI), and genetically on the basis of Phylogenic analysis of partial F-gene sequences (260 bp) encompassing the cleavage site. The ICPI values of isolates from chickens ranged from 0.9 to 1.8; whereas, the ICPI of pigeon isolates was 1.4. All isolates contained multiple basic amino acids at the deduced cleavage site of fusion protein, which is a typical feature of virulent viruses. Phylogenic analysis of the partial cleavage site of F-gene (260 bp) indicated that all the sequences of viruses obtained from pigeons were identical and clustered within the genotype VIh while the sequences of viruses obtained from chickens were clustered together within the genotype VIf. The similarity between the viruses obtained from chickens and those obtained from pigeons ranged from 82.5 to 85.6 %. This suggests that different sub genotypes of genotype VI are circulating in chicken and wild pigeon population in Ethiopia. This warrants further study to understand the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of NDV in Ethiopia and as well highlights the importance of continuous surveillances both in wild birds and domestic poultry.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of outbreak areas where samples were collected
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Fig1: Location of outbreak areas where samples were collected

Mentions: Between 2012 and 2014, a total of four suspected ND outbreaks in poultry farms and one outbreak in wild pigeons were investigated. Moribund birds or tissue samples of dead birds collected from suspected outbreaks were submitted to the National Animal Health Diagnostic Center (NAHDIC), Ethiopia. The affected farms were small scale poultry farms in Nekemte, Addis Ababa (Nefas silk), Sodo and Kombolcha districts (Fig. 1). The pigeon samples were collected from a suspected ND outbreak in wild pigeons around Lake Ziway. A total of eight isolates (two from each farm) obtained from chickens and four isolates obtained from four pigeons were characterized.Fig. 1


Characterization of Newcastle disease virus isolates obtained from outbreak cases in commercial chickens and wild pigeons in Ethiopia.

Damena D, Fusaro A, Sombo M, Belaineh R, Heidari A, Kebede A, Kidane M, Chaka H - Springerplus (2016)

Location of outbreak areas where samples were collected
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835400&req=5

Fig1: Location of outbreak areas where samples were collected
Mentions: Between 2012 and 2014, a total of four suspected ND outbreaks in poultry farms and one outbreak in wild pigeons were investigated. Moribund birds or tissue samples of dead birds collected from suspected outbreaks were submitted to the National Animal Health Diagnostic Center (NAHDIC), Ethiopia. The affected farms were small scale poultry farms in Nekemte, Addis Ababa (Nefas silk), Sodo and Kombolcha districts (Fig. 1). The pigeon samples were collected from a suspected ND outbreak in wild pigeons around Lake Ziway. A total of eight isolates (two from each farm) obtained from chickens and four isolates obtained from four pigeons were characterized.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The similarity between the viruses obtained from chickens and those obtained from pigeons ranged from 82.5 to 85.6 %.This suggests that different sub genotypes of genotype VI are circulating in chicken and wild pigeon population in Ethiopia.This warrants further study to understand the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of NDV in Ethiopia and as well highlights the importance of continuous surveillances both in wild birds and domestic poultry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Animal Health Diagnostic and Investigation Center, P.O. Box 04, Sebeta, Ethiopia.

ABSTRACT
Newcastle disease (ND), caused by virulent avian paramyxovirus type 1, is one of the most important diseases responsible for devastating outbreaks in poultry flocks in Ethiopia. However, the information about genetic characteristics of the Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) circulating in commercial chickens and wild birds is scarce. In this study, we characterized isolates obtained from ND suspected outbreaks during 2012-2014 from poultry farms (n = 8) and wild pigeons (n = 4). The NDVs isolated from pathological specimens, through inoculation in embryonated chicken eggs, were characterized biologically by conventional intracerebral pathogenicity indices (ICPI), and genetically on the basis of Phylogenic analysis of partial F-gene sequences (260 bp) encompassing the cleavage site. The ICPI values of isolates from chickens ranged from 0.9 to 1.8; whereas, the ICPI of pigeon isolates was 1.4. All isolates contained multiple basic amino acids at the deduced cleavage site of fusion protein, which is a typical feature of virulent viruses. Phylogenic analysis of the partial cleavage site of F-gene (260 bp) indicated that all the sequences of viruses obtained from pigeons were identical and clustered within the genotype VIh while the sequences of viruses obtained from chickens were clustered together within the genotype VIf. The similarity between the viruses obtained from chickens and those obtained from pigeons ranged from 82.5 to 85.6 %. This suggests that different sub genotypes of genotype VI are circulating in chicken and wild pigeon population in Ethiopia. This warrants further study to understand the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of NDV in Ethiopia and as well highlights the importance of continuous surveillances both in wild birds and domestic poultry.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus