Limits...
Assessing the geographic scale of genetic population management with microsatellites and introns in the clam Ruditapes decussatus.

Arias-Pérez A, Cordero D, Borrell Y, Sánchez JA, Blanco G, Freire R, Insua A, Saavedra C - Ecol Evol (2016)

Bottom Line: Microsatellites confirmed the Atlantic and West Mediterranean races detected with introns and showed that genetic variability was higher in Mediterranean than in Atlantic populations.Both marker types showed that genetic differentiation of Atlantic populations was low and indicated that populations could be managed at the regional level in the case of Cantabrian and Gulf of Cadiz areas, but not in the case of Rias Baixas and the Mediterranean.This study shows the interest of including different types of markers in studies of genetic population structure of marine organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Bioloxía Celular e Molecular Universidade da Coruña A Zapateira s/n 15071 A Coruña Spain.

ABSTRACT
The clam Ruditapes decussatus is commercially important in southwestern Europe, suffering from population decline and hybridization with exotic Manila clam (R. philippinarum). Previous studies with intronic markers showed a genetic subdivision of the species in three races (Atlantic, West Mediterranean, and Adriatic-Aegean). However, detailed population genetic studies to help management of the main production areas in the southwest of Europe are missing. We have analyzed eight Atlantic and two Mediterranean populations from the Spanish coasts using 14 microsatellites and six intronic markers. Microsatellites confirmed the Atlantic and West Mediterranean races detected with introns and showed that genetic variability was higher in Mediterranean than in Atlantic populations. Both marker types showed that genetic differentiation of Atlantic populations was low and indicated that populations could be managed at the regional level in the case of Cantabrian and Gulf of Cadiz areas, but not in the case of Rias Baixas and the Mediterranean. This study shows the interest of including different types of markers in studies of genetic population structure of marine organisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Allelic contributions to the differentiation of the clusters inferred by the Bayesian clustering analysis for K = 4, for introns and microsatellites. Each allele is represented with a color line. Intersections with axes show the differences in allele frequencies between clusters for each cluster pair. Biallelic intron markers are named by its locus name as both alleles contribute the same to differentiation of clusters. Due to the intense allele pattern superposition, only the nine microsatellite alleles showing the most conspicuous patterns have been named in the legend.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835341&req=5

ece32052-fig-0005: Allelic contributions to the differentiation of the clusters inferred by the Bayesian clustering analysis for K = 4, for introns and microsatellites. Each allele is represented with a color line. Intersections with axes show the differences in allele frequencies between clusters for each cluster pair. Biallelic intron markers are named by its locus name as both alleles contribute the same to differentiation of clusters. Due to the intense allele pattern superposition, only the nine microsatellite alleles showing the most conspicuous patterns have been named in the legend.

Mentions: The contributions of the alleles of each intron marker to the differences among clusters are shown in the radar plot of Figure 5 for K = 4, which is the most complex structure. Several alleles at loci Ech and Tbp, especially Ech‐2 and Tbp‐2, displayed strong differences in frequency between cluster 2, the main cluster found in the Mediterranean samples, and the remaining clusters. On the other hand, the locus Trdmt showed the most important contribution to differentiate clusters 1 and 2 from clusters 3 and 4, and therefore to distinguish the groups of populations of Rias Baixas and Gulf of Cadiz, which are characterized by different frequencies of those two cluster groups between them and with respect to the Cantabrian and Mediterranean populations. Allele Srp54‐1 showed a similar pattern, although less marked.


Assessing the geographic scale of genetic population management with microsatellites and introns in the clam Ruditapes decussatus.

Arias-Pérez A, Cordero D, Borrell Y, Sánchez JA, Blanco G, Freire R, Insua A, Saavedra C - Ecol Evol (2016)

Allelic contributions to the differentiation of the clusters inferred by the Bayesian clustering analysis for K = 4, for introns and microsatellites. Each allele is represented with a color line. Intersections with axes show the differences in allele frequencies between clusters for each cluster pair. Biallelic intron markers are named by its locus name as both alleles contribute the same to differentiation of clusters. Due to the intense allele pattern superposition, only the nine microsatellite alleles showing the most conspicuous patterns have been named in the legend.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835341&req=5

ece32052-fig-0005: Allelic contributions to the differentiation of the clusters inferred by the Bayesian clustering analysis for K = 4, for introns and microsatellites. Each allele is represented with a color line. Intersections with axes show the differences in allele frequencies between clusters for each cluster pair. Biallelic intron markers are named by its locus name as both alleles contribute the same to differentiation of clusters. Due to the intense allele pattern superposition, only the nine microsatellite alleles showing the most conspicuous patterns have been named in the legend.
Mentions: The contributions of the alleles of each intron marker to the differences among clusters are shown in the radar plot of Figure 5 for K = 4, which is the most complex structure. Several alleles at loci Ech and Tbp, especially Ech‐2 and Tbp‐2, displayed strong differences in frequency between cluster 2, the main cluster found in the Mediterranean samples, and the remaining clusters. On the other hand, the locus Trdmt showed the most important contribution to differentiate clusters 1 and 2 from clusters 3 and 4, and therefore to distinguish the groups of populations of Rias Baixas and Gulf of Cadiz, which are characterized by different frequencies of those two cluster groups between them and with respect to the Cantabrian and Mediterranean populations. Allele Srp54‐1 showed a similar pattern, although less marked.

Bottom Line: Microsatellites confirmed the Atlantic and West Mediterranean races detected with introns and showed that genetic variability was higher in Mediterranean than in Atlantic populations.Both marker types showed that genetic differentiation of Atlantic populations was low and indicated that populations could be managed at the regional level in the case of Cantabrian and Gulf of Cadiz areas, but not in the case of Rias Baixas and the Mediterranean.This study shows the interest of including different types of markers in studies of genetic population structure of marine organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Bioloxía Celular e Molecular Universidade da Coruña A Zapateira s/n 15071 A Coruña Spain.

ABSTRACT
The clam Ruditapes decussatus is commercially important in southwestern Europe, suffering from population decline and hybridization with exotic Manila clam (R. philippinarum). Previous studies with intronic markers showed a genetic subdivision of the species in three races (Atlantic, West Mediterranean, and Adriatic-Aegean). However, detailed population genetic studies to help management of the main production areas in the southwest of Europe are missing. We have analyzed eight Atlantic and two Mediterranean populations from the Spanish coasts using 14 microsatellites and six intronic markers. Microsatellites confirmed the Atlantic and West Mediterranean races detected with introns and showed that genetic variability was higher in Mediterranean than in Atlantic populations. Both marker types showed that genetic differentiation of Atlantic populations was low and indicated that populations could be managed at the regional level in the case of Cantabrian and Gulf of Cadiz areas, but not in the case of Rias Baixas and the Mediterranean. This study shows the interest of including different types of markers in studies of genetic population structure of marine organisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus