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The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans.

Alsalman O, Ost J, Vanspauwen R, Blaivie C, De Ridder D, Vanneste S - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness.A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex.This suggests that these patients have a neural signature or trait that makes them prone to developing chronic balance problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lab for Clinical & Integrative Neuroscience, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic symptoms of vertigo episodes. This suggests that these patients have a neural signature or trait that makes them prone to developing chronic balance problems.

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A whole brain group comparison between patients with chronic vestibular symptoms and healthy subjects.A comparison of source analyzed resting state brain activity between patients with chronic symptoms of vertigo and healthy subjects revealed: (A) a significant increase (in red) of alpha2 activity in the posterior cingulate cortex extending into the parahippocampal area, precuneus, and cuneus regions, (B) a decrease (in blue) for beta3, activity predominant in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex,as well as the left anterior midtemporal area and the dorsal attention network which incorporates regions of the superior parietal area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). As for gamma, figure (C) shows decreased (in blue) for gamma frequency band, mostly present in the pre-supplementary motor area extending into the frontal eye fields as well as the precuneus.
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pone.0152309.g001: A whole brain group comparison between patients with chronic vestibular symptoms and healthy subjects.A comparison of source analyzed resting state brain activity between patients with chronic symptoms of vertigo and healthy subjects revealed: (A) a significant increase (in red) of alpha2 activity in the posterior cingulate cortex extending into the parahippocampal area, precuneus, and cuneus regions, (B) a decrease (in blue) for beta3, activity predominant in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex,as well as the left anterior midtemporal area and the dorsal attention network which incorporates regions of the superior parietal area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). As for gamma, figure (C) shows decreased (in blue) for gamma frequency band, mostly present in the pre-supplementary motor area extending into the frontal eye fields as well as the precuneus.

Mentions: A comparison between patients with chronic symptom of vertigo and healthy subjects revealed a significant increase for the alpha2 frequency band (F = .28, p < .05) and reduced activity for the beta3 (F = -.20, p < .05) and gamma (F = -.55, p < .01) frequency bands. For alpha2, increased activity is found in the posterior cingulate cortex extending into the parahippocampal area, precuneus, and cuneus (Fig 1A). For beta3 decreased activity is localized predominantly in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, and the medial orbitofrontal cortex, however, there is also decreased beta3 activity in the left anterior midtemporal area and the dorsal attention network (superior parietal area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) (Fig 1B). For the gamma frequency band, decreased activity is apparent in the pre-supplementary motor area extending into the frontal eye fields as well as the precuneus (Fig 1C). No significant results were obtained for the delta, theta, alpha1, beta1, and beta2 frequency bands.


The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans.

Alsalman O, Ost J, Vanspauwen R, Blaivie C, De Ridder D, Vanneste S - PLoS ONE (2016)

A whole brain group comparison between patients with chronic vestibular symptoms and healthy subjects.A comparison of source analyzed resting state brain activity between patients with chronic symptoms of vertigo and healthy subjects revealed: (A) a significant increase (in red) of alpha2 activity in the posterior cingulate cortex extending into the parahippocampal area, precuneus, and cuneus regions, (B) a decrease (in blue) for beta3, activity predominant in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex,as well as the left anterior midtemporal area and the dorsal attention network which incorporates regions of the superior parietal area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). As for gamma, figure (C) shows decreased (in blue) for gamma frequency band, mostly present in the pre-supplementary motor area extending into the frontal eye fields as well as the precuneus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835222&req=5

pone.0152309.g001: A whole brain group comparison between patients with chronic vestibular symptoms and healthy subjects.A comparison of source analyzed resting state brain activity between patients with chronic symptoms of vertigo and healthy subjects revealed: (A) a significant increase (in red) of alpha2 activity in the posterior cingulate cortex extending into the parahippocampal area, precuneus, and cuneus regions, (B) a decrease (in blue) for beta3, activity predominant in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex,as well as the left anterior midtemporal area and the dorsal attention network which incorporates regions of the superior parietal area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). As for gamma, figure (C) shows decreased (in blue) for gamma frequency band, mostly present in the pre-supplementary motor area extending into the frontal eye fields as well as the precuneus.
Mentions: A comparison between patients with chronic symptom of vertigo and healthy subjects revealed a significant increase for the alpha2 frequency band (F = .28, p < .05) and reduced activity for the beta3 (F = -.20, p < .05) and gamma (F = -.55, p < .01) frequency bands. For alpha2, increased activity is found in the posterior cingulate cortex extending into the parahippocampal area, precuneus, and cuneus (Fig 1A). For beta3 decreased activity is localized predominantly in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, and the medial orbitofrontal cortex, however, there is also decreased beta3 activity in the left anterior midtemporal area and the dorsal attention network (superior parietal area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) (Fig 1B). For the gamma frequency band, decreased activity is apparent in the pre-supplementary motor area extending into the frontal eye fields as well as the precuneus (Fig 1C). No significant results were obtained for the delta, theta, alpha1, beta1, and beta2 frequency bands.

Bottom Line: Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness.A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex.This suggests that these patients have a neural signature or trait that makes them prone to developing chronic balance problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lab for Clinical & Integrative Neuroscience, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic symptoms of vertigo episodes. This suggests that these patients have a neural signature or trait that makes them prone to developing chronic balance problems.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus