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Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania.

Gaines KP, Stanley JW, Meinzer FC, McCulloh KA, Woodruff DR, Chen W, Adams TS, Lin H, Eissenstat DM - Tree Physiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on multiple lines of evidence, including stable isotope natural abundance, sap flux and soil moisture depletion patterns with depth, the majority of water uptake during the dry part of the growing season occurred, on average, at less than ∼60 cm soil depth throughout the catchment.While there were some trends in depth of water uptake related to genus, tree size and soil depth, water uptake was more uniformly shallow than we expected.Our results suggest that these types of forests may rely considerably on water sources that are quite shallow, even in the drier parts of the growing season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Tree xylem water and potential source water δ2H and δ18O compositions with an amount-weighted LMWL, including average groundwater, average mobile soil water, average bulk soil water by depth and amount-weighted seasonal precipitation. Error bars represent mean ± standard error. Equation of weighted LMWL: y = 8.4x + 15.8.
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TPV113F5: Tree xylem water and potential source water δ2H and δ18O compositions with an amount-weighted LMWL, including average groundwater, average mobile soil water, average bulk soil water by depth and amount-weighted seasonal precipitation. Error bars represent mean ± standard error. Equation of weighted LMWL: y = 8.4x + 15.8.

Mentions: Precipitation δ18O and δ2H signatures showed a large amount of variation and strong seasonal patterns, with compositions more enriched in heavy isotopes in spring and summer than in fall and winter (Figure 5). The average isotopic composition for the fall season was strongly affected by a large snowstorm in October 2011 that had isotopic compositions very depleted in heavy isotopes. This resulted in an average seasonal value for fall that was more typical of winter precipitation.Figure 5.


Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania.

Gaines KP, Stanley JW, Meinzer FC, McCulloh KA, Woodruff DR, Chen W, Adams TS, Lin H, Eissenstat DM - Tree Physiol. (2015)

Tree xylem water and potential source water δ2H and δ18O compositions with an amount-weighted LMWL, including average groundwater, average mobile soil water, average bulk soil water by depth and amount-weighted seasonal precipitation. Error bars represent mean ± standard error. Equation of weighted LMWL: y = 8.4x + 15.8.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835221&req=5

TPV113F5: Tree xylem water and potential source water δ2H and δ18O compositions with an amount-weighted LMWL, including average groundwater, average mobile soil water, average bulk soil water by depth and amount-weighted seasonal precipitation. Error bars represent mean ± standard error. Equation of weighted LMWL: y = 8.4x + 15.8.
Mentions: Precipitation δ18O and δ2H signatures showed a large amount of variation and strong seasonal patterns, with compositions more enriched in heavy isotopes in spring and summer than in fall and winter (Figure 5). The average isotopic composition for the fall season was strongly affected by a large snowstorm in October 2011 that had isotopic compositions very depleted in heavy isotopes. This resulted in an average seasonal value for fall that was more typical of winter precipitation.Figure 5.

Bottom Line: Based on multiple lines of evidence, including stable isotope natural abundance, sap flux and soil moisture depletion patterns with depth, the majority of water uptake during the dry part of the growing season occurred, on average, at less than ∼60 cm soil depth throughout the catchment.While there were some trends in depth of water uptake related to genus, tree size and soil depth, water uptake was more uniformly shallow than we expected.Our results suggest that these types of forests may rely considerably on water sources that are quite shallow, even in the drier parts of the growing season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

No MeSH data available.