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Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania.

Gaines KP, Stanley JW, Meinzer FC, McCulloh KA, Woodruff DR, Chen W, Adams TS, Lin H, Eissenstat DM - Tree Physiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on multiple lines of evidence, including stable isotope natural abundance, sap flux and soil moisture depletion patterns with depth, the majority of water uptake during the dry part of the growing season occurred, on average, at less than ∼60 cm soil depth throughout the catchment.While there were some trends in depth of water uptake related to genus, tree size and soil depth, water uptake was more uniformly shallow than we expected.Our results suggest that these types of forests may rely considerably on water sources that are quite shallow, even in the drier parts of the growing season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Root length density by depth (per unit volume of soil) for ridge, midslope and valley slope positions (cm cm−3). Eighteen cores were collected, six at each slope position, on sites with planar curvature (Figure 1). Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Coring depth for ‘40+’ category was 59 cm (±4 cm) for the ridge sites, 69 cm (±0.8 cm) for the midslope and 62 cm (±2 cm) for the valley sites.
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TPV113F4: Root length density by depth (per unit volume of soil) for ridge, midslope and valley slope positions (cm cm−3). Eighteen cores were collected, six at each slope position, on sites with planar curvature (Figure 1). Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Coring depth for ‘40+’ category was 59 cm (±4 cm) for the ridge sites, 69 cm (±0.8 cm) for the midslope and 62 cm (±2 cm) for the valley sites.

Mentions: Root length density by depth increment on a volume basis (cm cm−3) was highest in the top 10 cm of soil and declined steeply with depth (Figure 4). Total root length per ground surface area did not differ significantly by slope position category (midslope, 56 ± 17 cm cm−2; ridge, 48 ± 11 cm cm−2; valley floor, 35 ± 8 cm cm−2; P = 0.52). On average across slope positions, >84% of total root length to depth of refusal was located in the top 40 cm of soil, with over 50% in the top 10 cm.Figure 4.


Reliance on shallow soil water in a mixed-hardwood forest in central Pennsylvania.

Gaines KP, Stanley JW, Meinzer FC, McCulloh KA, Woodruff DR, Chen W, Adams TS, Lin H, Eissenstat DM - Tree Physiol. (2015)

Root length density by depth (per unit volume of soil) for ridge, midslope and valley slope positions (cm cm−3). Eighteen cores were collected, six at each slope position, on sites with planar curvature (Figure 1). Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Coring depth for ‘40+’ category was 59 cm (±4 cm) for the ridge sites, 69 cm (±0.8 cm) for the midslope and 62 cm (±2 cm) for the valley sites.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835221&req=5

TPV113F4: Root length density by depth (per unit volume of soil) for ridge, midslope and valley slope positions (cm cm−3). Eighteen cores were collected, six at each slope position, on sites with planar curvature (Figure 1). Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Coring depth for ‘40+’ category was 59 cm (±4 cm) for the ridge sites, 69 cm (±0.8 cm) for the midslope and 62 cm (±2 cm) for the valley sites.
Mentions: Root length density by depth increment on a volume basis (cm cm−3) was highest in the top 10 cm of soil and declined steeply with depth (Figure 4). Total root length per ground surface area did not differ significantly by slope position category (midslope, 56 ± 17 cm cm−2; ridge, 48 ± 11 cm cm−2; valley floor, 35 ± 8 cm cm−2; P = 0.52). On average across slope positions, >84% of total root length to depth of refusal was located in the top 40 cm of soil, with over 50% in the top 10 cm.Figure 4.

Bottom Line: Based on multiple lines of evidence, including stable isotope natural abundance, sap flux and soil moisture depletion patterns with depth, the majority of water uptake during the dry part of the growing season occurred, on average, at less than ∼60 cm soil depth throughout the catchment.While there were some trends in depth of water uptake related to genus, tree size and soil depth, water uptake was more uniformly shallow than we expected.Our results suggest that these types of forests may rely considerably on water sources that are quite shallow, even in the drier parts of the growing season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

No MeSH data available.