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A Novel Simulation Technician Laboratory Design: Results of a Survey-Based Study.

Ahmed R, Hughes PG, Friedl E, Ortiz Figueroa F, Cepeda Brito JR, Frey J, Birmingham LE, Atkinson SS - Cureus (2016)

Bottom Line: Quantitative methods were utilized to analyze data.Over 90% of technicians (n=65) think that a lab designed explicitly for the training of technicians is novel and beneficial.CONCLUSIONS : A space designed for the training of simulation technicians was considered to be beneficial.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emergency Medicine, Summa Akron City Hospital, Summa Health System.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to elicit feedback from simulation technicians prior to developing the first simulation technician-specific simulation laboratory in Akron, OH.

Background: Simulation technicians serve a vital role in simulation centers within hospitals/health centers around the world. The first simulation technician degree program in the US has been approved in Akron, OH. To satisfy the requirements of this program and to meet the needs of this special audience of learners, a customized simulation lab is essential.

Method: A web-based survey was circulated to simulation technicians prior to completion of the lab for the new program. The survey consisted of questions aimed at identifying structural and functional design elements of a novel simulation center for the training of simulation technicians. Quantitative methods were utilized to analyze data.

Results: Over 90% of technicians (n=65) think that a lab designed explicitly for the training of technicians is novel and beneficial. Approximately 75% of respondents think that the space provided appropriate audiovisual (AV) infrastructure and space to evaluate the ability of technicians to be independent. The respondents think that the lab needed more storage space, visualization space for a large number of students, and more space in the technical/repair area. CONCLUSIONS : A space designed for the training of simulation technicians was considered to be beneficial. This laboratory requires distinct space for technical repair, adequate bench space for the maintenance and repair of simulators, an appropriate AV infrastructure, and space to evaluate the ability of technicians to be independent.

No MeSH data available.


Technical repair training for simulation technician students
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FIG4: Technical repair training for simulation technician students

Mentions: The ability to modify the simulator's vital signs based on the learner's decision-making during a simulation is an essential skill for the technician. However, there is more skill and preparation required for the technician to run a successful simulation. The clinical simulation lab provides an isolated environment to run a full simulation, manage the setup and breakdown of a simulation, and test, run, and troubleshoot the audiovisual components of a simulation. Once the technician is ready for supervised practice or is being tested to determine competency, the Master Instructor will be able to monitor the student’s progress by direct observation, from outside the control room. This is possible by means of direct observation through a one-way mirror from the instructor observation area (Figure 3). The instructor observation area sits in front of a large one-way glass that looks into the control room (“control room looking into a control room”) as well as the simulated clinical space that the technician will be working in. This environment provides the technician-in-training the opportunity to perform with complete autonomy in order to demonstrate their skill set and problem-solving strategies without prompting or assistance from instructors. This distinctive training space allows the Master Instructor to cut power, disconnect Wi-Fi and LAN lines, as well as communicate with standardized confederate actors portraying the role of learners, to create situations that the technician-in-training may not anticipate and will need to troubleshoot (Figure 4).


A Novel Simulation Technician Laboratory Design: Results of a Survey-Based Study.

Ahmed R, Hughes PG, Friedl E, Ortiz Figueroa F, Cepeda Brito JR, Frey J, Birmingham LE, Atkinson SS - Cureus (2016)

Technical repair training for simulation technician students
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835150&req=5

FIG4: Technical repair training for simulation technician students
Mentions: The ability to modify the simulator's vital signs based on the learner's decision-making during a simulation is an essential skill for the technician. However, there is more skill and preparation required for the technician to run a successful simulation. The clinical simulation lab provides an isolated environment to run a full simulation, manage the setup and breakdown of a simulation, and test, run, and troubleshoot the audiovisual components of a simulation. Once the technician is ready for supervised practice or is being tested to determine competency, the Master Instructor will be able to monitor the student’s progress by direct observation, from outside the control room. This is possible by means of direct observation through a one-way mirror from the instructor observation area (Figure 3). The instructor observation area sits in front of a large one-way glass that looks into the control room (“control room looking into a control room”) as well as the simulated clinical space that the technician will be working in. This environment provides the technician-in-training the opportunity to perform with complete autonomy in order to demonstrate their skill set and problem-solving strategies without prompting or assistance from instructors. This distinctive training space allows the Master Instructor to cut power, disconnect Wi-Fi and LAN lines, as well as communicate with standardized confederate actors portraying the role of learners, to create situations that the technician-in-training may not anticipate and will need to troubleshoot (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Quantitative methods were utilized to analyze data.Over 90% of technicians (n=65) think that a lab designed explicitly for the training of technicians is novel and beneficial.CONCLUSIONS : A space designed for the training of simulation technicians was considered to be beneficial.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emergency Medicine, Summa Akron City Hospital, Summa Health System.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to elicit feedback from simulation technicians prior to developing the first simulation technician-specific simulation laboratory in Akron, OH.

Background: Simulation technicians serve a vital role in simulation centers within hospitals/health centers around the world. The first simulation technician degree program in the US has been approved in Akron, OH. To satisfy the requirements of this program and to meet the needs of this special audience of learners, a customized simulation lab is essential.

Method: A web-based survey was circulated to simulation technicians prior to completion of the lab for the new program. The survey consisted of questions aimed at identifying structural and functional design elements of a novel simulation center for the training of simulation technicians. Quantitative methods were utilized to analyze data.

Results: Over 90% of technicians (n=65) think that a lab designed explicitly for the training of technicians is novel and beneficial. Approximately 75% of respondents think that the space provided appropriate audiovisual (AV) infrastructure and space to evaluate the ability of technicians to be independent. The respondents think that the lab needed more storage space, visualization space for a large number of students, and more space in the technical/repair area. CONCLUSIONS : A space designed for the training of simulation technicians was considered to be beneficial. This laboratory requires distinct space for technical repair, adequate bench space for the maintenance and repair of simulators, an appropriate AV infrastructure, and space to evaluate the ability of technicians to be independent.

No MeSH data available.