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The influence of childhood abuse, adult life events, and affective temperaments on the well-being of the general, nonclinical adult population.

Kanai Y, Takaesu Y, Nakai Y, Ichiki M, Sato M, Matsumoto Y, Ishikawa J, Ono Y, Murakoshi A, Tanabe H, Kusumi I, Inoue T - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2016)

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect) and ill-being (negative affect).The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects.An important "mediator" role of affective temperaments in the effect of childhood abuse on well-being was suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Palliative Medicine, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect) and ill-being (negative affect). We hypothesized that childhood abuse, affective temperaments, and adult life events interact with one another and influence positive and negative affects in the general adult population and tested this hypothesis using structural equation modeling.

Methods: A total of 415 participants from the general, nonclinical adult population were studied using the following self-administered questionnaires: the Subjective Well-Being Inventory (SUBI); Life Experiences Survey (LES); Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A); and the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS). The data were analyzed with single and multiple regression analyses and structural equation modeling (Mplus).

Results: Childhood abuse indirectly predicted the worsening of positive and negative affects through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments as measured by the TEMPS-A in the structural equation model. The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects.

Limitations: The subjects of this study were nonclinical volunteers. The findings might not be generalizable to psychiatric patients.

Conclusion: This study demonstrated that childhood abuse, particularly neglect, indirectly worsened the well-being of individuals through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable affective temperaments. An important "mediator" role of affective temperaments in the effect of childhood abuse on well-being was suggested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The results of the covariance structure analysis in the structural equation model, using the childhood abuse (CATS), affective temperaments (TEMPS-A), adult life events (LES), positive affect (well-being) (A) and negative affect (ill-being) (B) (SUBI) scores from 415 subjects from the general, nonclinical adult population.Notes: The rectangles indicate the observed variables and the ovals indicate the latent variables. The arrows with solid lines represent the statistically significant paths, and the broken lines show the nonsignificant paths. The numbers beside the arrows show the standardized path coefficients (minimum −1, maximum 1). *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: CATS, Child Abuse and Trauma Scale; TEMPS-A, Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire; CAI, cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments; LES, Life Experiences Survey; SUBI, Subjective Well-Being Inventory; RMSEA, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation; CFI, Comparative Fit Index; TLI, Tucker–Lewis Index.
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f1-ndt-12-823: The results of the covariance structure analysis in the structural equation model, using the childhood abuse (CATS), affective temperaments (TEMPS-A), adult life events (LES), positive affect (well-being) (A) and negative affect (ill-being) (B) (SUBI) scores from 415 subjects from the general, nonclinical adult population.Notes: The rectangles indicate the observed variables and the ovals indicate the latent variables. The arrows with solid lines represent the statistically significant paths, and the broken lines show the nonsignificant paths. The numbers beside the arrows show the standardized path coefficients (minimum −1, maximum 1). *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: CATS, Child Abuse and Trauma Scale; TEMPS-A, Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire; CAI, cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments; LES, Life Experiences Survey; SUBI, Subjective Well-Being Inventory; RMSEA, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation; CFI, Comparative Fit Index; TLI, Tucker–Lewis Index.

Mentions: To examine the complicated association between the CATS, TEMPS-A, LES, and SUBI scores, we built a structural equation model based on the results of the aforementioned univariate analyses and multiple regression analyses (Figure 1A and B). The results of the path coefficients calculated by Mplus are shown in Figure 1A and B.


The influence of childhood abuse, adult life events, and affective temperaments on the well-being of the general, nonclinical adult population.

Kanai Y, Takaesu Y, Nakai Y, Ichiki M, Sato M, Matsumoto Y, Ishikawa J, Ono Y, Murakoshi A, Tanabe H, Kusumi I, Inoue T - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2016)

The results of the covariance structure analysis in the structural equation model, using the childhood abuse (CATS), affective temperaments (TEMPS-A), adult life events (LES), positive affect (well-being) (A) and negative affect (ill-being) (B) (SUBI) scores from 415 subjects from the general, nonclinical adult population.Notes: The rectangles indicate the observed variables and the ovals indicate the latent variables. The arrows with solid lines represent the statistically significant paths, and the broken lines show the nonsignificant paths. The numbers beside the arrows show the standardized path coefficients (minimum −1, maximum 1). *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: CATS, Child Abuse and Trauma Scale; TEMPS-A, Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire; CAI, cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments; LES, Life Experiences Survey; SUBI, Subjective Well-Being Inventory; RMSEA, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation; CFI, Comparative Fit Index; TLI, Tucker–Lewis Index.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835123&req=5

f1-ndt-12-823: The results of the covariance structure analysis in the structural equation model, using the childhood abuse (CATS), affective temperaments (TEMPS-A), adult life events (LES), positive affect (well-being) (A) and negative affect (ill-being) (B) (SUBI) scores from 415 subjects from the general, nonclinical adult population.Notes: The rectangles indicate the observed variables and the ovals indicate the latent variables. The arrows with solid lines represent the statistically significant paths, and the broken lines show the nonsignificant paths. The numbers beside the arrows show the standardized path coefficients (minimum −1, maximum 1). *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: CATS, Child Abuse and Trauma Scale; TEMPS-A, Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire; CAI, cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments; LES, Life Experiences Survey; SUBI, Subjective Well-Being Inventory; RMSEA, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation; CFI, Comparative Fit Index; TLI, Tucker–Lewis Index.
Mentions: To examine the complicated association between the CATS, TEMPS-A, LES, and SUBI scores, we built a structural equation model based on the results of the aforementioned univariate analyses and multiple regression analyses (Figure 1A and B). The results of the path coefficients calculated by Mplus are shown in Figure 1A and B.

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect) and ill-being (negative affect).The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects.An important "mediator" role of affective temperaments in the effect of childhood abuse on well-being was suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Palliative Medicine, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect) and ill-being (negative affect). We hypothesized that childhood abuse, affective temperaments, and adult life events interact with one another and influence positive and negative affects in the general adult population and tested this hypothesis using structural equation modeling.

Methods: A total of 415 participants from the general, nonclinical adult population were studied using the following self-administered questionnaires: the Subjective Well-Being Inventory (SUBI); Life Experiences Survey (LES); Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A); and the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS). The data were analyzed with single and multiple regression analyses and structural equation modeling (Mplus).

Results: Childhood abuse indirectly predicted the worsening of positive and negative affects through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments as measured by the TEMPS-A in the structural equation model. The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects.

Limitations: The subjects of this study were nonclinical volunteers. The findings might not be generalizable to psychiatric patients.

Conclusion: This study demonstrated that childhood abuse, particularly neglect, indirectly worsened the well-being of individuals through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable affective temperaments. An important "mediator" role of affective temperaments in the effect of childhood abuse on well-being was suggested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus