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Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans.

Rast TJ, Kullas AL, Southern PJ, Davis DA - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals.However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage.Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of C. albicans mutations on host transcriptional responses.RT-PCR for IL-8, SERPIN E1 (SER E1), IL-6, IL1⍺, DUSP1, IL-24, and DUSP6 transcription, expressed in relative ng (y-axis). cDNA derived from mRNA purified from FaDu epithelial cell monolayers infected with wild-type C. albicans (■), rim101Δ/Δ (▲), mutant cells, efg1 cph1Δ/Δ (×) mutant cells, S. cerevisiae (*), or non-infected (◆) at defined time points (x-axis). A single time course experiment is shown, but analogous results were obtained in two replicate experiments.
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pone.0153165.g003: Effect of C. albicans mutations on host transcriptional responses.RT-PCR for IL-8, SERPIN E1 (SER E1), IL-6, IL1⍺, DUSP1, IL-24, and DUSP6 transcription, expressed in relative ng (y-axis). cDNA derived from mRNA purified from FaDu epithelial cell monolayers infected with wild-type C. albicans (■), rim101Δ/Δ (▲), mutant cells, efg1 cph1Δ/Δ (×) mutant cells, S. cerevisiae (*), or non-infected (◆) at defined time points (x-axis). A single time course experiment is shown, but analogous results were obtained in two replicate experiments.

Mentions: IL-8 and SERPIN E1 were induced 3 hours post-infection with wild-type C. albicans and reached a maximal level of induction 8 hours post-infection (Fig 3). Similar results were observed when epithelial cells were infected with the rim101Δ/Δ mutant. However, when epithelial cells were exposed to a high dose of the efg1Δ/Δ cph1Δ/Δ mutant, IL-8 and SERPIN E1 expression were induced ~14 hours post-infection and only reached ~50% of the level observed with exposure to either the wild-type or rim101Δ/Δ strains. S. cerevisiae did not induce IL-8 or SERPIN E1 expression, even after 32 hours of co-culture.


Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans.

Rast TJ, Kullas AL, Southern PJ, Davis DA - PLoS ONE (2016)

Effect of C. albicans mutations on host transcriptional responses.RT-PCR for IL-8, SERPIN E1 (SER E1), IL-6, IL1⍺, DUSP1, IL-24, and DUSP6 transcription, expressed in relative ng (y-axis). cDNA derived from mRNA purified from FaDu epithelial cell monolayers infected with wild-type C. albicans (■), rim101Δ/Δ (▲), mutant cells, efg1 cph1Δ/Δ (×) mutant cells, S. cerevisiae (*), or non-infected (◆) at defined time points (x-axis). A single time course experiment is shown, but analogous results were obtained in two replicate experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835109&req=5

pone.0153165.g003: Effect of C. albicans mutations on host transcriptional responses.RT-PCR for IL-8, SERPIN E1 (SER E1), IL-6, IL1⍺, DUSP1, IL-24, and DUSP6 transcription, expressed in relative ng (y-axis). cDNA derived from mRNA purified from FaDu epithelial cell monolayers infected with wild-type C. albicans (■), rim101Δ/Δ (▲), mutant cells, efg1 cph1Δ/Δ (×) mutant cells, S. cerevisiae (*), or non-infected (◆) at defined time points (x-axis). A single time course experiment is shown, but analogous results were obtained in two replicate experiments.
Mentions: IL-8 and SERPIN E1 were induced 3 hours post-infection with wild-type C. albicans and reached a maximal level of induction 8 hours post-infection (Fig 3). Similar results were observed when epithelial cells were infected with the rim101Δ/Δ mutant. However, when epithelial cells were exposed to a high dose of the efg1Δ/Δ cph1Δ/Δ mutant, IL-8 and SERPIN E1 expression were induced ~14 hours post-infection and only reached ~50% of the level observed with exposure to either the wild-type or rim101Δ/Δ strains. S. cerevisiae did not induce IL-8 or SERPIN E1 expression, even after 32 hours of co-culture.

Bottom Line: The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals.However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage.Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus