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Migration and DNA methylation: a comparison of methylation patterns in type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes between indians and europeans.

Elliott HR, Walia GK, Duggirala A, Groom A, Reddy SU, Chandak GR, Gupta V, Laakso M, Dekker JM - J Diabetes Res Clin Metab (2013)

Bottom Line: However, these observations were not linked to local variation in DNA methylation levels.No differences in methylation patterns were observed in urban-dwelling migrants compared to their non-migrant rural-dwelling siblings in India.These differences may be attributed to genetic and/or region-specific environmental factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Type 2 diabetes is a global problem that is increasingly prevalent in low and middle income countries including India, and is partly attributed to increased urbanisation. Genotype clearly plays a role in type 2 diabetes susceptibility. However, the role of DNA methylation and its interaction with genotype and metabolic measures is poorly understood. This study aimed to establish whether methylation patterns of type 2 diabetes genes differ between distinct Indian and European populations and/or change following rural to urban migration in India.

Methods: Quantitative DNA methylation analysis in Indians and Europeans using Sequenom(®) EpiTYPER(®) technology was undertaken in three genes: ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11. Metabolic measures and genotype data were also analysed.

Results: Consistent differences in DNA methylation patterns were observed between Indian and European populations in ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11. Associations were demonstrated between FTO rs9939609 and BMI and between ADCY5rs17295401 and HDL levels in Europeans. However, these observations were not linked to local variation in DNA methylation levels. No differences in methylation patterns were observed in urban-dwelling migrants compared to their non-migrant rural-dwelling siblings in India.

Conclusions: Analysis of DNA methylation at three type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci highlighted geographical and ethnic differences in methylation patterns. These differences may be attributed to genetic and/or region-specific environmental factors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box plot showing ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11 methylation by place. Boxes show the median and interquartile range, whiskers represent the minimum and maximum. Closed circles are outliers.
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Figure 2: Box plot showing ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11 methylation by place. Boxes show the median and interquartile range, whiskers represent the minimum and maximum. Closed circles are outliers.

Mentions: Marked differences in methylation levels were noted between the geographic locations. ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11 methylation was 6.3, 2.7 and 1.5% lower, respectively, in the European group compared to the Urban Indian group (Figure 2, see Table 1 for methylation values and Table 3 for test statistics). FTO methylation was 0.5% and 0.7% higher in rural and urban Lucknow dwellers compared to respective Hyderabad dwellers. Conversely, KCNJ11 methylation was 0.5% lower in Lucknow than Hyderabad, in both rural and urban dwelling comparisons. In ADCY5, methylation differences between Lucknow and Hyderabad were less marked. No robust regional differences in RISC methylation were identified between study centres (ADCY5, p= 0.362; FTO, p= 0.946; KCNJ11, p= 0.505). Furthermore, no differences in methylation were observed in RISC when Northern dwelling Europeans were compared to Southern dwelling Europeans (defined as living above or below 50° latitude) (ADCY5, p= 0.958 ; FTO, p= 0.745; KCNJ11, p= 0.637 ).


Migration and DNA methylation: a comparison of methylation patterns in type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes between indians and europeans.

Elliott HR, Walia GK, Duggirala A, Groom A, Reddy SU, Chandak GR, Gupta V, Laakso M, Dekker JM - J Diabetes Res Clin Metab (2013)

Box plot showing ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11 methylation by place. Boxes show the median and interquartile range, whiskers represent the minimum and maximum. Closed circles are outliers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835020&req=5

Figure 2: Box plot showing ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11 methylation by place. Boxes show the median and interquartile range, whiskers represent the minimum and maximum. Closed circles are outliers.
Mentions: Marked differences in methylation levels were noted between the geographic locations. ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11 methylation was 6.3, 2.7 and 1.5% lower, respectively, in the European group compared to the Urban Indian group (Figure 2, see Table 1 for methylation values and Table 3 for test statistics). FTO methylation was 0.5% and 0.7% higher in rural and urban Lucknow dwellers compared to respective Hyderabad dwellers. Conversely, KCNJ11 methylation was 0.5% lower in Lucknow than Hyderabad, in both rural and urban dwelling comparisons. In ADCY5, methylation differences between Lucknow and Hyderabad were less marked. No robust regional differences in RISC methylation were identified between study centres (ADCY5, p= 0.362; FTO, p= 0.946; KCNJ11, p= 0.505). Furthermore, no differences in methylation were observed in RISC when Northern dwelling Europeans were compared to Southern dwelling Europeans (defined as living above or below 50° latitude) (ADCY5, p= 0.958 ; FTO, p= 0.745; KCNJ11, p= 0.637 ).

Bottom Line: However, these observations were not linked to local variation in DNA methylation levels.No differences in methylation patterns were observed in urban-dwelling migrants compared to their non-migrant rural-dwelling siblings in India.These differences may be attributed to genetic and/or region-specific environmental factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Type 2 diabetes is a global problem that is increasingly prevalent in low and middle income countries including India, and is partly attributed to increased urbanisation. Genotype clearly plays a role in type 2 diabetes susceptibility. However, the role of DNA methylation and its interaction with genotype and metabolic measures is poorly understood. This study aimed to establish whether methylation patterns of type 2 diabetes genes differ between distinct Indian and European populations and/or change following rural to urban migration in India.

Methods: Quantitative DNA methylation analysis in Indians and Europeans using Sequenom(®) EpiTYPER(®) technology was undertaken in three genes: ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11. Metabolic measures and genotype data were also analysed.

Results: Consistent differences in DNA methylation patterns were observed between Indian and European populations in ADCY5, FTO and KCNJ11. Associations were demonstrated between FTO rs9939609 and BMI and between ADCY5rs17295401 and HDL levels in Europeans. However, these observations were not linked to local variation in DNA methylation levels. No differences in methylation patterns were observed in urban-dwelling migrants compared to their non-migrant rural-dwelling siblings in India.

Conclusions: Analysis of DNA methylation at three type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci highlighted geographical and ethnic differences in methylation patterns. These differences may be attributed to genetic and/or region-specific environmental factors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus