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Fatherhood contributes to increased hippocampal spine density and anxiety regulation in California mice.

Glasper ER, Hyer MM, Katakam J, Harper R, Ameri C, Wolz T - Brain Behav (2015)

Bottom Line: Parenting alters the hippocampus, an area of the brain that undergoes significant experience-induced plasticity and contributes to emotional regulation.Fatherhood also increased dendritic spine density of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and basal dendrites of pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus.These findings parallel those observed in maternal rodents, suggesting that the hippocampus of fathers and mothers respond similarly to offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkMaryland20742; Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive ScienceUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkMaryland20742.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Parenting alters the hippocampus, an area of the brain that undergoes significant experience-induced plasticity and contributes to emotional regulation. While the relationship between maternal care and hippocampal neuroplasticity has been characterized, the extent to which fatherhood alters the structure and function of the hippocampus is far less understood.

Methods: Here, we investigated to what extent fatherhood altered anxiety regulation and dendritic morphology of the hippocampus using the highly paternal California mouse (Peromyscus californicus).

Results: Fathers spent significantly more time on the open arms of the elevated plus maze, compared to non-fathers. Total distance traveled in the EPM was not changed by paternal experience, which suggests that the increased time spent on the open arms of the maze indicates decreased anxiety-like behavior. Fatherhood also increased dendritic spine density of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and basal dendrites of pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus.

Conclusions: These findings parallel those observed in maternal rodents, suggesting that the hippocampus of fathers and mothers respond similarly to offspring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fatherhood increases hippocampal dendritic spine density. (A, top) Fatherhood increases dendritic spine density of granule cell neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG). (A, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative DG granule cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments on the right are representative of non‐fathers (top) and fathers (bottom). (B, top) Dendritic spine density on basal, but not apical, dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells is increased with fatherhood. (B, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative CA1 pyramidal cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments represent non‐fathers (left), fathers (right), apical (top), and basal (bottom). Bars represent mean+SEM. Scale bars: cells = 40 μm, segments = 10 μm. *P ≤ 0.05.
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brb3416-fig-0002: Fatherhood increases hippocampal dendritic spine density. (A, top) Fatherhood increases dendritic spine density of granule cell neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG). (A, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative DG granule cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments on the right are representative of non‐fathers (top) and fathers (bottom). (B, top) Dendritic spine density on basal, but not apical, dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells is increased with fatherhood. (B, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative CA1 pyramidal cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments represent non‐fathers (left), fathers (right), apical (top), and basal (bottom). Bars represent mean+SEM. Scale bars: cells = 40 μm, segments = 10 μm. *P ≤ 0.05.

Mentions: Fatherhood increased dendritic spine density. Increased dendritic spine density on secondary and tertiary dendrites was observed on DG granule cells (t (18) = 2.099, P ≤ 0.05; Fig. 2A), while dendritic length and the number of branch points were not altered by paternal experience (P > 0.05). Basal dendritic spine density of pyramidal cells within area CA1 of the hippocampus was increased by fatherhood (t (18) = 2.831, P ≤ 0.05; Fig. 2B), however, no change in dendritic spine density was observed on pyramidal cell apical dendrites within area CA1 (P > 0.05). CA1 pyramidal cell basal dendritic tree lengths (non‐father: 697.5 ± 50.80; father: 639.0 ± 68.36) and number of branch points (non‐father: 7.20 ± 0.638; father: 5.567 ± 0.669) were not different (P > 0.05). However, fathers had significantly shorter CA1 pyramidal cell apical dendritic tree lengths (t (18) = 2.615, P ≤ 0.05; non‐father: 845.9 ± 48.8; father: 638.2 ± 55.86) and fewer branch points (t (18) = 2.752, P ≤ 0.05; non‐father: 8.175 ± 0.284; father: 5.817 ± 0.668).


Fatherhood contributes to increased hippocampal spine density and anxiety regulation in California mice.

Glasper ER, Hyer MM, Katakam J, Harper R, Ameri C, Wolz T - Brain Behav (2015)

Fatherhood increases hippocampal dendritic spine density. (A, top) Fatherhood increases dendritic spine density of granule cell neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG). (A, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative DG granule cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments on the right are representative of non‐fathers (top) and fathers (bottom). (B, top) Dendritic spine density on basal, but not apical, dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells is increased with fatherhood. (B, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative CA1 pyramidal cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments represent non‐fathers (left), fathers (right), apical (top), and basal (bottom). Bars represent mean+SEM. Scale bars: cells = 40 μm, segments = 10 μm. *P ≤ 0.05.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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brb3416-fig-0002: Fatherhood increases hippocampal dendritic spine density. (A, top) Fatherhood increases dendritic spine density of granule cell neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG). (A, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative DG granule cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments on the right are representative of non‐fathers (top) and fathers (bottom). (B, top) Dendritic spine density on basal, but not apical, dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells is increased with fatherhood. (B, bottom) The photomicrograph on the left depicts a representative CA1 pyramidal cell from a male California mouse. Dendritic segments represent non‐fathers (left), fathers (right), apical (top), and basal (bottom). Bars represent mean+SEM. Scale bars: cells = 40 μm, segments = 10 μm. *P ≤ 0.05.
Mentions: Fatherhood increased dendritic spine density. Increased dendritic spine density on secondary and tertiary dendrites was observed on DG granule cells (t (18) = 2.099, P ≤ 0.05; Fig. 2A), while dendritic length and the number of branch points were not altered by paternal experience (P > 0.05). Basal dendritic spine density of pyramidal cells within area CA1 of the hippocampus was increased by fatherhood (t (18) = 2.831, P ≤ 0.05; Fig. 2B), however, no change in dendritic spine density was observed on pyramidal cell apical dendrites within area CA1 (P > 0.05). CA1 pyramidal cell basal dendritic tree lengths (non‐father: 697.5 ± 50.80; father: 639.0 ± 68.36) and number of branch points (non‐father: 7.20 ± 0.638; father: 5.567 ± 0.669) were not different (P > 0.05). However, fathers had significantly shorter CA1 pyramidal cell apical dendritic tree lengths (t (18) = 2.615, P ≤ 0.05; non‐father: 845.9 ± 48.8; father: 638.2 ± 55.86) and fewer branch points (t (18) = 2.752, P ≤ 0.05; non‐father: 8.175 ± 0.284; father: 5.817 ± 0.668).

Bottom Line: Parenting alters the hippocampus, an area of the brain that undergoes significant experience-induced plasticity and contributes to emotional regulation.Fatherhood also increased dendritic spine density of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and basal dendrites of pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus.These findings parallel those observed in maternal rodents, suggesting that the hippocampus of fathers and mothers respond similarly to offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkMaryland20742; Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive ScienceUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkMaryland20742.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Parenting alters the hippocampus, an area of the brain that undergoes significant experience-induced plasticity and contributes to emotional regulation. While the relationship between maternal care and hippocampal neuroplasticity has been characterized, the extent to which fatherhood alters the structure and function of the hippocampus is far less understood.

Methods: Here, we investigated to what extent fatherhood altered anxiety regulation and dendritic morphology of the hippocampus using the highly paternal California mouse (Peromyscus californicus).

Results: Fathers spent significantly more time on the open arms of the elevated plus maze, compared to non-fathers. Total distance traveled in the EPM was not changed by paternal experience, which suggests that the increased time spent on the open arms of the maze indicates decreased anxiety-like behavior. Fatherhood also increased dendritic spine density of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and basal dendrites of pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus.

Conclusions: These findings parallel those observed in maternal rodents, suggesting that the hippocampus of fathers and mothers respond similarly to offspring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus