Limits...
Identification and characterization of a Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus immunogenic GroEL protein involved in biofilm formation.

Yi L, Wang Y, Ma Z, Lin HX, Xu B, Grenier D, Fan HJ, Lu CP - Vet. Res. (2016)

Bottom Line: Biofilm formation by this bacterium has been previously reported.In this study, we used an immunoproteomic approach to search for immunogenic proteins expressed by biofilm-grown S. equi spp. zooepidemicus.Seventeen immunoreactive proteins were found, of which nine common immunoreactive proteins were identified in planktonic and biofilm-grown bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Lab of Animal Bacteriology, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (S. equi spp. zooepidemicus) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major economic losses in the swine industry in China and is also a threat for human health. Biofilm formation by this bacterium has been previously reported. In this study, we used an immunoproteomic approach to search for immunogenic proteins expressed by biofilm-grown S. equi spp. zooepidemicus. Seventeen immunoreactive proteins were found, of which nine common immunoreactive proteins were identified in planktonic and biofilm-grown bacteria. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the S. equi spp. zooepidemicus immunoreactive GroEL chaperone protein was further investigated in mice. The protein was expressed in vivo and elicited high antibody titers following S. equi spp. zooepidemicus infections of mice. An animal challenge experiment with S. equi spp. zooepidemicus showed that 75% of mice immunized with the GroEL protein were protected. Using in vitro biofilm inhibition assays, evidence was obtained that the chaperonin GroEL may represent a promising target for the prevention and treatment of persistent S. equi spp. zooepidemicus biofilm infections. In summary, our results suggest that the recombinant GroEL protein, which is involved in biofilm formation, may efficiently stimulate an immune response, which protects against S. equi spp. zooepidemicus infections. It may therefore be a candidate of interest to be included in vaccines against S. equi spp. zooepidemicus infections.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Antibody response following vaccination. Three mice from each group were sampled at random on each date. Data represent the mean ± standard deviation (n = 3 per group) of antibody titers (log 10) vs. days post-vaccination. Bars indicate standard deviations. The antibody titers of the rGroEL protein-vaccinated mice were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the PBS-injected mice at all time points post-vaccination. No significant differences in titers were found between the rGroEL protein-vaccine and the inactivated S. equi spp. zooepidemicus vaccine (P > 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834820&req=5

Fig3: Antibody response following vaccination. Three mice from each group were sampled at random on each date. Data represent the mean ± standard deviation (n = 3 per group) of antibody titers (log 10) vs. days post-vaccination. Bars indicate standard deviations. The antibody titers of the rGroEL protein-vaccinated mice were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the PBS-injected mice at all time points post-vaccination. No significant differences in titers were found between the rGroEL protein-vaccine and the inactivated S. equi spp. zooepidemicus vaccine (P > 0.05).

Mentions: The GroEL-specific antibody response elicited by immunization with the rGroEL protein was monitored by determining the serum antibody titers of all the experimental mice. The GroEL protein-specific antibody titers of mice vaccinated with the recombinant protein were markedly higher than those of the PBS-injected mice at day 7 post-vaccination and continued to increase by day 28 (Figure 3). The antibody titers of the rGroEL protein-vaccinated mice were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the PBS-injected mice at all time points post-vaccination. No significant differences in titers were found between the rGroEL protein-vaccine and the inactivated S. equi spp. zooepidemicus vaccine (P > 0.05).Figure 3


Identification and characterization of a Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus immunogenic GroEL protein involved in biofilm formation.

Yi L, Wang Y, Ma Z, Lin HX, Xu B, Grenier D, Fan HJ, Lu CP - Vet. Res. (2016)

Antibody response following vaccination. Three mice from each group were sampled at random on each date. Data represent the mean ± standard deviation (n = 3 per group) of antibody titers (log 10) vs. days post-vaccination. Bars indicate standard deviations. The antibody titers of the rGroEL protein-vaccinated mice were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the PBS-injected mice at all time points post-vaccination. No significant differences in titers were found between the rGroEL protein-vaccine and the inactivated S. equi spp. zooepidemicus vaccine (P > 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834820&req=5

Fig3: Antibody response following vaccination. Three mice from each group were sampled at random on each date. Data represent the mean ± standard deviation (n = 3 per group) of antibody titers (log 10) vs. days post-vaccination. Bars indicate standard deviations. The antibody titers of the rGroEL protein-vaccinated mice were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the PBS-injected mice at all time points post-vaccination. No significant differences in titers were found between the rGroEL protein-vaccine and the inactivated S. equi spp. zooepidemicus vaccine (P > 0.05).
Mentions: The GroEL-specific antibody response elicited by immunization with the rGroEL protein was monitored by determining the serum antibody titers of all the experimental mice. The GroEL protein-specific antibody titers of mice vaccinated with the recombinant protein were markedly higher than those of the PBS-injected mice at day 7 post-vaccination and continued to increase by day 28 (Figure 3). The antibody titers of the rGroEL protein-vaccinated mice were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those of the PBS-injected mice at all time points post-vaccination. No significant differences in titers were found between the rGroEL protein-vaccine and the inactivated S. equi spp. zooepidemicus vaccine (P > 0.05).Figure 3

Bottom Line: Biofilm formation by this bacterium has been previously reported.In this study, we used an immunoproteomic approach to search for immunogenic proteins expressed by biofilm-grown S. equi spp. zooepidemicus.Seventeen immunoreactive proteins were found, of which nine common immunoreactive proteins were identified in planktonic and biofilm-grown bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Lab of Animal Bacteriology, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (S. equi spp. zooepidemicus) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major economic losses in the swine industry in China and is also a threat for human health. Biofilm formation by this bacterium has been previously reported. In this study, we used an immunoproteomic approach to search for immunogenic proteins expressed by biofilm-grown S. equi spp. zooepidemicus. Seventeen immunoreactive proteins were found, of which nine common immunoreactive proteins were identified in planktonic and biofilm-grown bacteria. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the S. equi spp. zooepidemicus immunoreactive GroEL chaperone protein was further investigated in mice. The protein was expressed in vivo and elicited high antibody titers following S. equi spp. zooepidemicus infections of mice. An animal challenge experiment with S. equi spp. zooepidemicus showed that 75% of mice immunized with the GroEL protein were protected. Using in vitro biofilm inhibition assays, evidence was obtained that the chaperonin GroEL may represent a promising target for the prevention and treatment of persistent S. equi spp. zooepidemicus biofilm infections. In summary, our results suggest that the recombinant GroEL protein, which is involved in biofilm formation, may efficiently stimulate an immune response, which protects against S. equi spp. zooepidemicus infections. It may therefore be a candidate of interest to be included in vaccines against S. equi spp. zooepidemicus infections.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus