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Calorie restriction as an intervention in ageing.

López-Lluch G, Navas P - J. Physiol. (Lond.) (2016)

Bottom Line: CR produces a pleiotropic effect and improves multiple metabolic pathways, generating benefits to the whole organism.Finally, the anti-inflammatory effect of CR is an interesting emerging factor to be taken into consideration.In the present revision we focus on the general effect of CR and other mimetics in longevity, focusing especially on the cardiovascular system and skeletal muscle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Centro Andaluz de Biología del Desarrollo, CABD-CSIC, CIBERER, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Carretera de Utrera km. 1, 41013, Sevilla, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Activities of the plasma membrane redox systemThe Q‐dependent enzymatic activities at the plasma membrane (PM) not only prevent oxidative damage affecting lipid peroxidation through reduced Q or by maintaining vitamin E turnover in the membrane, but can also show other regulatory activities in the cytosol. The oxidation of NADH or NAD(P)H in the PM environment can regulate the activity of NAD+‐dependent deacetylases such as sirtuins, mainly SIRT1. These sirtuins will further regulate the activity of many other proteins involved in the control of metabolism and mitochondrial turnover such as PGC‐1α, FOXO or NOS among others. These proteins are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, turnover and oxidative activity. Thus, upregulation of PMRS by CR in old animals can be linked to a higher SIRT1 activity and the regulation of mitochondrial function in old animals.
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tjp6990-fig-0001: Activities of the plasma membrane redox systemThe Q‐dependent enzymatic activities at the plasma membrane (PM) not only prevent oxidative damage affecting lipid peroxidation through reduced Q or by maintaining vitamin E turnover in the membrane, but can also show other regulatory activities in the cytosol. The oxidation of NADH or NAD(P)H in the PM environment can regulate the activity of NAD+‐dependent deacetylases such as sirtuins, mainly SIRT1. These sirtuins will further regulate the activity of many other proteins involved in the control of metabolism and mitochondrial turnover such as PGC‐1α, FOXO or NOS among others. These proteins are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, turnover and oxidative activity. Thus, upregulation of PMRS by CR in old animals can be linked to a higher SIRT1 activity and the regulation of mitochondrial function in old animals.

Mentions: Importantly, oxidoreductases such as CytB5Rase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) are involved in the prevention of lipid peroxidation through a coenzyme Q‐dependent system present in cell membranes and especially in plasma membrane. This system is known as the plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) and is also involved in the maintenance of the redox cycle of vitamin E (Fig. 1 Navas et al. 2005, 2007). Several years ago, we demonstrated that CR induces redox coenzyme Q‐dependent activities at the plasma membrane in old mouse and rat liver but not in young animals (De Cabo et al. 2004; Lopez‐Lluch et al. 2005). This age‐dependent effect was further confirmed in brain (Hyun et al. 2006) and in muscle (Rodriguez‐Bies et al. 2015). Therefore, the age of the organisms seems to play an important role in the relationship of CR with membrane‐linked antioxidant activities.


Calorie restriction as an intervention in ageing.

López-Lluch G, Navas P - J. Physiol. (Lond.) (2016)

Activities of the plasma membrane redox systemThe Q‐dependent enzymatic activities at the plasma membrane (PM) not only prevent oxidative damage affecting lipid peroxidation through reduced Q or by maintaining vitamin E turnover in the membrane, but can also show other regulatory activities in the cytosol. The oxidation of NADH or NAD(P)H in the PM environment can regulate the activity of NAD+‐dependent deacetylases such as sirtuins, mainly SIRT1. These sirtuins will further regulate the activity of many other proteins involved in the control of metabolism and mitochondrial turnover such as PGC‐1α, FOXO or NOS among others. These proteins are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, turnover and oxidative activity. Thus, upregulation of PMRS by CR in old animals can be linked to a higher SIRT1 activity and the regulation of mitochondrial function in old animals.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy-nc-nd
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834802&req=5

tjp6990-fig-0001: Activities of the plasma membrane redox systemThe Q‐dependent enzymatic activities at the plasma membrane (PM) not only prevent oxidative damage affecting lipid peroxidation through reduced Q or by maintaining vitamin E turnover in the membrane, but can also show other regulatory activities in the cytosol. The oxidation of NADH or NAD(P)H in the PM environment can regulate the activity of NAD+‐dependent deacetylases such as sirtuins, mainly SIRT1. These sirtuins will further regulate the activity of many other proteins involved in the control of metabolism and mitochondrial turnover such as PGC‐1α, FOXO or NOS among others. These proteins are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, turnover and oxidative activity. Thus, upregulation of PMRS by CR in old animals can be linked to a higher SIRT1 activity and the regulation of mitochondrial function in old animals.
Mentions: Importantly, oxidoreductases such as CytB5Rase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) are involved in the prevention of lipid peroxidation through a coenzyme Q‐dependent system present in cell membranes and especially in plasma membrane. This system is known as the plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) and is also involved in the maintenance of the redox cycle of vitamin E (Fig. 1 Navas et al. 2005, 2007). Several years ago, we demonstrated that CR induces redox coenzyme Q‐dependent activities at the plasma membrane in old mouse and rat liver but not in young animals (De Cabo et al. 2004; Lopez‐Lluch et al. 2005). This age‐dependent effect was further confirmed in brain (Hyun et al. 2006) and in muscle (Rodriguez‐Bies et al. 2015). Therefore, the age of the organisms seems to play an important role in the relationship of CR with membrane‐linked antioxidant activities.

Bottom Line: CR produces a pleiotropic effect and improves multiple metabolic pathways, generating benefits to the whole organism.Finally, the anti-inflammatory effect of CR is an interesting emerging factor to be taken into consideration.In the present revision we focus on the general effect of CR and other mimetics in longevity, focusing especially on the cardiovascular system and skeletal muscle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Centro Andaluz de Biología del Desarrollo, CABD-CSIC, CIBERER, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Carretera de Utrera km. 1, 41013, Sevilla, Spain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus