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Application of computed tomography virtual noncontrast spectral imaging in evaluation of hepatic metastases: a preliminary study.

Tian SF, Liu AL, Liu JH, Sun MY, Wang HQ, Liu YJ - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: The image quality and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of metastasis of the four groups were compared with ANOVA analysis.There were no significant differences in image quality among TNC, VNCa and VNCv images (P > 0.05).The metastasis detection rate of the four nonenhanced groups with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Shenyang 116011, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate hepatic metastases using computed tomography (CT) virtual noncontrast (VNC) spectral imaging in a retrospective analysis.

Methods: Forty hepatic metastases patients underwent CT scans including the conventional true noncontrast (TNC) and the tri-phasic contrast-enhanced dual energy spectral scans in the hepatic arterial, portal venous, and equilibrium phases. The tri-phasic spectral CT images were used to obtain three groups of VNC images including in the arterial (VNCa), venous (VNCv), and equilibrium (VNCe) phase by the material decomposition process using water and iodine as a base material pair. The image quality and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of metastasis of the four groups were compared with ANOVA analysis. The metastasis detection rates with the four nonenhanced image groups were calculated and compared using the Chi-square test.

Results: There were no significant differences in image quality among TNC, VNCa and VNCv images (P > 0.05). The quality of VNCe images was significantly worse than that of other three groups (P < 0.05). The mean CNR of metastasis in the TNC and VNCs images was 1.86, 2.42, 1.92, and 1.94, respectively; the mean CNR of metastasis in VNCa images was significantly higher than that in other three groups (P < 0.05), while no statistically significant difference was observed among VNCv, VNCe and TNC images (P > 0.05). The metastasis detection rate of the four nonenhanced groups with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: The quality of VNCa and VNCv images is identical to that of TNC images, and the metastasis detection rate in VNC images is similar to that in TNC images. VNC images obtained from arterial phase show metastases more clearly. Thus, VNCa imaging may be a surrogate to TNC imaging in hepatic metastasis diagnosis.

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True noncontrast image (a) and virtual noncontrast arterial image; (b) one ROI was set at hepatic metastasis (arrow) when contrast-to-noise ratio was measured, and three consistent region of interests were set at normal liver.
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Figure 1: True noncontrast image (a) and virtual noncontrast arterial image; (b) one ROI was set at hepatic metastasis (arrow) when contrast-to-noise ratio was measured, and three consistent region of interests were set at normal liver.

Mentions: All included hepatic metastases of each patient were selected as one region of interest (ROI). Three ROIs were placed on the normal liver parenchyma that has uniform density, few artifacts, and far away from great blood vessels. The ROIs for both the liver parenchyma and metastasis were at the same image-level to guarantee the consistent position, shape and size of ROIs in TNC and VNC images. The area of ROI was approximately 1.0 cm2 [Figure 1] and was adjustable according to the metastasis size (not exceeding the metastasis size).


Application of computed tomography virtual noncontrast spectral imaging in evaluation of hepatic metastases: a preliminary study.

Tian SF, Liu AL, Liu JH, Sun MY, Wang HQ, Liu YJ - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

True noncontrast image (a) and virtual noncontrast arterial image; (b) one ROI was set at hepatic metastasis (arrow) when contrast-to-noise ratio was measured, and three consistent region of interests were set at normal liver.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834770&req=5

Figure 1: True noncontrast image (a) and virtual noncontrast arterial image; (b) one ROI was set at hepatic metastasis (arrow) when contrast-to-noise ratio was measured, and three consistent region of interests were set at normal liver.
Mentions: All included hepatic metastases of each patient were selected as one region of interest (ROI). Three ROIs were placed on the normal liver parenchyma that has uniform density, few artifacts, and far away from great blood vessels. The ROIs for both the liver parenchyma and metastasis were at the same image-level to guarantee the consistent position, shape and size of ROIs in TNC and VNC images. The area of ROI was approximately 1.0 cm2 [Figure 1] and was adjustable according to the metastasis size (not exceeding the metastasis size).

Bottom Line: The image quality and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of metastasis of the four groups were compared with ANOVA analysis.There were no significant differences in image quality among TNC, VNCa and VNCv images (P > 0.05).The metastasis detection rate of the four nonenhanced groups with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Shenyang 116011, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate hepatic metastases using computed tomography (CT) virtual noncontrast (VNC) spectral imaging in a retrospective analysis.

Methods: Forty hepatic metastases patients underwent CT scans including the conventional true noncontrast (TNC) and the tri-phasic contrast-enhanced dual energy spectral scans in the hepatic arterial, portal venous, and equilibrium phases. The tri-phasic spectral CT images were used to obtain three groups of VNC images including in the arterial (VNCa), venous (VNCv), and equilibrium (VNCe) phase by the material decomposition process using water and iodine as a base material pair. The image quality and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of metastasis of the four groups were compared with ANOVA analysis. The metastasis detection rates with the four nonenhanced image groups were calculated and compared using the Chi-square test.

Results: There were no significant differences in image quality among TNC, VNCa and VNCv images (P > 0.05). The quality of VNCe images was significantly worse than that of other three groups (P < 0.05). The mean CNR of metastasis in the TNC and VNCs images was 1.86, 2.42, 1.92, and 1.94, respectively; the mean CNR of metastasis in VNCa images was significantly higher than that in other three groups (P < 0.05), while no statistically significant difference was observed among VNCv, VNCe and TNC images (P > 0.05). The metastasis detection rate of the four nonenhanced groups with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: The quality of VNCa and VNCv images is identical to that of TNC images, and the metastasis detection rate in VNC images is similar to that in TNC images. VNC images obtained from arterial phase show metastases more clearly. Thus, VNCa imaging may be a surrogate to TNC imaging in hepatic metastasis diagnosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus