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Amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in Parkinson's disease: a 2-year longitudinal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Hu XF, Zhang JQ, Jiang XM, Zhou CY, Wei LQ, Yin XT, Li J, Zhang YL, Wang J - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: Compared to the baseline in the 2 years follow-up, the patients with PD presented with increased fALFF values in the right middle temporal gyrus and right middle occipital gyrus while also having decreased fALFF values in the right cerebellum, right thalamus, right striatum, left superior parietal lobule, left IPL, left precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim).In addition, the fALFF values in the right cerebellum were positively correlated with the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores (r = 0.51, P < 0.05, uncorrected) and the change in the UPDRS motor score (r = 0.61, P < 0.05, uncorrected).The baseline and longitudinal changes of the fALFF values in our study suggest that dysfunction in the brain may affect the regions related to cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic loops and cerebello-thalamo-cortical loops as the disease progresses and that alterations to the spontaneous neural activity of the cerebellum may also play an important role in the disease's progression in patients with PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Neuroimaging studies have found that functional changes exist in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in patients with PD are task-related and cross-sectional. This study investigated the functional changes observed in patients with PD, at both baseline and after 2 years, using resting-state fMRI. It further investigated the relationship between whole-brain spontaneous neural activity of patients with PD and their clinical characteristics.

Methods: Seventeen patients with PD underwent an MRI procedure at both baseline and after 2 years using resting-state fMRI that was derived from the same 3T MRI. In addition, 20 age- and sex-matched, healthy controls were examined using resting-state fMRI. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) approach was used to analyze the fMRI data. Nonlinear registration was used to model within-subject changes over the scanning interval, as well as changes between the patients with PD and the healthy controls. A correlative analysis between the fALFF values and clinical characteristics was performed in the regions showing fALFF differences.

Results: Compared to the control subjects, the patients with PD showed increased fALFF values in the left inferior temporal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and right middle frontal gyrus. Compared to the baseline in the 2 years follow-up, the patients with PD presented with increased fALFF values in the right middle temporal gyrus and right middle occipital gyrus while also having decreased fALFF values in the right cerebellum, right thalamus, right striatum, left superior parietal lobule, left IPL, left precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim). In addition, the fALFF values in the right cerebellum were positively correlated with the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores (r = 0.51, P < 0.05, uncorrected) and the change in the UPDRS motor score (r = 0.61, P < 0.05, uncorrected).

Conclusions: The baseline and longitudinal changes of the fALFF values in our study suggest that dysfunction in the brain may affect the regions related to cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic loops and cerebello-thalamo-cortical loops as the disease progresses and that alterations to the spontaneous neural activity of the cerebellum may also play an important role in the disease's progression in patients with PD.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

T-statistics maps between patients’ baseline and 2 years later. Significantly increased fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) value in multiple areas (P < 0.01 alphasim corrected), including right temporal lobe and occipital lobe was exhibited; while apparently decreased fALFF in the right cerebellum, right rhalamus and left parietal cortex. T-score bars are shown on the right. Hot and cold colors indicate fALFF increase or decrease, respectively. The left side of the image corresponds to the right side of the brain.
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Figure 3: T-statistics maps between patients’ baseline and 2 years later. Significantly increased fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) value in multiple areas (P < 0.01 alphasim corrected), including right temporal lobe and occipital lobe was exhibited; while apparently decreased fALFF in the right cerebellum, right rhalamus and left parietal cortex. T-score bars are shown on the right. Hot and cold colors indicate fALFF increase or decrease, respectively. The left side of the image corresponds to the right side of the brain.

Mentions: Compared with the healthy control subjects, the patients with PD showed increased fALFF values in the left inferior temporal gyrus (ITG), right IPL and right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim) [Table 3, Figures 1 and 2]. A paired t-test showed that when compared with the baseline, the patients with PD who were analyzed during the 2 years follow-up presented with increased fALFF values in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and right middle occipital gyrus (MOG) and with decreased fALFF values in the right cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL), right thalamus, left superior parietal lobule, left IPL, left precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim) [Table 4, Figures 3 and 4]. In addition, the fALFF values in the right cerebellum were positively correlated with the UPDRS motor scores (correlation analysis in REST: r = 0.51, P < 0.05, uncorrected) [Figures 5 and 6].


Amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in Parkinson's disease: a 2-year longitudinal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Hu XF, Zhang JQ, Jiang XM, Zhou CY, Wei LQ, Yin XT, Li J, Zhang YL, Wang J - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

T-statistics maps between patients’ baseline and 2 years later. Significantly increased fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) value in multiple areas (P < 0.01 alphasim corrected), including right temporal lobe and occipital lobe was exhibited; while apparently decreased fALFF in the right cerebellum, right rhalamus and left parietal cortex. T-score bars are shown on the right. Hot and cold colors indicate fALFF increase or decrease, respectively. The left side of the image corresponds to the right side of the brain.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834768&req=5

Figure 3: T-statistics maps between patients’ baseline and 2 years later. Significantly increased fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) value in multiple areas (P < 0.01 alphasim corrected), including right temporal lobe and occipital lobe was exhibited; while apparently decreased fALFF in the right cerebellum, right rhalamus and left parietal cortex. T-score bars are shown on the right. Hot and cold colors indicate fALFF increase or decrease, respectively. The left side of the image corresponds to the right side of the brain.
Mentions: Compared with the healthy control subjects, the patients with PD showed increased fALFF values in the left inferior temporal gyrus (ITG), right IPL and right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim) [Table 3, Figures 1 and 2]. A paired t-test showed that when compared with the baseline, the patients with PD who were analyzed during the 2 years follow-up presented with increased fALFF values in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and right middle occipital gyrus (MOG) and with decreased fALFF values in the right cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL), right thalamus, left superior parietal lobule, left IPL, left precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim) [Table 4, Figures 3 and 4]. In addition, the fALFF values in the right cerebellum were positively correlated with the UPDRS motor scores (correlation analysis in REST: r = 0.51, P < 0.05, uncorrected) [Figures 5 and 6].

Bottom Line: Compared to the baseline in the 2 years follow-up, the patients with PD presented with increased fALFF values in the right middle temporal gyrus and right middle occipital gyrus while also having decreased fALFF values in the right cerebellum, right thalamus, right striatum, left superior parietal lobule, left IPL, left precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim).In addition, the fALFF values in the right cerebellum were positively correlated with the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores (r = 0.51, P < 0.05, uncorrected) and the change in the UPDRS motor score (r = 0.61, P < 0.05, uncorrected).The baseline and longitudinal changes of the fALFF values in our study suggest that dysfunction in the brain may affect the regions related to cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic loops and cerebello-thalamo-cortical loops as the disease progresses and that alterations to the spontaneous neural activity of the cerebellum may also play an important role in the disease's progression in patients with PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Neuroimaging studies have found that functional changes exist in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in patients with PD are task-related and cross-sectional. This study investigated the functional changes observed in patients with PD, at both baseline and after 2 years, using resting-state fMRI. It further investigated the relationship between whole-brain spontaneous neural activity of patients with PD and their clinical characteristics.

Methods: Seventeen patients with PD underwent an MRI procedure at both baseline and after 2 years using resting-state fMRI that was derived from the same 3T MRI. In addition, 20 age- and sex-matched, healthy controls were examined using resting-state fMRI. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) approach was used to analyze the fMRI data. Nonlinear registration was used to model within-subject changes over the scanning interval, as well as changes between the patients with PD and the healthy controls. A correlative analysis between the fALFF values and clinical characteristics was performed in the regions showing fALFF differences.

Results: Compared to the control subjects, the patients with PD showed increased fALFF values in the left inferior temporal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and right middle frontal gyrus. Compared to the baseline in the 2 years follow-up, the patients with PD presented with increased fALFF values in the right middle temporal gyrus and right middle occipital gyrus while also having decreased fALFF values in the right cerebellum, right thalamus, right striatum, left superior parietal lobule, left IPL, left precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus (P < 0.01, after correction with AlphaSim). In addition, the fALFF values in the right cerebellum were positively correlated with the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores (r = 0.51, P < 0.05, uncorrected) and the change in the UPDRS motor score (r = 0.61, P < 0.05, uncorrected).

Conclusions: The baseline and longitudinal changes of the fALFF values in our study suggest that dysfunction in the brain may affect the regions related to cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic loops and cerebello-thalamo-cortical loops as the disease progresses and that alterations to the spontaneous neural activity of the cerebellum may also play an important role in the disease's progression in patients with PD.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus