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Aging and Functional Health Literacy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Kobayashi LC, Wardle J, Wolf MS, von Wagner C - J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: Older age was strongly associated with limited health literacy in analyses that measured health literacy as reading comprehension, reasoning, and numeracy skills (random-effects odds ratio [OR] = 4.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.13-5.64).By contrast, older age was weakly associated with limited health literacy in studies that measured health literacy as medical vocabulary (random-effects OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03-1.37).Vocabulary-based health literacy skills appear more stable with age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK. l.kobayashi.12@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Funnel plot of standard error by log odds ratio to assess publication bias, with studies imputed using the “trim and fill” method shown in black.
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Figure 3: Funnel plot of standard error by log odds ratio to assess publication bias, with studies imputed using the “trim and fill” method shown in black.

Mentions: The classic fail-safe N was 2,080, indicating that this number of theoretically unpublished studies with results would have to exist in order to attenuate the overall pooled effect estimate to the . The funnel plot showed reasonable symmetry, although studies with larger lnOR values tended to have larger standard errors. Duval and Tweedle’s “fill and trim” method imputed four additional studies to produce symmetry in the graph (Figure 3). The imputed overall pooled random-effects OR that takes publication bias into account was 3.01 (95% CI: 2.19–4.13). This imputed OR is more extreme but not significantly different to the original overall random-effects OR of 2.56 (95% CI: 1.85–3.53).


Aging and Functional Health Literacy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Kobayashi LC, Wardle J, Wolf MS, von Wagner C - J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci (2014)

Funnel plot of standard error by log odds ratio to assess publication bias, with studies imputed using the “trim and fill” method shown in black.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834761&req=5

Figure 3: Funnel plot of standard error by log odds ratio to assess publication bias, with studies imputed using the “trim and fill” method shown in black.
Mentions: The classic fail-safe N was 2,080, indicating that this number of theoretically unpublished studies with results would have to exist in order to attenuate the overall pooled effect estimate to the . The funnel plot showed reasonable symmetry, although studies with larger lnOR values tended to have larger standard errors. Duval and Tweedle’s “fill and trim” method imputed four additional studies to produce symmetry in the graph (Figure 3). The imputed overall pooled random-effects OR that takes publication bias into account was 3.01 (95% CI: 2.19–4.13). This imputed OR is more extreme but not significantly different to the original overall random-effects OR of 2.56 (95% CI: 1.85–3.53).

Bottom Line: Older age was strongly associated with limited health literacy in analyses that measured health literacy as reading comprehension, reasoning, and numeracy skills (random-effects odds ratio [OR] = 4.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.13-5.64).By contrast, older age was weakly associated with limited health literacy in studies that measured health literacy as medical vocabulary (random-effects OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03-1.37).Vocabulary-based health literacy skills appear more stable with age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK. l.kobayashi.12@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.