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Aerobic Exercise As a Potential Way to Improve Self-Control after Ego-Depletion in Healthy Female College Students.

Zou Z, Liu Y, Xie J, Huang X - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: Participants in the experimental group were required to run in their campus running field for 30 min for a period of 5 weeks.Before and after the 5-week intervention, participants completed a pain threshold test, a color word Stroop task and the following Cold Pressor Task (CPT) (with and without a distraction component).There was significant decrease of pain tolerance in session 2 relative to session 1 in the control group, but no such decline was found in the experimental group (though the improvement of pain tolerance was not significant), possibly suggesting successful self-control against this kind of decline.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To test whether aerobic exercise can help build self-control stamina in healthy female young adults. Stamina in this context is defined as the capability to endure ego depletion, which can be measured with a self-control task following another activity also requiring self-control.

Methods: Forty-five healthy undergraduate women were randomized to either an experimental group or control group. Participants in the experimental group were required to run in their campus running field for 30 min for a period of 5 weeks. Individuals in the control group were required to do diary entries regarding self-control in their daily lives, also for a period of 5 weeks. Before and after the 5-week intervention, participants completed a pain threshold test, a color word Stroop task and the following Cold Pressor Task (CPT) (with and without a distraction component).

Results: There was significant decrease of pain tolerance in session 2 relative to session 1 in the control group, but no such decline was found in the experimental group (though the improvement of pain tolerance was not significant), possibly suggesting successful self-control against this kind of decline.

Conclusions: Five weeks of aerobic exercise increased self-control after ego depletion in terms of pain tolerance. These findings suggest that aerobic exercise may serve as a potential effective intervention for enhancing self-control in a college female population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean pain tolerance scores change and S.E.M. of the two groups (Exp. vs. Control group) in the two Cold Pressor Tasks. Pain tolerance was calculated by the Loge transformation of immersion duration in cold water. Change = Pain tolerance_post−training – Pain tolerance_pre−training.*p < 0.05.
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Figure 1: Mean pain tolerance scores change and S.E.M. of the two groups (Exp. vs. Control group) in the two Cold Pressor Tasks. Pain tolerance was calculated by the Loge transformation of immersion duration in cold water. Change = Pain tolerance_post−training – Pain tolerance_pre−training.*p < 0.05.

Mentions: The mean and SD of pain tolerance in CPTs are shown in Table 2. For Cold Pressor Task I, a repeated measures-ANOVA analysis showed no significant main effect of session (Pre vs. Post) and intervention (Running vs. Daily writing), while the interaction was significant [F(1, 34) = 6.57, p = 0.015, η2 = 0.162]. A further simple effect analysis showed that the control group had a significant decline of pain tolerance across sessions [F(1, 34) = 6.80, p = 0.013, η2 = 0.167]. However, improvement of pain tolerance in the experimental group across sessions was not significant (F(1, 34) = 1.03, p = 0.317, η2 = 0.029]. Furthermore, we did an independent samples t-test for the changes of pain tolerance across sessions and verified that the control group had significantly more deterioration [t(34) = 2.56, p = 0.015], (see Figure 1).


Aerobic Exercise As a Potential Way to Improve Self-Control after Ego-Depletion in Healthy Female College Students.

Zou Z, Liu Y, Xie J, Huang X - Front Psychol (2016)

Mean pain tolerance scores change and S.E.M. of the two groups (Exp. vs. Control group) in the two Cold Pressor Tasks. Pain tolerance was calculated by the Loge transformation of immersion duration in cold water. Change = Pain tolerance_post−training – Pain tolerance_pre−training.*p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834755&req=5

Figure 1: Mean pain tolerance scores change and S.E.M. of the two groups (Exp. vs. Control group) in the two Cold Pressor Tasks. Pain tolerance was calculated by the Loge transformation of immersion duration in cold water. Change = Pain tolerance_post−training – Pain tolerance_pre−training.*p < 0.05.
Mentions: The mean and SD of pain tolerance in CPTs are shown in Table 2. For Cold Pressor Task I, a repeated measures-ANOVA analysis showed no significant main effect of session (Pre vs. Post) and intervention (Running vs. Daily writing), while the interaction was significant [F(1, 34) = 6.57, p = 0.015, η2 = 0.162]. A further simple effect analysis showed that the control group had a significant decline of pain tolerance across sessions [F(1, 34) = 6.80, p = 0.013, η2 = 0.167]. However, improvement of pain tolerance in the experimental group across sessions was not significant (F(1, 34) = 1.03, p = 0.317, η2 = 0.029]. Furthermore, we did an independent samples t-test for the changes of pain tolerance across sessions and verified that the control group had significantly more deterioration [t(34) = 2.56, p = 0.015], (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Participants in the experimental group were required to run in their campus running field for 30 min for a period of 5 weeks.Before and after the 5-week intervention, participants completed a pain threshold test, a color word Stroop task and the following Cold Pressor Task (CPT) (with and without a distraction component).There was significant decrease of pain tolerance in session 2 relative to session 1 in the control group, but no such decline was found in the experimental group (though the improvement of pain tolerance was not significant), possibly suggesting successful self-control against this kind of decline.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To test whether aerobic exercise can help build self-control stamina in healthy female young adults. Stamina in this context is defined as the capability to endure ego depletion, which can be measured with a self-control task following another activity also requiring self-control.

Methods: Forty-five healthy undergraduate women were randomized to either an experimental group or control group. Participants in the experimental group were required to run in their campus running field for 30 min for a period of 5 weeks. Individuals in the control group were required to do diary entries regarding self-control in their daily lives, also for a period of 5 weeks. Before and after the 5-week intervention, participants completed a pain threshold test, a color word Stroop task and the following Cold Pressor Task (CPT) (with and without a distraction component).

Results: There was significant decrease of pain tolerance in session 2 relative to session 1 in the control group, but no such decline was found in the experimental group (though the improvement of pain tolerance was not significant), possibly suggesting successful self-control against this kind of decline.

Conclusions: Five weeks of aerobic exercise increased self-control after ego depletion in terms of pain tolerance. These findings suggest that aerobic exercise may serve as a potential effective intervention for enhancing self-control in a college female population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus