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The improvement of large High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) particle levels, and presumably HDL metabolism, depend on effects of low-carbohydrate diet and weight loss.

Finelli C, Crispino P, Gioia S, La Sala N, D'amico L, La Grotta M, Miro O, Colarusso D - EXCLI J (2016)

Bottom Line: The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year.Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001).In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Obesity and Eating Disorders, Stella Maris Mediterraneum Foundation, Chiaromonte, Potenza, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Depressed levels of atheroprotective large HDL particles are common in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increases in large HDL particles are favourably associated with reduced CVD event risk and coronary plaque burden. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year. This study was performed by screening for body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome in 160 consecutive subjects referred to our out-patient Metabolic Unit in South Italy. We administered dietary advice to four small groups rather than individually. A single team comprised of a dietitian and physician administered diet-specific advice to each group. Large HDL particles at baseline and 1 year were measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Dietary intake was assessed via 3-day diet records. Although 1-year weight loss did not differ between diet groups (mean 4.4 %), increases in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction across the four diets (p<0.001 for trend). Regression analysis indicated that magnitude of carbohydrate restriction (percentage of calories as carbohydrate at 1 year) and weight loss were each independent predictors of 1-year increases in large HDL concentration. Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001). In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels. Comparison trials with cardiovascular outcomes are needed to more fully evaluate these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a) Mean change in weight at 1 year according to diet type; b) Mean change in large HDL at 1 year according to diet type
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Figure 1: a) Mean change in weight at 1 year according to diet type; b) Mean change in large HDL at 1 year according to diet type

Mentions: The mean 1-year weight loss for all participants was 4.4 % (SD 6.3 %) with no statistical difference between diet groups (Figure 1a(Fig. 1)). In contrast, the mean increase in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction recommended by each eating strategy (Figure 1b(Fig. 1)). At 1 year, large HDL particles were increased from baseline by 36 % for Atkins, 32 % for Zone, 16 % for Weight Watchers, and 2 % for Ornish (p < 0.001 for linear trend, Figure 2a(Fig. 2)). In comparison, HDL cholesterol increased approximately 16 % in the Atkins, Zone, and Weight Watchers groups and 1 % in the Ornish group at 1 year (Figure 2a(Fig. 2)). The univariate correlation between 12-month absolute change in HDL cholesterol versus absolute change in large HDL was less than 0.5 (Pearson r=0.47, p=0.001, Figure 2b(Fig. 2)).


The improvement of large High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) particle levels, and presumably HDL metabolism, depend on effects of low-carbohydrate diet and weight loss.

Finelli C, Crispino P, Gioia S, La Sala N, D'amico L, La Grotta M, Miro O, Colarusso D - EXCLI J (2016)

a) Mean change in weight at 1 year according to diet type; b) Mean change in large HDL at 1 year according to diet type
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834750&req=5

Figure 1: a) Mean change in weight at 1 year according to diet type; b) Mean change in large HDL at 1 year according to diet type
Mentions: The mean 1-year weight loss for all participants was 4.4 % (SD 6.3 %) with no statistical difference between diet groups (Figure 1a(Fig. 1)). In contrast, the mean increase in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction recommended by each eating strategy (Figure 1b(Fig. 1)). At 1 year, large HDL particles were increased from baseline by 36 % for Atkins, 32 % for Zone, 16 % for Weight Watchers, and 2 % for Ornish (p < 0.001 for linear trend, Figure 2a(Fig. 2)). In comparison, HDL cholesterol increased approximately 16 % in the Atkins, Zone, and Weight Watchers groups and 1 % in the Ornish group at 1 year (Figure 2a(Fig. 2)). The univariate correlation between 12-month absolute change in HDL cholesterol versus absolute change in large HDL was less than 0.5 (Pearson r=0.47, p=0.001, Figure 2b(Fig. 2)).

Bottom Line: The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year.Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001).In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Obesity and Eating Disorders, Stella Maris Mediterraneum Foundation, Chiaromonte, Potenza, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Depressed levels of atheroprotective large HDL particles are common in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increases in large HDL particles are favourably associated with reduced CVD event risk and coronary plaque burden. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year. This study was performed by screening for body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome in 160 consecutive subjects referred to our out-patient Metabolic Unit in South Italy. We administered dietary advice to four small groups rather than individually. A single team comprised of a dietitian and physician administered diet-specific advice to each group. Large HDL particles at baseline and 1 year were measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Dietary intake was assessed via 3-day diet records. Although 1-year weight loss did not differ between diet groups (mean 4.4 %), increases in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction across the four diets (p<0.001 for trend). Regression analysis indicated that magnitude of carbohydrate restriction (percentage of calories as carbohydrate at 1 year) and weight loss were each independent predictors of 1-year increases in large HDL concentration. Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001). In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels. Comparison trials with cardiovascular outcomes are needed to more fully evaluate these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus